School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 12 Results

  • Alvan Ikoku

    Alvan Ikoku

    Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIkoku's research traces confluences in science and literature that have long constituted modern medical and ethics discourse — dating from the mid-nineteenth century to the present period, and particularly where Africa and its diaspora are points of representation

    His scholarship has thus been in three areas. First, work that details the place of colonial, postcolonial, and world literatures in the evolution of tropical medicine and global health as medical fields, with writing on malaria and Africa as a primary focus. His current book, Forms of Global Health, and a forthcoming article, 'Reading Malaria Literature,' are part of this research, as is previous writing for the World Health Organization. Second, a series of long articles that detail efforts by writers of African descent to examine space, race and gender as genres of self-governance. And third, work that traces the emergence of modern fiction as an alternative mode for ethical thought regarding humane care and human subjects research. Here, he has published with Virtual Mentor as well as Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics, and he is developing a second book project on the Literature of Human Experimentation.

    Finally, Ikoku's research has been supported by the Mellon Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy, Columbia University Research Grants, the Marjorie Hope Nicolson Fellowship, and the Rhodes Trust.

  • Jamie Imam

    Jamie Imam

    Lecturer, Biology

    BioDr. Jamie Imam received her Bachelors degree in Biological Sciences and Psychology from Carnegie Mellon University and her Ph.D. in Genetics from the Stanford School of Medicine. In addition to teaching, Jamie is the Coordinator of the Honors Program in Biology. When she is not teaching or doing science outreach, she enjoys reading, baking and spending time outdoors with her family.

  • Miyako Inoue

    Miyako Inoue

    Associate Professor of Anthropology and, by courtesy, of Linguistics

    BioMiyako Inoue teaches linguistic anthropology and the anthropology of Japan. She also has a courtesy appointment with the Department of Linguistics.

    Her first book, titled, Vicarious Language: the Political Economy of Gender and Speech in Japan (University of California Press), examines a phenomenon commonly called "women's language" in Japanese modern society, and offers a genealogy showing its critical linkage with Japan's national and capitalist modernity. Professor Inoue is currently working on a book-length project on a social history of “verbatim” in Japanese. She traces the historical development of the Japanese shorthand technique used in the Diet for its proceedings since the late 19th century, and of the stenographic typewriter introduced to the Japanese court for the trial record after WWII. She is interested in learning what it means to be faithful to others by coping their speech, and how the politico-semiotic rationality of such stenographic modes of fidelity can be understood as a technology of a particular form of governance, namely, liberal governance. Publication that has come out of her current project includes, "Stenography and Ventriloquism in Late Nineteenth Century Japan." Language & Communication 31.3 (2011).

    Professor Inoue's research interest: linguistic anthropology, sociolinguistics, semiotics, linguistic modernity, anthropology of writing, inscription devices, materialities of language, social organizations of documents (filing systems, index cards, copies, archives, paperwork), voice/sound/noise, soundscape, technologies of liberalism, gender, urban studies, Japan, East Asia.

  • John P.A. Ioannidis

    John P.A. Ioannidis

    C. F. Rehnborg Professor in Disease Prevention in the School of Medicine and Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and, by courtesy, of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMeta-research
    Evidence-based medicine
    Clinical and molecular epidemiology
    Human genome epidemiology
    Research design
    Reporting of research
    Empirical evaluation of bias in research
    Randomized trials
    Statistical methods and modeling
    Meta-analysis and large-scale evidence
    Prognosis, predictive and personalized medicine and health
    Sociology of science

  • Kent Irwin

    Kent Irwin

    Professor of Physics, of Particle Physics and Astrophysics and of Photon Science

    BioKent Irwin has a joint faculty appointment with the Physics Department and the Particle Physics and Astrophysics and Photon Science Departments of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. He joins Stanford from the National Institute of Standards and Technology at Boulder, Colorado, where his research focused on experiments to probe the nature of dark matter and dark energy, gravity at large scales, the mass and number of neutrino species, the characteristics of inflation and the cosmic gravity wave background, and the evolution of structure and disposition of baryonic matter in the universe.

  • Shanto Iyengar

    Shanto Iyengar

    Professor of Political Science, of Communication and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    BioShanto Iyengar holds the Chandler Chair in Communication at Stanford University where he is also Professor of Political Science and Director of the Political Communication Laboratory. Iyengar’s areas of expertise include the role of mass media in democratic societies, public opinion, and political psychology. Iyengar’s research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Ford Foundation, the Pew Charitable Trusts, and the Hewlett Foundation. He is the recipient of several professional awards including the Philip Converse Award of the American Political Science Association for the best book in the field of public opinion, the Murray Edelman Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Goldsmith Book Prize from Harvard University. Iyengar is author or co-author of several books, including News That Matters (University of Chicago Press, 1987), Is Anyone Responsible? (University of Chicago Press, 1991), Explorations in Political Psychology (Duke University Press, 1995), Going Negative (Free Press, 1995), and Media Politics: A Citizen’s Guide (Norton, 2011).