School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-33 of 33 Results

  • Nicholas Haber

    Nicholas Haber

    Assistant Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI use AI models of of exploratory and social learning in order to better understand early human learning and development, and conversely, I use our understanding of early human learning to make robust AI models that learn in exploratory and social ways. Based on this, I develop AI-powered learning tools for children, geared in particular towards the education of those with developmental issues such as the Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, in the mold of my work on the Autism Glass Project. My formal graduate training in pure mathematics involved extending partial differential equation theory in cases involving the propagation of waves through complex media such as the space around a black hole. Since then, I have transitioned to the use of machine learning in developing both learning tools for children with developmental disorders and AI and cognitive models of learning.

  • Stephen Haber

    Stephen Haber

    A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, Professor of History and, by courtesy, of Economics

    BioStephen Haber is A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He is also Professor of Political Science, Professor of History, and Professor of Economics (by courtesy), a Senior Fellow of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, and a Senior Fellow of the Stanford Center for International Development. Haber’s research spans a number of academic disciplines, including comparative politics, financial economics, and economic history. He has authored, coauthored, or edited ten books, and his papers have been published in journals such as American Political Science Review, World Politics, International Security, the Journal of Economic History, the Hispanic American Historical Review, the Journal of Banking and Finance, and the Journal of International Business Studies. Haber's most recent book, Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit (coauthored with Charles Calomiris) was published by Princeton University Press in 2014. His current research focuses on two areas: the impact of geography on the long-run evolution of economic and political institutions; and the political conditions under which societies sustain intellectual property systems that promote innovation.

  • Heather Hadlock

    Heather Hadlock

    Associate Professor of Music

    BioHeather Hadlock studies 18th- and 19th-century French and Italian opera, with a focus on changing norms for representing masculinity in opera on nineteenth century stages and in contemporary productions of classic operas. Her research repertoire encompasses Italian bel canto opera, Berlioz, Offenbach, operatic masculinities, opera in the age of its digital mediation, and divas and technology. She approaches operatic voices and performance through feminist theories of difference, vocality, and embodiment; gender and sexuality studies; and dynamics of adaptation between opera, literature, and video. She has directed Stanford's interdisciplinary Program in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and served on the Phiip Brett Award committee and board of the AMS LGBTQ Study Group. She serves on the editorial board of the journal Nineteenth-Century Music.

  • James Hamilton

    James Hamilton

    Hearst Professor and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMedia economics, journalism, economics of regulation

  • Thomas Hansen

    Thomas Hansen

    Reliance-Dhirubhai Ambani Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAnthropology of political life, ethno-religious identities, violence and urban life in South Asia and Southern Africa. Multiple theoretical and disciplinary interests from political theory and continental philosophy to psychoanalysis, comparative religion and contemporary urbanism

  • Eric Hanushek

    Eric Hanushek

    Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, by courtesy at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioEric Hanushek is the Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. He has been a leader in the development of economic analysis of educational issues. His widely-cited research spans many policy-related education topics. His latest book, The Knowledge Capital of Nations: Education and the Economics of Growth, identifies the close link between the skills of the people and the economic growth of the nation. He has authored or edited 24 books along with over 250 articles. He is a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Air Force Academy and completed his Ph.D. in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (http://hanushek.stanford.edu/)

  • Keren Haroush

    Keren Haroush

    Assistant Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies the mechanisms by which highly complex behaviors are mediated at the neuronal level, mainly focusing on the example of dynamic social interactions and the neural circuits that drive them. From dyadic interactions to group dynamics and collective decision making, the lab seeks a mechanistic understanding for the fundamental building blocks of societies, such as cooperation, empathy, fairness and reciprocity.

  • Robert Harrison

    Robert Harrison

    Rosina Pierotti Professor of Italian Literature

    BioProfessor Harrison received his doctorate in Romance Studies from Cornell University in 1984, with a dissertation on Dante's Vita Nuova. In 1985 he accepted a visiting assistant professorship in the Department of French and Italian at Stanford. In 1986 he joined the faculty as an assistant professor. He was granted tenure in 1992 and was promoted to full professor in 1995. In 1997 Stanford offered him the Rosina Pierotti Chair of Italian Literature. In 2002, he was named chair of the Department of French and Italian. In 2006 he became a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. In 2014 he was knighted "Chevalier" by the French Republic. He is also lead guitarist for the cerebral rock band Glass Wave.

    Professor Harrison's first book, The Body of Beatrice, was published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 1988. The Body of Beatrice was translated into Japanese in 1994. Over the next few years Professor Harrison worked on his next book, Forests: The Shadow of Civilization, which appeared in 1992 with University of Chicago Press. This book deals with the multiple and complex ways in which the Western imagination has symbolized, represented, and conceived of forests, primarily in literature, religion, and mythology. It offers a select history that begins in antiquity and ends in our own time. Forests appeared simultaneously in English, French, Italian, and German. It subsequently appeared in Japanese and Korean as well. In 1994 his book Rome, la Pluie: A Quoi Bon Littérature? appeared in France, Italy, and Germany. This book is written in the form of dialogues between two characters and deals with various topics such as art restoration, the vocation of literature, and the place of the dead in contemporary society. Professor Harrison's next book, The Dominion of the Dead, published in 2003 by University of Chicago Press, deals with the relations the living maintain with the dead in diverse secular realms. This book was translated into German, French and Italian. Professor Harrison's book Gardens: An Essay on the Human Condition appeared in 2008 with the University of Chicago Press, and in French with Le Pommier (subsequently appeared in German and Chinese translations). His most recent book Juvenescence: A Cultural History of Our Age came out in 2014 with Chicago University Press. In 2005 Harrison started a literary talk show on KZSU radio called "Entitled Opinions." The show features hour long conversations with a variety of scholars, writers, and scientists.

  • Gabrielle Hecht

    Gabrielle Hecht

    Stanton Foundation Professor of Nuclear Security and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioGabrielle Hecht is the Frank Stanton Foundation Professor of Nuclear Security at CISAC, Senior Fellow at FSI, Professor of History, and Professor (by courtesy) of Anthropology. She is Vice-President/President-Elect of the Society for the History of Technology.

    Her current research explores radioactive residues, mine waste, air pollution, and the Anthropocene in Africa. Essays based on this research have appeared in Cultural Anthropology, Aeon, Somatosphere, the LA Review of Books, and e-fluxArchitecture. Hecht's graduate courses include colloquia on "Infrastructure and Power in the Global South," "Technopolitics," and "Materiality and Power." She teaches a community-engaged undergraduate research seminar on "Racial Justice in the Nuclear Age," in partnership with the Bayview Hunters Point Community Advocates (BVHPCA). She is currently working with BVHPCA and other partners to develop knowledge infrastructures to underpin community-driven public history that supports racial equity and environmental justice.

    Hecht’s 2012 book Being Nuclear: Africans and the Global Uranium Trade offers new perspectives on the global nuclear order by focusing on African uranium mines and miners. It received awards from the Society for the Social Studies of Science, the American Historical Association, the American Sociological Association, and the Suzanne M. Glasscock Humanities Institute, as well as an honorable mention from the African Studies Association. An abridged version appeared in French as Uranium Africain, une histoire globale (Le Seuil 2016), and a Japanese translation is due out in 2021. Her first book, The Radiance of France: Nuclear Power and National Identity (1998/ 2nd ed 2009), explores how the French embedded nuclear policy in reactor technology, and nuclear culture in reactor operations. It received awards from the American Historical Association and the Society for the History of Technology, and has appeared in French as Le rayonnement de la France: Énergie nucléaire et identité nationale après la seconde guerre mondiale (2004/ 2014).

    Her affiliations at Stanford include the Center for African Studies, the Program in Science, Technology, and Society, the Center for Global Ethnography, the Program on Urban Studies, and the Program in Modern Thought and Literature. Before rejoining Stanford in 2017, Hecht taught at the University of Michigan’s History department for 18 years. She helped to found and direct UM’s Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS). She served as associate director of UM’s African Studies Center, and participated in its long-term collaboration with the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research (South Africa). She has supervised dissertations in STS, African history and anthropology, nuclear studies, and French history.

    Hecht holds a PhD in History and Sociology of Science from the University of Pennsylvania (1992), and a bachelor’s degree in Physics from MIT (1986). She’s been a visiting scholar in universities in Australia, France, the Netherlands, Norway, South Africa, and Sweden. Her work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council for Learned Societies, and the South African and Dutch national research foundations, among others. She serves on numerous advisory boards, including for the Andra, France’s national radioactive waste management agency.

  • Siegfried Hecker

    Siegfried Hecker

    Professor (Research) of Management Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsplutonium science; nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship; cooperative threat reduction

  • Thomas Heller

    Thomas Heller

    Lewis Talbot and Nadine Hearn Shelton Professor of International Legal Studies, Emeritus

    BioAn expert in international law and legal institutions, Thomas C. Heller has focused his research on the rule of law, international climate control, global energy use, and the interaction of government and nongovernmental organizations in establishing legal structures in the developing world. He has created innovative courses on the role of law in transitional and developing economies, as well as the comparative study of law in developed economies. He has co-directed the law school’s Rule of Law Program, as well as the Stanford Program in International and Comparative Law. Professor Heller has been a visiting professor at the European University Institute, Catholic University of Louvain, and Hong Kong University, and has served as the deputy director of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, where he is now a senior fellow.

    Professor Heller is also a senior fellow (by courtesy) at the Woods Institute for the Environment. Before joining the Stanford Law School faculty in 1979, he was a professor of law at the University of Wisconsin Law School and an attorney-advisor to the governments of Chile and Colombia.

  • Martin Hellman

    Martin Hellman

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioMartin E. Hellman is Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University and is affiliated with the university's Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC). His most recent work, "Rethinking National Security," identifies a number of questionable assumptions that are largely taken as axiomatic truths. A key part of that work brings a risk informed framework to a potential failure of nuclear deterrence and then finds surprising ways to reduce the risk. His earlier work included co-inventing public key cryptography, the technology that underlies the secure portion of the Internet. His many honors include election to the National Academy of Engineering and receiving (jointly with his colleague Whit Diffie) the million dollar ACM Turing Award, the top prize in computer science. In 2016, he and his wife of fifty years published "A New Map for Relationships: Creating True Love at Home & Peace on the Planet," providing a “unified field theory” for peace by illuminating the connections between nuclear war, conventional war, interpersonal war, and war within our own psyches.

  • David Hills

    David Hills

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Philosophy

    BioI did my undergraduate work at Amherst and went on to graduate school at Princeton. Since then I've taught at Harvard, UCLA, The University of Pennsylvania, The University of Michigan, Berkeley, and Stanford. I resumed my graduate career a little while back -- from a distance, as it were -- receiving the PhD in 2005.

    I'm married to another philosopher, Krista Lawlor.

    My interests continue to center in aesthetics, but they have spilled over into pretty much every branch of philosophy at one time or another.

    Wittgenstein, Culture and Value, 34: Im Rennen der Philosophie gewinnt, wer am langsamsten laufen kann. Oder: der, der das Ziel zuletzt erreicht. (In philosophy the race is to the one who can run slowest — the one who crosses the finish line last.) I'm not sure I believe this, but it's a comforting thing to read.

  • Pamela Hinds

    Pamela Hinds

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioPamela J. Hinds is Fortinet Founders Chair and Professor of Management Science & Engineering, Co-Director of the Center on Work, Technology, and Organization and on the Director's Council for the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design.. She studies the effect of technology on teams, collaboration, and innovation. Pamela has conducted extensive research on the dynamics of cross-boundary work teams, particularly those spanning national borders. She explores issues of culture, language, identity, conflict, and the role of site visits in promoting knowledge sharing and collaboration. She has published extensively on the relationship between national culture and work practices, particularly exploring how work practices or technologies created in one location are understood and employed at distant sites. Pamela also has a body of research on human-robot interaction in the work environment and the dynamics of human-robot teams. Most recently, Pamela has been looking at the changing nature of work in the face of emerging technologies, including the nature of coordination in open innovation, changes in work and organizing resulting from 3D-printing, and the work of data analysts. Her research has appeared in journals such as Organization Science, Research in Organizational Behavior, Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Annals, Academy of Management Discoveries, Human-Computer Interaction, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, and Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. Pamela is a Senior Editor of Organization Science. She is also co-editor with Sara Kiesler of the book Distributed Work (MIT Press). Pamela holds a Ph.D. in Organizational Science and Management from Carnegie Mellon University.

  • Daniel Ho

    Daniel Ho

    William Benjamin Scott and Luna M. Scott Professor of Law, Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioDaniel E. Ho is the William Benjamin Scott and Luna M. Scott Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, Professor of Political Science, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, Associate Director of the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, and Director of the Regulation, Evaluation, and Governance Lab (RegLab).

    He is also a Faculty Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Faculty Affiliate at the Woods Institute for the Environment, and Faculty Affiliate at the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities.

    His scholarship centers on quantitative empirical legal studies, with a substantive focus on administrative law and regulatory policy, antidiscrimination law, and courts. He received his J.D. from Yale Law School and his Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University, and clerked for Judge Stephen F. Williams on the U.S. Court of Appeals, District of Columbia Circuit. His research has appeared in journals such as the Stanford Law Review, the Yale Law Journal, the N.Y.U. Law Review, the Journal of the American Statistical Association, the American Statistician, the Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, Quarterly Journal of Political Science, Political Analysis, the Journal of Legal Studies, and the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the John Bingham Hurlbut Award for Excellence in Teaching at Stanford Law School (2010), the Warren Miller prize for the best paper published in Political Analysis (2008), and the Pi Sigma Alpha award for the best paper delivered at the Midwest Political Science Association meeting (2004). He served as President for the Society of Empirical Legal Studies (2011-12) and as co-editor of the Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization (2013-16).

  • Allyson Hobbs

    Allyson Hobbs

    Associate Professor of History

    BioAllyson Hobbs is an Assistant Professor in the History Department at Stanford University. She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University and she received a Ph.D. with distinction from the University of Chicago. She has received fellowships from the Ford Foundation, the Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research, and the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity at Stanford. Allyson teaches courses on American identity, African American history, African American women’s history, and twentieth century American history. She has won numerous teaching awards including the Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize, the Graves Award in the Humanities, and the St. Clair Drake Teaching Award. She gave a TEDx talk at Stanford, she has appeared on C-Span, MSNBC, National Public Radio, and her work has been featured on cnn.com, slate.com, and in the Los Angeles Times, The Chronicle of Higher Education, the Christian Science Monitor, and the New York Times.

    Allyson’s first book, A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life, published by Harvard University Press in October 2014, examines the phenomenon of racial passing in the United States from the late eighteenth century to the present. A Chosen Exile won two prizes from the Organization of American Historians: the Frederick Jackson Turner Prize for best first book in American history and the Lawrence Levine Prize for best book in American cultural history. A Chosen Exile has been featured on All Things Considered on National Public Radio, Book TV on C-SPAN, The Melissa Harris-Perry Show on MSNBC, the Tavis Smiley Show on Public Radio International, the Madison Show on SiriusXM, and TV News One with Roland Martin. A Chosen Exile has been reviewed in the New York Times Book Review, the San Francisco Chronicle, Harper’s, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and the Boston Globe. The book was selected as a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice, a “Best Book of 2014” by the San Francisco Chronicle, and a “Book of the Week” by the Times Higher Education in London. The Root named A Chosen Exile as one of the “Best 15 Nonfiction Books by Black Authors in 2014.”

  • Richie Hofmann

    Richie Hofmann

    Lecturer

    BioRichie Hofmann's new book of poems, A Hundred Lovers, will be published by Alfred A. Knopf in 2022. He is the author of Second Empire (Alice James Books, 2015), winner of the Beatrice Hawley Award, and a recipient of the Pushcart Prize and the Ruth Lilly Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation, among other honors. His poems appear recently in The New Yorker, Poetry, The Yale Review, and the New York Review of Books. A 2017-19 Wallace Stegner Fellow, he is currently Jones Lecturer in Poetry.

  • Susan Holmes

    Susan Holmes

    Professor of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab has been developing tools for the analyses of complex data structures, extending work on multivariate data to structured multitable table that include graphs, networks and trees as well as categorical and continuous measurements.
    We created and support the Bioconductor package phyloseq for the analyses of microbial ecology data from the microbiome. We have specialized in developing interactive graphical visualization tools for doing reproducible research in biology.

  • Hector Hoyos

    Hector Hoyos

    Associate Professor of Iberian and Latin American Cultures

    BioHéctor Hoyos is an Associate Professor of Latin American literature and culture at Stanford University. He holds a Ph.D. in Romance Studies from Cornell University, and degrees in Philosophy and Literature from Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá. Hoyos’s research areas include visual culture and critical theory, as well as comparative and philosophical approaches to literature. His teaching covers various periods and subregions, with an emphasis on contemporary fiction and literary theory. His book, Beyond Bolaño: The Global Latin American Novel (Columbia UP, 2015), is the first monographic, theoretical study of Latin American novelistic representations of globalization of its kind. He edited the special journal issues "Theories of the Contemporary in South America" for Revista de Estudios Hispánicos (with Marília Librandi-Rocha, 2014) and “La cultura material en las literaturas y cultura iberoamericanas de hoy” for Cuadernos de literatura (2016).

    His current manuscript, Things with a History: Transcultural Materialism in Latin America develops the concept of transculturation as a way of integrating new and historical strands of materialism in the study of narrative. The study focuses on post-1989 authors who rethink materiality, such as the Cuban José Antonio Ponte, the Chilean Alejandro Zambra, and the Bolivian Blanca Wiethüchter. Hoyos received an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation fellowship in connection with this project. Articles by Hoyos have appeared in Comparative Literature Studies, Third Text, Chasqui, Novel: A Forum on Fiction, and Revista Iberoamericana, among others.

  • Scott Hutchins

    Scott Hutchins

    Lecturer

    BioScott Hutchins is a former Truman Capote fellow in the Wallace Stegner Program at Stanford University. His work has appeared in StoryQuarterly, Catamaran, Five Chapters, The Owls, The Rumpus, The New York Times, San Francisco Magazine and Esquire, and has been set to improvisational jazz. He is the recipient of two major Hopwood awards and the Andrea Beauchamp prize in short fiction. In 2006 and 2010, he was an artist-in-residence at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris. His novel A Working Theory of Love was a San Francisco Chronicle and Salon Best Book of 2012 and has been translated into nine languages.