School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-20 of 60 Results

  • Jonathan Abel

    Jonathan Abel

    Adjunct Professor

    BioJonathan S. Abel is a Consulting Professor at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) in the Music Department at Stanford University, working in music and audio applications of signal and array processing, parameter estimation and acoustics. He is also a co-founder of Seismic Innovations, LLC, and Seismic Services, LLC, companies specializing in microseismic signal processing. Abel was a co-founder and Chief Technology Officer of the GRAMMY Award winning Universal Audio, Inc. He was previously a researcher at NASA/Ames Research Center, Chief Scientist of Crystal River Engineering, Inc., and a Lecturer in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Yale University. As an industry consultant, Abel has worked with Apple, Dolby, FDNY, LSI Logic, L3 Technologies, LR Baggs, Native Instruments, SAIC, Sennheiser, Sigma Cubed, Triple Ring, and the U.S. NRL on projects in professional audio, GPS, fire department siting and deployment, medical imaging, room acoustics measurement, audio effects processing, passive sonar, and microsiesmic signal processing. He holds Ph.D. and M.S. degrees from Stanford University, and an S.B. from MIT, all in electrical engineering. Abel is a Fellow of the Audio Engineering Society for contributions to audio effects processing.

  • Patricia Alessandrini

    Patricia Alessandrini

    Assistant Professor of Music

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsComputer-assisted analysis, composition
    Physical computing and robotics
    Multimedia interactive performance, aesthetics and paradigms of multimedia interaction
    Feminist perspectives on electronic music practices
    Use of technology in inclusive music, interfaces for the disabled
    Music Information Retrieval (MIR), concatenative synthesis, and physical modelling
    Motion capture, gestural control of electronics, and kinetics in electronics
    Music and sound design for film, video and installation art

  • Mark Applebaum

    Mark Applebaum

    Leland and Edith Smith Professor

    BioStudied with Brian Ferneyhough, Joji Yuasa, Rand Steiger; additional studies with Roger Reynolds, Phillip Rhodes, Mary Ellen Childs, Conlon Nancarrow.

    Selected commissions: Fromm Foundation, Merce Cunningham Dance Company, Vienna Modern Festival, Paul Dresher Ensemble, American Composers Forum, Betty Freeman, Zeitgeist, Meridian Arts Ensemble, MANUFACTURE (Tokyo), Belgium’s Champ D’Action, ADEvantgarde / Bayerische Theaterakademie (Munich), Electronic Music Midwest, Jerome Foundation, Harmida Trio.

    Recipient of the American Music Center’s Stephen Albert Award, Hincks Fellowship at Villa Montalvo Artist Colony, Jazz Society of Southern California Prize, 2005 2nd place emsPrize from Electronic Music Stockholm, Stanford’s 2003 Gores Award for Teaching Excellence.

    Performances include: Darmstadt New Music Courses, ICMC, Festival Spaziomusica, Young Nordic Music Festival, Sonic Circuits Hong Kong, SEAMUS, Southeastern Composers League, SIGGRAPH, the American Composers Orchestra’s OrchestraTech, Piano Spheres, Northwestern University New Music Marathon, the College Music Society, BONK Festival, Borges Festival in France, UNYAZI Festival South Aftrica, Time Canvas and TRANSIT Festivals in Belgium, the Essl Museum in Vienna, NIME at IRCAM in Paris, and the Kennedy Center.

    Papers include Experience Music Project’s Popular Music Studies conference, an article in New Music and Aesthetics in the 21st Century.

    Additional fields of interest include sound-sculpture design, jazz performance, collaborations with neural artists, animators, architects, florists, choreographers, laptop DJs. Recordings released on Innova, Tzadik, SEAMUS, & Capstone. Taught at Mississippi State University, Carleton College, and the University of California, San Diego.

  • Giancarlo Aquilanti

    Giancarlo Aquilanti

    Senior Lecturer in Music

    BioStudied composition with Paolo Ugoletti, Glenn Glasow, Wayne Peterson, and Jody Rockmaker.

    Numerous compositions, including songs for voice and various combinations of instruments, several orchestral, choral and band pieces, string quartets, and the operas La povertà, Lot’s Women, and Oxford Companions.

    Recipient of the Walter J. Gores award for excellence in teaching (2003-04), Stanford's highest award.

  • George Barth

    George Barth

    Billie Bennett Achilles Director of Keyboard Programs and Professor (Teaching) of Music

    BioSpecial fields: piano and fortepiano, 18th- through 20th-century performance practice, rhetoric and music, the piano music of Beethoven, Chopin, Mozart, Brahms, Ives, and Bartók. Studied with Jon Barlow, Malcolm Bilson, and John Kirkpatrick.

    Appearances as recitalist, as soloist with orchestra, and as musicologist throughout the U.S. and Central Europe.

    NEH Fellow, 1989.

    Publications: Understanding Beethoven: The Mind of the Master (CD-ROM for Oxford/Stanford/Yale Alliance for Lifelong Learning, 2002); The Pianist as Orator: Beethoven and the Transformation of Keyboard Style, 1992; articles and reviews in Early Music, Early Keyboard Studies Newsletter, Humanities, Hungarian Quarterly, Music & Letters, Music Library Association Notes, New Grove Dictionary II.

    Recitals: Old First Concerts with Miriam Abramowitsch, mezzo soprano (San Francisco, 2002); Gallery Concerts with Tamara Friedman, fortepiano (Seattle, 2001); Mozart Concertos with the St. Lawrence String Quartet (Cantor Arts Center, Stanford, 2000); Trinity Concerts (Berkeley, 1999); Concerts on the Fringe (Berkeley Festival, 1996); San Francisco Early Music Society (1996). Presenter: Humanities West Symposium Beethoven: Resonant Genius (2003); First International Carl Czerny Symposium (Edmonton, 2002); Juilliard School’s International Symposium on Performing Mozart’s Music (1991); Westfield Center’s Bicentenary Humanities Symposium on Mozarts Nature, Mozarts World (1991); Ira Brilliant Center for Beethoven Studies, SJSU (1991).

    Recordings: Beethoven Cello Sonatas with Stephen Harrison, cello (Alliance for Lifelong Learning, 2002), Music & Arts, Boston Public Radio.

    Lecturer for Stanford Continuing Studies, 2001 (Beethoven’s Cello Sonatas); 1998 (Beethoven Quartet Cycle); Stanford Series in the Arts, 1993 (Bartók).

  • Jonathan Berger

    Jonathan Berger

    Denning Family Provostial Professor
    On Leave from 10/01/2023 To 06/30/2024

    BioJonathan Berger is the Denning Family Provostial Professor in Music at Stanford University, where he teaches composition, music theory, and cognition at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA).
    Jonathan is a 2017 Guggenheim Fellow and a 2016 winner of the Rome Prize.
    He was the founding co-director of the Stanford Institute for Creativity and the Arts (SICA, now the Stanford Arts Institute) and founding director of Yale University’s Center for Studies in Music Technology
    Described as “gripping” by both the New York Times and the Chicago Tribune, “poignant”, “richly evocative” (San Francisco Chronicle), “taut, and hauntingly beautiful” (NY Times), Jonathan Berger’s recent works deal with both consciousness and conscience. His monodrama, My Lai, toured internationally. The Kronos Quartet's recording was released by Smithsonian/Folkways. His opera, The Ritual of Breath is the Rite to Resist will be performed at Lincoln Center in July 2024.
    Thrice commissioned by The National Endowment for the Arts, Berger’a recent commissions include The Mellon and Rockefeller Foundations, Chamber Music Society, Lincoln Center, and Chamber Music America.
    Upcoming commissions include a new work for the Kronos Quartet.
    In addition to composition, Berger is an active researcher with over 80 publications in a wide range of fields relating to music, science and technology and has held research grants from DARPA, the Wallenberg Foundation, The National Academy of Sciences, the Keck Foundation, and others.
    Berger is the PI of a major grant from the Templeton Religion Trust to study how music and architecture interact to create a sense of awe.

  • Karol Berger

    Karol Berger

    Osgood Hooker Professor in Fine Arts, Emeritus

    BioKarol Berger (Ph.D. Yale 1975) is the Osgood Hooker Professor in Fine Arts, Emeritus at the Department of Music, as well as an affiliated faculty at the Department of German Studies, and an affiliated researcher at the Europe Center. A native of Poland, he has lived in the U.S. since 1968 and taught at Stanford since 1982. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, American Council of Learned Societies, the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Study and Conference Center, and Stanford Humanities Center. In 2011-12 he has been the EURIAS Senior Fellow at the Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen in Vienna. In 2005-2006, he was the Robert Lehman Visiting Professor at Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies. He is a foreign member of the Polish Academy of Sciences, an honorary member of the American Musicological Society, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a foreign member of the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences (Cracow), and a foreign member of the Academia Europaea. His Musica Ficta received the 1988 Otto Kinkeldey Award of the American Musicological Society, his Bach's Cycle, Mozart's Arrow the 2008 Marjorie Weston Emerson Award of the Mozart Society of America, and his Beyond Reason the 2018 Otto Kinkeldey Award of the American Musicological Society. In 2011 he received the Glarean Prize from the Swiss Musicological Society and in 2014 the Humboldt Research Award of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

  • Terry Berlier

    Terry Berlier

    Professor of Art and Art History and, by courtesy, of Music

    Bio“Terry Berlier makes conceptual art of unusual intelligence, humor and sensitivity to the impact of materials.”—Kenneth Baker, San Francisco Chronicle

    I am an Associate Professor of Art and an interdisciplinary artist teaching classes primarily in sculpture. I acknowledge that Stanford University occupies the unceded lands of the Muwekma Ohlone Nation, and honor the ancestral and ongoing relationships between the Muwekma Ohlone and these territories. I acknowledge that I am a settler on these lands with an obligation to humility; gratitude; and contributions to Indigenous rematriation and sovereignty, wellness and well-being, and the collective struggle against colonization and oppression.

    Terry Berlier is an interdisciplinary artist who investigates the evolution of human interaction with queerness and ecologies. She has exhibited in solo and group shows in North America, Europe, Asia, South America, and Australia. This results in sculptures that are kinetic and sound based, and multi-media installations. She emphasizes the essential roles played by history, cultural memories, and environmental conditions in the creation of our identities. Using humor, she provides tools for recovering and reanimating our faltering connections with self, queerness, nature, and society. Interweaving movement, sound, and interaction as a metaphor for both harmonious and dissonant interactions, Berlier acts as an archaeologist excavating material objects to challenge our understanding of progress and reveal how history is constructed within a cultural landscape.

    Recent exhibitions include the Yerba Buena Center for Arts, Contemporary Jewish Museum of San Francisco, Catherine Clark Gallery, Southern Exposure, Contemporary Art and Spirits in Osaka Japan, Arnoff Center for the Arts in Cincinnati, San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art, Thomas Welton Stanford Art Gallery at Stanford University, Montalvo Arts Center, Weston Art Gallery, Babel Gallery in Norway, Richard L. Nelson Gallery, Center for Contemporary Art in Sacramento, Kala Art Institute Gallery, San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery, Natural Balance in Girona Spain and FemArt Mostra D’Art De Dones in Barcelona Spain. She has received numerous residencies and grants including the Center for Cultural Innovation Grant, the Zellerbach Foundation Berkeley, Artist in Residence at Montalvo Arts Center, Arts Council Silicon Valley Artist Fellowship, Michelle R. Clayman Institute for Gender Research Fellow at Stanford University, Recology San Francisco, Hungarian Multicultural Center in Budapest Hungary, Exploratorium: Museum of Science, Art and Human Perception in San Francisco, California Council for Humanities California Stories Fund and the Millay Colony for Artists. Her work has been reviewed in the BBC News Magazine, San Francisco Chronicle and in the book ‘Seeing Gertrude Stein’ published by University of California Press. Her work is in several collections including the Progressive Corporation in Cleveland Ohio, Kala Art Institute in Berkeley California and Bildwechsel Archive in Berlin Germany.

    She received a Masters in Fine Arts in Studio Art from University of California, Davis and a Bachelors of Fine Arts from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Terry Berlier is an Associate Professor and Director of the Sculpture Lab and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Art and Art History at Stanford University where she has taught since 2007.

  • Marina Bosi-Goldberg

    Marina Bosi-Goldberg

    Adjunct Professor

    BioMarina Bosi started her career as musician, performing and teaching at the Venice National Conservatory of Music, Italy, and spending about two years as a chargée de recherche at IRCAM, Paris, where she completed her thesis in Physics. She is currently Consulting Professor in the Music Department at Stanford University and is also a founding member and director of the Digital Media Project, a non-profit organization that promotes successful development, deployment, and use of Digital Media. Previously, Dr. Bosi was Chief Technology Officer of MPEG LA®, a firm specializing in the licensing of multimedia technology; VP-Technology, Standards and Strategies at Digital Theater Systems (DTS); was part of the research team at Dolby Laboratories that developed AC-3 (aka Dolby Digital) and where she also led the MPEG-2 AAC (the core coding technology used in Apple's iTunes, etc.) development for which she received the ISO/IEC 1997 Project Editor award; DSP Engineer at Digidesign where she designed and implemented real-time DSP modules for Sound Designer II (the precursor of Pro Tools). Dr. Bosi has been actively involved in the development of standards for audio and video coding and for managing digital content, contributing to the work of ANSI, ATSC, DVD Forum, DVB, ISO/IEC MPEG, SDMI, and SMPTE. A past President of the Audio Engineering Society (AES), Dr. Bosi is a Fellow of the AES served the AES in various capacities including as a member of the Board of Governors, as VP of the Western Region USA and Canada, and as Chair of the San Francisco Section. Dr. Bosi is a member the Technical Committee on Audio and Electroacoustics of the IEEE Signal Processing Society, a senior member of IEEE, and a member of ASA.

    Dr. Bosi received the AES Silver Medal Award in recognition of outstanding achievements in the development and the standardization of audio coding, video coding, and secure digital rights management. She received the AES Board of Governors Award twice: for her co-chairmanship of the 96th AES Convention and again for her co-chairmanship of the 17th AES International Conference, the first scientific international conference dedicated to the topic of high quality audio coding. She also has received several awards for her scholarship from both the French and Italian governments.

    A graduate of Stanford Business School’s “Stanford Executive Program”, Marina holds several patents and publications and is author of the acclaimed textbook “Introduction to Digital Audio Coding and Standards” (Kluwer/Springer December 2002). Marina is currently Treasurer-Elect and Board member of the AES and is a member of the Scientific Council of ISSNAF.

  • Chris Chafe

    Chris Chafe

    Duca Family Professor

    BioChris Chafe is a composer, improvisor, and cellist, developing much of his music alongside computer-based research. He is Director of Stanford University's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). In 2019, he was International Visiting Research Scholar at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies The University of British Columbia, Visiting Professor at the Politecnico di Torino, and Edgard-Varèse Guest Professor at the Technical University of Berlin. At IRCAM (Paris) and The Banff Centre (Alberta), he has pursued methods for digital synthesis, music performance and real-time internet collaboration. CCRMA's jacktrip project involves live concertizing with musicians the world over. Online collaboration software and research into latency factors continue to evolve. An active performer either on the net or physically present, his music reaches audiences in sometimes novel venues. An early network project was a simultaneous five-country concert was hosted at the United Nations in 2009. Chafe’s works include gallery and museum music installations which are now into their second decade with “musifications” resulting from collaborations with artists, scientists and MD’s. Recent work includes the Earth Symphony, the Brain Stethoscope project (Gnosisong), PolarTide for the 2013 Venice Biennale, Tomato Quintet for the transLife:media Festival at the National Art Museum of China and Sun Shot played by the horns of large ships in the port of St. Johns, Newfoundland.

  • Christopher Costanza

    Christopher Costanza

    Artist in Residence, Music

    BioFor over three decades cellist Christopher Costanza has enjoyed a varied and exciting career as a soloist, chamber musician, and teacher. A winner of the Young Concert Artists International Auditions and a recipient of a prestigious Solo Recitalists Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, Mr. Costanza has performed to wide critical acclaim in nearly every state in the U.S., and in Canada, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Australia, New Zealand, China, Korea, Germany, France, the U.K., Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Romania, and Hungary. His summer festival appearances include the Marlboro, Yellow Barn, Santa Fe, Taos, Chamber Music Northwest, Seattle, Bay Chamber Concerts, Ottawa, and Bravo! Vail Valley festivals. Mr. Costanza is a graduate of the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, where he studied cello with Laurence Lesser, David Wells, and Bernard Greenhouse, and chamber music with Eugene Lehner, Louis Krasner, and Leonard Shure.

    Mr. Costanza joined the St. Lawrence String Quartet (SLSQ) in 2003, and tours and records extensively with that ensemble, performing over 100 concerts annually throughout the world. As a member of the SLSQ, he is an Artist in Residence at Stanford University, where he teaches cello and chamber music and performs a wide variety of formal and informal concerts each season, from the stages of the University’s concert halls to student dormitories and lecture halls. A strong proponent of contemporary music, Mr. Costanza works regularly with the world’s most notable composers, such as John Adams, Jonathan Berger, Osvaldo Golijov, Mark Applebaum, Pierre Boulez, George Tsontakis, Roberto Sierra, R. Murray Schafer, William Bolcom, John Corigliano, and Bright Sheng. As a student, he had the honor of studying Olivier Messiaen’s “Quartet for the End of Time” under the guidance of the composer.

    Mr. Costanza’s discography includes numerous chamber music and solo recordings on the Nonesuch, EMI/Angel, Naxos, Innova, Albany, Summit, and ArtistShare labels. In 2006, he received a Grammy nomination for his recording of major chamber works for winds and strings by Mozart. Additionally, several St. Lawrence String Quartet recordings on EMI have also been nominated for Juno awards. Mr. Costanza's recordings of the iconic Six Suites for Solo Cello by J.S. Bach, along with his commentary on each suite, can be found on his website, costanzacello.com. In August, 2019, the SLSQ released its latest recording, of all six Op. 20 String Quartets of Haydn, in three formats: CD’s, on-line through streaming platforms, and limited-edition vinyl LP’s.

    Mr. Costanza is frequently heard on radio broadcasts worldwide, including the CBC in Canada, NPR in the United States, and on various European broadcasting networks. He is privileged to perform on an early 18th century Venetian cello, part of the Harry R. Lange Collection of Instruments and Bows at Stanford.

    In addition to his varied musical interests, Mr. Costanza is an avid long-distance runner and hiker. A self-described train enthusiast, he enjoys riding and exploring the passenger railways of the world. He is fascinated by architecture and seeks out innovative architectural offerings of each city he visits on tour. At home in California, he is passionate about cooking, focusing his attention on new and creative dishes which take advantage of the abundance of remarkable organic local produce. Mr. Costanza's wife, Debra Fong, is a wonderful violinist, and their daughter, Isabella, is a terrific violist currently studying at the Glenn Gould School in Toronto.