School of Engineering


Showing 1-9 of 9 Results

  • Nick McKeown

    Nick McKeown

    Kleiner Perkins, Mayfield, and Sequoia Capital Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Computer Science

    BioMcKeown researches techniques to improve the Internet. Most of this work has focused on the architecture, design, analysis, and implementation of high-performance Internet switches and routers. More recently, his interests have broadened to include network architecture, backbone network design, congestion control; and how the Internet might be redesigned if we were to start with a clean slate.

  • Teresa Meng

    Teresa Meng

    Reid Weaver Dennis Professor in Electrical Engineering and Professor of Computer Science, Emerita

    BioTeresa H. Meng is the Reid Weaver Dennis Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emerita, at Stanford University. Her research activities in the first 10 years focused on low-power circuit and system design, video signal processing, and wireless communications. In 1998, Prof. Meng took leave from Stanford and founded Atheros Communications, Inc., which developed semiconductor system solutions for wireless network communications products. After returning to Stanford in 2000 to continue her teaching and research, Prof. Meng turned her research interest to applying signal processing and IC design to bio-medical engineering. She collaborated with Prof. Krishna Shenoy on neural signal processing and neural prosthetic systems. She also directed a research group exploring wireless power transfer and implantable bio-medical devices. Prof. Meng retired from Stanford in 2013.

  • David Miller

    David Miller

    W.M. Keck Foundation Professor of Electrical Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDavid Miller’s research interests include the use of optics in switching, interconnection, communications, computing, and sensing systems, physics and applications of quantum well optics and optoelectronics, and fundamental features and limits for optics and nanophotonics in communications and information processing.

  • John Mitchell

    John Mitchell

    Mary and Gordon Crary Family Professor in the School of Engineering, and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering and of Education

    BioJohn Mitchell is the Mary and Gordon Crary Family Professor, professor of computer science, and by courtesy professor of electrical engineering and professor of education. He was previously appointed as Stanford Vice Provost for Online Learning (2012-2015) and Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning (2015-2018). His team worked with more than 500 Stanford faculty members and instructors on over 1,000 online projects for campus or public audiences and organized the Year of Learning to envision the future of teaching and learning at Stanford and beyond. As co-director of the Lytics Lab and Carta Lab, he worked to improve educational outcomes through data-driven research and iterative design.

    Recent interviews and articles for the general public include: The Ethics of Emerging Technologies (podcast with Tom Byers and Mildred Cho), Aspen Institute Forum for the Future of Higher Education Interview Series - John Mitchell, and School of Engineering Interviews ”How can we improve online learning?” and “How can we design for security?.”

    Mitchell’s past research has focused on computer security, including network protocols, web security, and privacy, as well as programming languages and applications of mathematical logic to computer science. Relevant publications include Reinforcement Learning for the Adaptive Scheduling of Educational Activities (CHI 2020), Automated Analysis of Cryptographic Assumptions in Generic Group Models (J. Cryptology, 2019), Evaluating the privacy properties of telephone metadata (PNAS 2016), Third-party web tracking: Policy and technology (IEEE S&P). He is the author of two textbooks, Foundations for Programming Languages (1996) and Concepts in Programming Languages (2002); over 200 publications have received over 25,000 citations.

    Mitchell’s first research project in online learning started in 2009, when he and six undergraduate students built Stanford CourseWare, an innovative platform that expanded to support interactive video and discussion. CourseWare served as the foundation for initial flipped classroom experiments at Stanford and helped inspire the first massive open online courses (MOOCs) from Stanford. Professor Mitchell currently serves as Chair of the Stanford Department of Computer Science.

  • Andrea Montanari

    Andrea Montanari

    Robert and Barbara Kleist Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Statistics and, by courtesy, of Mathematics

    BioI am interested in developing efficient algorithms to make sense of large amounts of noisy data, extract information from observations, estimate signals from measurements. This effort spans several disciplines including statistics, computer science, information theory, machine learning.
    I am also working on applications of these techniques to healthcare data analytics.

  • Boris Murmann

    Boris Murmann

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioBoris Murmann is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He joined Stanford in 2004 after completing his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley in 2003. From 1994 to 1997, he was with Neutron Microelectronics, Germany, where he developed low-power and smart-power ASICs in automotive CMOS technology. Since 2004, he has worked as a consultant with numerous Silicon Valley companies. Dr. Murmann’s research interests are in mixed-signal integrated circuit design, with special emphasis on sensor interfaces, data converters and custom circuits for machine learning. In 2008, he was a co-recipient of the Best Student Paper Award at the VLSI Circuits Symposium and a recipient of the Best Invited Paper Award at the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference (CICC). He received the Agilent Early Career Professor Award in 2009 and the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award in 2012. He has served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, as well as the Data Converter Subcommittee Chair and the Technical Program Chair of the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC). He is the founding faculty co-director of the Stanford SystemX Alliance and the faculty director of Stanford's System Prototyping Facility (SPF). He is a Fellow of the IEEE.