School of Engineering


Showing 1-32 of 32 Results

  • Grace Gao

    Grace Gao

    Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioGrace Gao is an assistant professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. She leads the Navigation and Autonomous Vehicles Laboratory (NAV Lab). Before joining Stanford University, she was faculty at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She obtained her Ph.D. degree at Stanford University. Her research is on robust and secure perception, localization and navigation with applications to manned and unmanned aerial vehicles, autonomous driving cars, as well as space robotics.

    Prof. Gao has won a number of awards, including the NSF CAREER Award, the Institute of Navigation Early Achievement Award and the RTCA William E. Jackson Award. She received the Inspiring Early Academic Career Award by Stanford University, and Distinguished Promotion Award from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She has won Best Paper/Presentation of the Session Awards 29 times at Institute of Navigation conferences over the span of 17 years. She received the Dean's Award for Excellence in Research from the College of Engineering, University of Illinois. For her teaching and advising, Prof. Gao has been on the List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent by Their Students at University of Illinois multiple times. She won the College of Engineering Everitt Award for Teaching Excellence, the Engineering Council Award for Excellence in Advising, and AIAA Illinois Chapter’s Teacher of the Year. Prof. Gao also received AIAA Stanford Chapter Advisor of the Year Award in 2022; Teacher of the Year Award in 2023.

  • Xiaojing Gao

    Xiaojing Gao

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow do we design biological systems as “smart medicine” that sense patients’ states, process the information, and respond accordingly? To realize this vision, we will tackle fundamental challenges across different levels of complexity, such as (1) protein components that minimize their crosstalk with human cells and immunogenicity, (2) biomolecular circuits that function robustly in different cells and are easy to deliver, (3) multicellular consortia that communicate through scalable channels, and (4) therapeutic modules that interface with physiological inputs/outputs. Our engineering targets include biomolecules, molecular circuits, viruses, and cells, and our approach combines quantitative experimental analysis with computational simulation. The molecular tools we build will be applied to diverse fields such as neurobiology and cancer therapy.

  • Matthias Garten

    Matthias Garten

    Assistant Professor of Microbiology and of Bioengineering

    BioMatthias Garten, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the department of Immunology and Microbiology and the department of Bioengineering. He is a membrane biophysicist who is driven by the question of how the malaria parasite interfaces with its host-red blood cell, how we can use the unique mechanisms of the parasite to treat malaria and to re-engineer cells for biomedical applications.

    He obtained a physics master's degree from the Dresden University of Technology, Germany with a thesis in the laboratory of Dr. Petra Schwille and his Ph.D. life sciences from the University Paris Diderot, France through his work in the lab of Dr. Patricia Bassereau (Insitut Curie) investigating electrical properties of lipid membranes and protein - membrane interactions using biomimetic model systems, giant liposomes and planar lipid membranes.

    In his post-doctoral work at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda in the laboratory of Dr. Joshua Zimmerberg, he used molecular, biophysical and quantitative approaches to research the malaria parasite. His work led to the discovery of structure-function relationships that govern the host cell – parasite interface, opening research avenues to understand how the parasite connects to and controls its host cell.

  • Michael Genesereth

    Michael Genesereth

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    BioGenesereth is most known for his work on Computational Logic and applications of that work in Enterprise Management, Computational Law, and General Game Playing. He is one of the founders of Teknowledge, CommerceNet, Mergent Systems, and Symbium. Genesereth is the director of the Logic Group at Stanford and the founder and research director of CodeX - the Stanford Center for Legal Informatics.

  • J. Christian Gerdes

    J. Christian Gerdes

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioChris Gerdes is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University and Co-Director of the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford (CARS). His laboratory studies how cars move, how humans drive cars and how to design future cars that work cooperatively with the driver or drive themselves. When not teaching on campus, he can often be found at the racetrack with students, trying out their latest prototypes for the future. Vehicles in the lab include X1, an entirely student-built test vehicle; Niki, a Volkswagen GTI capable of turning a competitive lap time around the track without a human driver; and Marty, our electrified, automated, drifting DeLorean. Chris' interests in vehicle safety extend to ethics and government policy, having helped to develop the US Federal Automated Vehicle Policy while serving as the first Chief Innovation Officer of the US Department of Transportation.

  • Margot Gerritsen

    Margot Gerritsen

    Professor of Energy Resources Engineering, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My work is about understanding and simulating complicated fluid flow problems. My research focuses on the design of highly accurate and efficient parallel computational methods to predict the performance of enhanced oil recovery methods. I'm particularly interested in gas injection and in-situ combustion processes. These recovery methods are extremely challenging to simulate because of the very strong nonlinearities in the governing equations. Outside petroleum engineering, I'm active in coastal ocean simulation with colleagues from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, yacht research and pterosaur flight mechanics with colleagues from the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, and the design of search algorithms in collaboration with the Library of Congress and colleagues from the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering.

    Teaching
    I teach courses in both energy related topics (reservoir simulation, energy, and the environment) in my department, and mathematics for engineers through the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering (ICME). I also initiated two courses in professional development in our department (presentation skills and teaching assistant training), and a consulting course for graduate students in ICME, which offers expertise in computational methods to the Stanford community and selected industries.

    Professional Activities
    Senior Associate Dean, School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences, Stanford (from 2015); Director, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Stanford (from 2010); Stanford Fellow (2010-2012); Magne Espedal Professor II, Bergen University (2011-2014); Aldo Leopold Fellow (2009); Chair, SIAM Activity group in Geosciences (2007, present, reelected in 2009); Faculty Research Fellow, Clayman Institute (2008); Elected to Council of Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) (2007); organizing committee, 2008 Gordon Conference on Flow in Porous Media; producer, Smart Energy podcast channel; Director, Stanford Yacht Research; Co-director and founder, Stanford Center of Excellence for Computational Algorithms in Digital Stewardship; Editor, Journal of Small Craft Technology; Associate editor, Transport in Porous Media; Reviewer for various journals and organizations including SPE, DoE, NSF, Journal of Computational Physics, Journal of Scientific Computing, Transport in Porous Media, Computational Geosciences; member, SIAM, SPE, KIVI, AGU, and APS

  • James F Gibbons

    James F Gibbons

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioA pioneer in the use of ion implantation and rapid thermal process techniques for solid-state physics, Gibbons also conducts research into semiconductor device analysis, fabrication, and process physics. Current research is focused on the growth and processing of thin semiconductor films and nanostructures that offer potential for advanced semiconductor and optical device development.

  • Kay Giesecke

    Kay Giesecke

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsKay is a financial technologist whose research agenda is driven by significant applied problems in areas such as investment management, risk analytics, lending, and regulation, where data streams are increasingly large-scale and dynamical, and where computational demands are critical. He develops and analyzes statistical machine learning methods to make explainable data-driven decisions in these and other areas and efficient numerical algorithms to address the associated computational issues.

  • John Gill

    John Gill

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioGill's research interests are in the areas of computational complexity theory and information theory, including probabilistic computation, lossless data compression, and error correcting codes.

  • Bernd Girod

    Bernd Girod

    Robert L. and Audrey S. Hancock Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGirod's research focuses on algorithms and systems for multimedia analysis and communication. Applications range from wireless media delivery to interactive video streaming to mobile visual search and augmented reality.

  • Siegfried Glenzer

    Siegfried Glenzer

    Professor of Photon Science and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering
    On Leave from 09/15/2023 To 09/14/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPlease see our website for detailed information: https://heds.slac.stanford.edu

  • Gary Glover

    Gary Glover

    Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab) and, by courtesy, of Psychology and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy present research is devoted to the advancement of functional magnetic resonance imaging sciences for applications in basic understanding of the brain in health and disease. We collaborate closely with departmental clinicians and with others in the school of medicine, humanities, and the engineering sciences.

  • Peter Glynn

    Peter Glynn

    Thomas W. Ford Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStochastic modeling; statistics; simulation; finance

  • Ashish Goel

    Ashish Goel

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioAshish Goel is a Professor of Management Science and Engineering and (by courtesy) Computer Science at Stanford University. He received his PhD in Computer Science from Stanford in 1999, and was an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Southern California from 1999 to 2002. His research interests lie in the design, analysis, and applications of algorithms.

  • Andrea Goldsmith

    Andrea Goldsmith

    Stephen Harris Professor in the School of Engineering, Emerita

    BioAndrea Goldsmith is the Dean of Engineering and Applied Science and the Arthur LeGrand Doty Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Princeton University. She was previously the Stephen Harris Professor of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, where she is now Harris Professor Emerita. Her research interests are in information theory, communication theory, and signal processing, and their application to wireless communications, interconnected systems, and biomedical devices. She founded and served as Chief Technical Officer of Plume WiFi (formerly Accelera, Inc.) and of Quantenna (QTNA), Inc, and she serves on the Board of Directors for Intel (INTC), Medtronic (MDT), Crown Castle Inc (CCI), and the Marconi Society. She also serves on the Presidential Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST). Dr. Goldsmith is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Royal Academy of Engineering, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is a Fellow of the IEEE and has received several awards for her work, including the Marconi Prize, the ACM Sigmobile Outstanding Contribution Award, the IEEE Sumner Technical Field Award, the ACM Athena Lecturer Award, the ComSoc Armstrong Technical Achievement Award, the Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award, the WICE Mentoring Award, and the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal’s Women of Influence Award. She is author of the book ``Wireless Communications'' and co-author of the books ``MIMO Wireless Communications,” “Principles of Cognitive Radio,” and “Machine Learning and Wireless Communications,” all published by Cambridge University Press, as well as an inventor on 29 patents. She received the B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from U.C. Berkeley.

    Dr. Goldsmith is the founding Chair of the IEEE Board of Directors Committee on Diversity and Inclusion. She served as President of the IEEE Information Theory Society in 2009, as founding Chair of its Student Committee, and as founding Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Information Theory. She has also served on the Board of Governors for both the IEEE Information Theory and Communications Societies. At Stanford she served as Chair of Stanford’s Faculty Senate and for multiple terms as a Senator, and on its Academic Council Advisory Board, Budget Group, Committee on Research, Planning and Policy Board, Commissions on Graduate and on Undergraduate Education, Faculty Women’s Forum Steering Committee, and Task Force on Women and Leadership.

  • Stuart Goodman, MD, PhD

    Stuart Goodman, MD, PhD

    The Robert L. and Mary Ellenburg Professor of Surgery and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs an academic orthopaedic surgeon, my interests center on adult reconstructive surgery, arthritis surgery, joint replacement, biomaterials, biocompatibility, tissue engineering, mesenchymal stem cells. Collaborative clinical, applied and basic research studies are ongoing.

  • Kenneth Goodson

    Kenneth Goodson

    Senior Associate Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs, Davies Family Provostial Professor, and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Goodson’s Nanoheat Lab studies heat transfer in electronic nanostructures, microfluidic heat sinks, and packaging, focussing on basic transport physics and practical impact for industry. We work closely with companies on novel cooling and packaging strategies for power devices, portables, ASICs, & data centers. At present, sponsors and collaborators include ARPA-E, the NSF POETS Center, SRC ASCENT, Google, Intel, Toyota, Ford, among others.

  • Catherine Gorle

    Catherine Gorle

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGorle's research focuses on the development of predictive flow simulations to support the design of sustainable buildings and cities. Specific topics of interest are the coupling of large- and small-scale models and experiments to quantify uncertainties related to the variability of boundary conditions, the development of uncertainty quantification methods for low-fidelity models using high-fidelity data, and the use of field measurements to validate and improve computational predictions.

  • Robert M Gray

    Robert M Gray

    Alcatel-Lucent Professor in Communications and Networking, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research falls in the intersection of Shannon information theory and signal processing. In particular, I am interested in the theory and design of block codes and sliding-block (or stationary or time-invariant) codes for data compression and their relation to each other. Block codes are far better understood and more widely used, but their lack of stationarity causes difficulties in theory and artifacts in practice. Very little is known about the design of good sliding-block codes, but the problem is known to be equivalent to the design of entropy-constrained simulators of complex random processes. I also do research in the history of information theory and signal processing, especially in the development of speech processing systems and real time signal processing.

  • Christopher Gregg

    Christopher Gregg

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Computer Science

    BioChris Gregg received his Ph.D. in Computer Engineering from the University of Virginia in 2012, has a Master's of Education from Harvard University (2002), and a BS in Electrical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University (1994). Prior to becoming a lecturer at Stanford, Chris was a lecturer in the computer science department at Tufts University, and prior to that he taught high school physics in Massachusetts and California for seven years. Chris was on active duty in the Navy for seven years, and remains as a Commander in the Navy Reserves in the Information Warfare / Cryptology community.

    Chris's research interests include computer architecture (specifically, general purpose computing on GPUs) and the pedagogy of computer science teaching and instruction.

  • Peter Griffin

    Peter Griffin

    Sr Research Engineer, Electrical Engineering

    BioPeter Griffin is an expert in microfabrication, having co-authored one of the most widely used textbooks in the area. A new version titled “Integrated Circuit Fabrication – Science and Technology” co-authored with Prof. Jim Plummer will be published in early 2024 by Cambridge University press (https://plummergriffinbook.stanford.edu/). He is an electrical engineer by training with a BE and ME from University College Cork, Ireland and a PhD from Stanford University. He remained at Stanford as a research scientist. For the past two decades, he has performed interdisciplinary work at the Stanford Genome Technology Center (SGTC) with a particular emphasis on digital microfluidics. He is particularly interested in how technology can contribute to bioengineering and was the lead author on major DARPA, NIH and SRC grants in various application areas. Griffin has enjoyed long term collaborations with leading researchers on those interdisciplinary grants which has made his time at Stanford very productive. Griffin’s current interest is on impedance measurements for diagnostics in the laboratory of Prof. Lars Steinmetz at SGTC.

  • Wendy Gu

    Wendy Gu

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioThe Gu Group studies the mechanical behavior of nanomaterials. We work at the intersection of solid mechanics, materials science and nano-chemistry. We research the unique properties of nanoscale metals, ceramics and nano-architected composites in order to design strong, tough and lightweight structural materials, materials for extreme environments, and mechanically-actuated sensors. Our experimental tools include nanoindentation, electron microscopy, and colloidal synthesis.

  • Carlos Ernesto Guestrin

    Carlos Ernesto Guestrin

    Professor of Computer Science

    BioCarlos Guestrin is a Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University. His previous positions include the Amazon Professor of Machine Learning at the Computer Science & Engineering Department of the University of Washington, the Finmeccanica Associate Professor at Carnegie Mellon University, and the Senior Director of Machine Learning and AI at Apple, after the acquisition of Turi, Inc. (formerly GraphLab and Dato) — Carlos co-founded Turi, which developed a platform for developers and data scientist to build and deploy intelligent applications. He is a technical advisor for OctoML.ai. His team also released a number of popular open-source projects, including XGBoost, LIME, Apache TVM, MXNet, Turi Create, GraphLab/PowerGraph, SFrame, and GraphChi.

    Carlos received the IJCAI Computers and Thought Award and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). He is also a recipient of the ONR Young Investigator Award, NSF Career Award, Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, and IBM Faculty Fellowship, and was named one of the 2008 ‘Brilliant 10’ by Popular Science Magazine. Carlos’ work received awards at a number of conferences and journals, including ACL, AISTATS, ICML, IPSN, JAIR, JWRPM, KDD, NeurIPS, UAI, and VLDB. He is a former member of the Information Sciences and Technology (ISAT) advisory group for DARPA.

  • Leonidas Guibas

    Leonidas Guibas

    Paul Pigott Professor of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeometric and topological data analysis and machine learning. Algorithms for the joint analysis of collections of images, 3D models, or trajectories. 3D reconstruction.