School of Engineering


Showing 1-20 of 152 Results

  • Sara Achour

    Sara Achour

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am an Assistant Professor jointly appointed to both the Computer Science and the Electrical Engineering Departments at Stanford University. My research focuses on new techniques and tools, specifically new programming languages, compilers, and runtime systems, that enable end-users to more easily develop computations that exploit the potential of emerging computing platforms that exhibit analog behaviors.

  • Maneesh Agrawala

    Maneesh Agrawala

    Forest Baskett Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsComputer Graphics, Human Computer Interaction and Visualization.

  • Amin Arbabian

    Amin Arbabian

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy group's research covers RF circuits and system design for (1) biomedical, (2) sensing, and (3) Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

  • Nicholas Bambos

    Nicholas Bambos

    Richard W. Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioNick Bambos is R. Weiland Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University, having a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Management Science & Engineering. He has been the Fortinet Founders Department Chair of the Management Science & Engineering Department (2016 – 20).

    He heads the Computer Systems Performance Engineering Lab (Perf-Lab) at Stanford, comprised of doctoral students and industry visitors engaged in various research projects, and was the Director (1999 – 2005) of the Stanford Networking Research Center (a research project of about $30M). He has published over 300 peer-reviewed research publications and graduated over 40 doctoral students (including two post-doctoral ones), who have moved on to leadership positions in academia, the Silicon Valley industries and technology startups, finance and venture capital, etc.

    His research interests are in architecture and high-performance engineering of computer systems and networks, as well as data analytics with an emphasis on medical and health-care analytics. His research contributions span the areas of networking and the Internet, cloud computing and data centers, multimedia streaming, computer security, digital health, etc. His methodological interests and contributions span the areas of network control, online task scheduling, routing and distributed processing, machine learning and artificial intelligence, etc.

    He received his Ph.D. (1989) in Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences from the University of California at Berkeley. Before joining Stanford in 1996, he served as assistant professor (1989 – 95) and tenured associate professor (1995 – 96) of Electrical Engineering at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA).

    He has received several best research paper awards and has been the Cisco Systems Faculty Development Chair and the David Morgenthaler Faculty Scholar at Stanford. He has won the IBM Faculty Award, as well as the National Young Investigator Award and the Research Initiation Award from the National Science Foundation. He has been a Berkeley U.C. Regents Fellow, an E. C. Anthony Fellow, and a D. & S. Gale Fellow.

    He has served on various editorial boards of research journals, scientific boards of research labs, international technical and scientific committees, and technical review panels for networking and computing technologies. He has also served on corporate technical boards, as consultant and co-founder of technology start-up companies, and as expert witness in high-profile patent litigation and other legal cases involving information technologies.

  • Mohsen Bayati

    Mohsen Bayati

    Carl and Marilynn Thoma Professor in the Graduate School of Business and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) Healthcare management: I am interested in improving healthcare delivery using data-driven modeling and decision-making.

    2) Network models and message-passing algorithms: I work on graphical modeling ideas motivated from statistical physics and their applications in statistical inference.

    3) Personalized decision-making: I work on machine learning and statistical challenges of personalized decision-making. The problems that I have worked on are primarily motivated by healthcare applications.

  • Stacey Bent

    Stacey Bent

    Vice Provost, Graduate Education & Postdoc Affairs, Jagdeep & Roshni Singh Professor in the School of Engineering, Professor of Energy Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Eng, Materials Sci Eng & Chemistry

    BioThe research in the Bent laboratory is focused on understanding and controlling surface and interfacial chemistry and applying this knowledge to a range of problems in semiconductor processing, micro- and nano-electronics, nanotechnology, and sustainable and renewable energy. Much of the research aims to develop a molecular-level understanding in these systems, and hence the group uses of a variety of molecular probes. Systems currently under study in the group include functionalization of semiconductor surfaces, mechanisms and control of atomic layer deposition, molecular layer deposition, nanoscale materials for light absorption, interface engineering in photovoltaics, catalyst and electrocatalyst deposition.

  • Kwabena Boahen

    Kwabena Boahen

    Professor of Bioengineering and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBoahen's group analyzes neural behavior computationally to elucidate principles of neural design at the cellular, circuit, and systems levels; and synthesizes neuromorphic electronic systems that scale energy-use with size as efficiently as the brain does. This interdisciplinary research program bridges neurobiology and medicine with electronics and computer science, bringing together these seemingly disparate fields.

  • Dan Boneh

    Dan Boneh

    Cryptography Professor, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioProfessor Boneh heads the applied cryptography group and co-direct the computer security lab. Professor Boneh's research focuses on applications of cryptography to computer security. His work includes cryptosystems with novel properties, web security, security for mobile devices, and cryptanalysis. He is the author of over a hundred publications in the field and is a Packard and Alfred P. Sloan fellow. He is a recipient of the 2014 ACM prize and the 2013 Godel prize. In 2011 Dr. Boneh received the Ishii award for industry education innovation. Professor Boneh received his Ph.D from Princeton University and joined Stanford in 1997.

  • Stephen Boyd

    Stephen Boyd

    Samsung Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioStephen P. Boyd is the Samsung Professor of Engineering, and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Information Systems Laboratory at Stanford University, and a member of the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering. His current research focus is on convex optimization applications in control, signal processing, machine learning, and finance.

    Professor Boyd received an AB degree in Mathematics, summa cum laude, from Harvard University in 1980, and a PhD in EECS from U. C. Berkeley in 1985. In 1985 he joined Stanford's Electrical Engineering Department. He has held visiting Professor positions at Katholieke University (Leuven), McGill University (Montreal), Ecole Polytechnique Federale (Lausanne), Tsinghua University (Beijing), Universite Paul Sabatier (Toulouse), Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm), Kyoto University, Harbin Institute of Technology, NYU, MIT, UC Berkeley, CUHK-Shenzhen, and IMT Lucca. He holds honorary doctorates from Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm, and Catholic University of Louvain (UCL).

    Professor Boyd is the author of many research articles and four books: Introduction to Applied Linear Algebra: Vectors, Matrices, and Least-Squares (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 2018), Convex Optimization (with Lieven Vandenberghe, 2004), Linear Matrix Inequalities in System and Control Theory (with El Ghaoui, Feron, and Balakrishnan, 1994), and Linear Controller Design: Limits of Performance (with Craig Barratt, 1991). His group has produced many open source tools, including CVX (with Michael Grant), CVXPY (with Steven Diamond) and Convex.jl (with Madeleine Udell and others), widely used parser-solvers for convex optimization.

    He has received many awards and honors for his research in control systems engineering and optimization, including an ONR Young Investigator Award, a Presidential Young Investigator Award, and the AACC Donald P. Eckman Award. In 2013, he received the IEEE Control Systems Award, given for outstanding contributions to control systems engineering, science, or technology. In 2012, Michael Grant and he were given the Mathematical Optimization Society's Beale-Orchard-Hays Award, for excellence in computational mathematical programming. In 2023, he was given the AACC Richard E. Bellman Control Heritage Award, the highest recognition of professional achievement for U.S. control systems engineers and scientists. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, SIAM, INFORMS, and IFAC, a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Control Systems Society, a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, a foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering, and a foreign member of the National Academy of Engineering of Korea. He has been invited to deliver more than 90 plenary and keynote lectures at major conferences in control, optimization, signal processing, and machine learning.

    He has developed and taught many undergraduate and graduate courses, including Signals & Systems, Linear Dynamical Systems, Convex Optimization, and a recent undergraduate course on Matrix Methods. His graduate convex optimization course attracts around 300 students from more than 20 departments. In 1991 he received an ASSU Graduate Teaching Award, and in 1994 he received the Perrin Award for Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching in the School of Engineering. In 2003, he received the AACC Ragazzini Education award, for contributions to control education. In 2016 he received the Walter J. Gores award, the highest award for teaching at Stanford University. In 2017 he received the IEEE James H. Mulligan, Jr. Education Medal, for a career of outstanding contributions to education in the fields of interest of IEEE, with citation "For inspirational education of students and researchers in the theory and application of optimization."

  • Emmanuel Candes

    Emmanuel Candes

    Barnum-Simons Chair of Math and Statistics, and Professor of Statistics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioEmmanuel Candès is the Barnum-Simons Chair in Mathematics and Statistics, a professor of electrical engineering (by courtesy) and a member of the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering at Stanford University. Earlier, Candès was the Ronald and Maxine Linde Professor of Applied and Computational Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology. His research interests are in computational harmonic analysis, statistics, information theory, signal processing and mathematical optimization with applications to the imaging sciences, scientific computing and inverse problems. He received his Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University in 1998.

    Candès has received several awards including the Alan T. Waterman Award from NSF, which is the highest honor bestowed by the National Science Foundation, and which recognizes the achievements of early-career scientists. He has given over 60 plenary lectures at major international conferences, not only in mathematics and statistics but in many other areas as well including biomedical imaging and solid-state physics. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2014.

  • E.J. Chichilnisky

    E.J. Chichilnisky

    John R. Adler Professor, Professor of Neurosurgery and of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunctional circuitry of the retina and design of retinal prostheses

  • Joonhee Choi

    Joonhee Choi

    Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioJoonhee Choi is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Joonhee received his Ph.D. and master’s from Harvard University, as well as master’s and bachelor’s degrees from Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology. Prior to joining Stanford, he worked as an IQIM postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Quantum Information and Matter (IQIM) at Caltech. Joonhee’s research focus has been on engineering the dynamics of quantum many-body systems for both exploring fundamental science and demonstrating practical quantum applications. Throughout his career, he has worked in a wide variety of fields, including nonlinear nano-optics, ultrafast phenomena, solid-state and atomic physics, as well as quantum many-body physics. His expertise extends to practical applications in quantum metrology, communication, and information processing.

  • John M. Cioffi

    John M. Cioffi

    Hitachi America Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioJohn M. Cioffi teaches Stanford's graduate electrical engineering course sequence in digital communications, part-time as recalled emeritus presently, from 1986 to the present. Cioffi's research interests are in the theory of transmitting the highest possible data rates on a number of different communications channels, many of which efforts spun out of Stanford through he and/or his many former PhD students to companies, most notably including the basic designed globally used 500 million DSL connections. Cioffi also oversaw the prototype developments for the worlds first cable modem and digital-audio broadcast systems. Cioffi pioneering the use of remote management algorithms to improve (over the internet or cloud) both wireline (DSL) and wireless (Wi-Fi) physical-layer transmission performance, an area often known as Dynamic Spectrum Management or Dynamic Line Management. Cioffi is co-inventor on basic patents for vectored DSL transmission and optimized MIMO wireless transmission. In his early career, Cioffi developed the worlds first full-duplex voiceband data modem while at Bell Laboratories, and the worlds first adaptively equalized disk read channel while at IBM. His courses and research projects over the years center on the area of multiuser transmission methods.

  • Todd Coleman

    Todd Coleman

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioTodd P. Coleman is an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering, and by courtesy, Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received B.S. degrees in electrical engineering (summa cum laude), as well as computer engineering (summa cum laude) from the University of Michigan (Go Blue). He received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from MIT in electrical engineering and computer science. He did postdoctoral studies at MIT and Mass General Hospital in quantitative neuroscience. He previously was a faculty member in the Departments of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Bioengineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and the University of California, San Diego, respectively. Dr. Coleman’s research is very multi-disciplinary, using tools from applied probability, physiology, and bioelectronics. Examples include, for instance, optimal transport methods in high-dimensional uncertainty quantification and developing technologies and algorithms to monitor and modulate physiology of the nervous systems in the brain and visceral organs. He has served as a Principal Investigator on grants from the NSF, NIH, Department of Defense, and multiple private foundations. Dr. Coleman is an inventor on 10 granted US patents. He has been selected as a Gilbreth Lecturer for the National Academy of Engineering, a TEDMED speaker, and a Fellow of IEEE as well as the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. He is currently the Chair of the National Academies Standing Committee on Biotechnology Capabilities and National Security Needs.

  • Daniel Norbert Congreve

    Daniel Norbert Congreve

    Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioDan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Prior to Stanford, Dan received his B.S. and M.S. from Iowa State in 2011, working with Vik Dalal studying defect densities of nano-crystalline and amorphous silicon. He then received his PhD from MIT in Electrical Engineering in 2015, studying under Marc Baldo. His thesis work focused on photonic energy conversion using singlet fission and triplet fusion as downconverting and upconverting processes, respectively. He spent a year as a postdoc with Will Tisdale in Chemical Engineering at MIT studying perovskite nanoplatelets. He joined the Rowland Institute in 2016 as a Rowland Fellow before starting at Stanford in 2020. Dan is a Moore Inventor Fellow, Sloan Research Fellow, Intel Rising Star, and co-founder of Quadratic3D, a startup looking to commercialize 3D printing technologies. His current research interests focus on engineering nanomaterials to solve challenging problems.

  • Adam de la Zerda

    Adam de la Zerda

    Associate Professor of Structural Biology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular imaging technologies for studying cancer biology in vivo