School of Engineering


Showing 1-10 of 37 Results

  • Andreas Paepcke

    Andreas Paepcke

    Sr Research Engineer, Computer Science

    BioDr. Andreas Paepcke is a Senior Research Scientist and Director for Data Analytics in support of online teaching efforts at Stanford University. His interests include user interfaces and systems for teaching and learning. He uses data analytics to create tools that benefit these online efforts. In the past Dr. Paepcke and his groups of students designed and implemented WebBase, an experimental storage and high speed dissemination system for Web content. Their work on small devices focused on novel methods for summarizing and transforming Web pages, and browsing images on small displays. Dr. Paepcke has served on numerous program committees, including a position as Vice Program Chair, heading the World-Wide Web Conference's 'Browsers and User Interfaces' program track, and as Program Chair for the Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2008. He served on several National Science Foundation proposal evaluation panels and was co-founding associate editor of ACM Transactions on the Web. Dr. Paepcke received BS and MS degrees in applied mathematics from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Karlsruhe, Germany. Previously, he worked as a researcher at Hewlett-Packard Laboratory, and as a research consultant at Xerox PARC. He has served on a number of technical advisory boards for startup companies.

  • Daniel Palanker

    Daniel Palanker

    Director of HEPL, Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInteractions of electric field and light with biological cells and tissues and their applications to imaging, diagnostics, therapeutics and prosthetics, primarily in ophthalmology.
    Specific fields of interest:
    Electronic retinal prosthesis;
    Electronic enhancement of tear secretion;
    Electronic control of blood vessels;
    Non-damaging retinal laser therapy;
    Ultrafast laser surgery;
    Interferometric imaging of neural signals;
    Cell transplantation and retinal plasticity.

  • Richard Pantell

    Richard Pantell

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioIn the past I have been interested in waves and diffusion in inhomogeneous or random media and in the mathematical analysis of multi-scale phenomena that arise in their study. Applications come from electromagnetic wave propagation in the atmosphere, underwater sound, waves in the lithosphere, diffusion in porous media, etc. I have studied both linear and nonlinear waves and diffusion, in both direct and inverse problems. I am now working on assessing multi-pathing effects in communication systems, especially when time reversal arrays are used. Another recent interest is financial mathematics, the use of asymptotics for stochastic equations in analyzing complex models of financial markets and in data analysis.

  • Bradford Parkinson

    Bradford Parkinson

    Edward C. Wells Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Bradford Parkinson was the Chief Architect for GPS, and led the original advocacy for the system in 1973 as an Air Force Colonel. Gaining approval, he became the first Director of the GPS Joint Program Office and led the original development of spacecraft, Master Control Station and 8 types of User Equipment. He continued leadership of the Program through the extensive test validation Program, including being the Launch Commander for the first GPS satellite launches. This original deployment of GPS demonstrated comfortable margins against all PNT (Positioning, Navigation, and Timing) requirements.
    Earlier in his career, he was a key developer of a modernized AC-130 Gunship, introduction of which included 160 hours of combat missions. He was an instructor at the USAF Test Pilot School. In addition he led the Department of Astronautics and Computer Science at the US Air Force Academy. He retired from the US Air Force as a Colonel.
    He was appointed a Professor at Stanford University in 1984, after six years of experience in industry. At Stanford University, he led the development of many innovative applications of GPS, including:
    1.Commercial aircraft (Boeing 737) blind landing using GPS alone,
    2.Fully automatic GPS control of Farm Tractors on a rough field to an accuracy of 2 inches,
    3.Pioneering the augmentation to GPS (WAAS) that allows any user to achieve accuracies of 2 feet and very high levels of integrity assurance.
    He has been the CEO of two companies, and serves on many boards. He is the editor/author of the AIAA Award winning 2 Volumes: “GPS Theory and Applications” and is author or coauthor of over 80 technical papers.
    Among his many awards is the Draper Prize of the National Academy of Engineering, considered by some to be the “Engineering Nobel”.

  • M Elisabeth Pate-Cornell

    M Elisabeth Pate-Cornell

    The Burton J. and DeeDee McMurtry Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioDr. Marie-Elisabeth Paté-Cornell is the Burt and Deedee McMurtry Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor and Founding Chair (2000-2011) of the Department of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University. Her specialty is engineering risk analysis with application to complex systems (space, medical, offshore oil platforms, etc.). Her earlier research has focused on the optimization of warning systems and the explicit inclusion of human and organizational factors in the analysis of systems’ failure risks. Her recent work is on the use of game theory in risk analysis with applications that have included counter-terrorism, nuclear counter-proliferation problems and cyber security. She is the author of more than one hundred publications, and the co-editor of a book on Perspectives on Complex Global Problems (2016).

    She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, of the French Académie des Technologies, of the NASA Advisory Council and of several boards including the Board of Advisors of the Naval Postgraduate School and the Navy War College. Dr. Paté-Cornell was a member of the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board from December 2001 to 2008, of the board of the Aerospace Corporation (2004-2013) of Draper Laboratory (2009-2016), and of InQtel (2006-2017). She holds a BS in Mathematics and Physics, Marseille (France), an Engineering degree (Applied Math/CS) from the Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble (France), an MS in Operations Research and a PhD in Engineering-Economic Systems, both from Stanford University.