School of Engineering


Showing 1-10 of 41 Results

  • Joseph Kahn

    Joseph Kahn

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioJoseph M. Kahn is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. His research addresses communication and imaging through optical fibers, including modulation, detection, signal processing and spatial multiplexing. He received A.B. and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from U.C. Berkeley in 1981 and 1986. From 1987-1990, he was at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Crawford Hill Laboratory, in Holmdel, NJ. He was on the Electrical Engineering faculty at U.C. Berkeley from 1990-2003. In 2000, he co-founded StrataLight Communications, which was acquired by Opnext, Inc. in 2009. He received the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1991 and is a Fellow of the IEEE.

  • Thomas Kailath

    Thomas Kailath

    Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioThomas Kailath obtained a B.E.(Telecom) degree from the College of Engineering in Pune, India, in !956 and M.S. (1959) and Sc.D. (1961) degrees in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    After a year at the Jet Propulsion Laboratories, he joined Stanford University in 1963 as an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, was promoted to Professor in 1968, and named to the Hitachi America Chair in 1988. He assumed Emeritus status in June 2001. His research has spanned a large number of engineering and mathematical disciplines, and he has mentored over a hundred doctoral and postdoctoral students. Their joint efforts have led to over 300 journal papers, several of which have received outstanding paper prizes; they have also led to a dozen patents and to several books and monographs. He has also co-founded and served as a director of several private and public high-technology companies. and has been

    He is a fellow of the IEEE and a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, the US National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Indian National Academy of Engineering, the Academy of Sciences of the Developing World and the Royal Spanish Academy of Engineering. In 2006, he was inducted into the Silicon Valley Engineering Hall of Fame.

    Other major honors include several IEEE medals and prizes, including the 2007 Medal of Honor in 2007, Guggenheim and Churchill Fellowships, and honorary degrees from universities in Sweden, Scotland, Spain and France.

  • Barbara A. Karanian, Ph.D./School of Engineering

    Barbara A. Karanian, Ph.D./School of Engineering

    Lecturer, previously visiting Professor

    BioBarbara A. Karanian, Ph.D. Lecturer and previously visiting Professor. Barbara's research focuses on four areas: 1) grounding a blend of theories from social-cognitive psychology, engineering design, and art to show how cognition affects design decisions; 2) changing the way people understand how emotions and motivation influence their work; 3) shifting norms of leaders involved in entrepreneurial minded action; 4) developing teaching methods with a storytelling focus in engineering education.

    Barbara teaches and studies how a person’s behavior at work is framed around a blend of applied theoretical perspectives from social psychology and cognitive psychology; engineering design thinking and art. Her storytelling methods provides a form to explore and discover the practices of inquiry and apply them to how individuals behave within organizations, and the ways organizations face challenges. Active storytelling and self-reflective observation helps student and industry leaders to iterate and progress from the early idea phases of projects to reality. Founder of the Design Entrepreneuring Studio (http://web.stanford.edu/~karanian/ ) Barbara is the author of, "Working Connection: The Relational Art of Leadership;" "Entrepreneurial Leadership: A Balancing Act in Engineering and Science;" and "Designing for Social Participation in the Virtual Universe." In her Stanford courses: ME 378, Tell/Make/Engage - action stories for entrepreneuring class, 'Story' is defined two ways: 1) a story is a form for creating successful engagement strategies and alignment; and 2) storytelling as rapid prototyping - proven methods for iterative development across stages of a research project, a dissertation, changes in career path, or starting-up a company. With her students, she co-authored, "The Power of First Moments in Entrepreneurial Storytelling." Her findings show that the characteristic of vulnerability amplifies engagement. For ME 236 class- Tales to Design Cars By- the opportunity to investigate a person’s relationship with cars through the application of research, design thinking, and with a generative storytelling focus-students find the inspiration for designing a new automotive experience. For ME 243 Designing Emotion (for Reactive Car Interfaces) students learn to "know" emotion by operationally defining emotions in self and other: to decipher the role and impact of emotion in the future driving or mobility experience.
    Barbara makes productive partnerships with industry and creates collaborative teams with members from the areas of engineering, design, psychology, business, communication, and medicine. Her recent work examines: ways to generate creative work environments; motivators for modes of transportation; leader problem-solving for group effectiveness by iterating on an intelligent wall; and perceived differences in on-line and off-line lives. She also bridges the intersection of Silicon Valley and Hollywood in an initiative for building a predictive model using methods (like pre-visualization) for entrepreneurial storytelling success. Barbara received her B.A. in the double major of Experimental Psychology and Fine Arts from the College of the Holy Cross, her M.A. in Art Therapy from Lesley University, and her Ph.D. in Educational Studies in Organizational Behavior from Lesley University. She was a Teaching Fellow in Power and Leadership at Harvard University's GSE.

  • Riitta Katila

    Riitta Katila

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe question that drives Prof. Katila's research is how technology-based firms with significant resources can stay innovative. Her work lies at the intersection of the fields of technology, innovation, and strategy and focuses on strategies that enable organizations to discover, develop and commercialize technologies. She combines theory with longitudinal large-sample data (e.g., robotics, biomedical, multi-industry datasets), background fieldwork, and state-of-the-art quantitative methods. The ultimate objective is to understand what makes technology-based firms successful.

    To answer this question, Prof. Katila conducts two interrelated streams of research. She studies (1) strategies that help firms leverage their existing resources (leverage stream), and (2) strategies through which firms can acquire new resources (acquisition stream) to create innovation. Her early contributions were firm centric while recent contributions focus on innovation in the context of competitive interaction.

    Professor Katila's work has appeared in the Academy of Management Journal, Administrative Science Quarterly, Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, Strategic Management Journal, Research Policy and other outlets. In her most recent work, supported by the National Science Foundation, Katila examines how firms create new products successfully. Focusing on the robotics and medical device industries, she investigates how different search approaches, such as the exploitation of existing knowledge and the exploration for new knowledge, influence the kinds of new products that technology-intensive firms introduce. Professor Katila has served on the editorial boards of several leading journals including Administrative Science Quarterly, Organization Science, Strategic Organization, and the Strategic Management Journal.

  • Sachin Katti

    Sachin Katti

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Computer Science

    BioSachin Katti is currently an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Stanford University. He recently received his PhD in EECS from MIT in 2009. His research focuses on designing and building next generation high capacity wireless networks using techniques from information and coding theory. His dissertation research focused on redesigning wireless mesh networks with network coding as the central unifying design paradigm. The dissertation won the 2008 ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award - Honorable Mention, the George Sprowls Award for Best Doctoral Dissertation in EECS at MIT. His work on network coding was also awarded a MIT Deshpande Center Innovation Grant, and won the 2009 William Bennett Prize for Best Paper in IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. His research interests are in networks, wireless communications, applied coding theory and security.

  • Amit Kaushal

    Amit Kaushal

    Adjunct Professor

    BioAmit Kaushal, MD, PhD is Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine (Stanford-VA) and Adjunct Professor of Bioengineering at Stanford University. Dr. Kaushal's work spans clinical medicine, teaching, research, and industry.

    He helped launch Stanford School of Engineering's undergraduate major in Biomedical Computation (bmc.stanford.edu) and has served as long-time director of the major. The major has graduated over 70 students since inception and was recently featured in Nature (https://go.nature.com/2P2UnRu).

    His research interests are in utilizing health data in novel and ethical ways to improve the practice of medicine. He is a faculty executive member of Stanford's Partnership for AI-Assisted Care (aicare.stanford.edu). Recently, he has also been working with public health agencies to improve scale and speed of contact tracing for COVID-19.

    He has previously held executive and advisory roles at startups working at the interface of technology and healthcare.

    He continues to practice as an academic hospitalist.

    Dr. Kaushal completed his BS (Biomedical Computation), MD, PhD (Biomedical Informatics), and residency training at Stanford. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Clinical Informatics.

  • Leonid Kazovsky

    Leonid Kazovsky

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Kazovsky and his research group are investigating green energy-efficient networks. The focus of their research is on access and in-building networks and on hybrid optical / wireless networks. Prof. Kazovsky's research group is also conducting research on next-generation Internet architectures and novel zero-energy photonic components.

  • David Kelley

    David Kelley

    Donald W. Whittier Professor in Mechanical Engineering

    BioDavid Kelley's work is dedicated to helping people gain confidence in their creative abilities. He employs a project based methodology called Design Thinking within both the Product Design Program and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design.

    Design Thinking is based on building empathy for user needs, developing solutions with iterative prototyping, and inspiring ideas for the future through storytelling.

    The Product Design program emphasizes the blending of engineering innovation, human values, and manufacturing concerns into a single curriculum. Kelley teaches engineering design methodology, the techniques of quick prototyping to prove feasibility, and design through understanding of user needs.