School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-42 of 42 Results

  • Rajpreet Chahal

    Rajpreet Chahal

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioRaj received her Ph.D. in Human Development and Designated Emphasis in Translational Research from the University of California, Davis in 2019, where she was a TL1 Pre-Doctoral Clinical Research Training Scholar and supported by the UC Davis School of Medicine and the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. In her graduate work, Raj assessed how inter-individual differences in key developmental aspects of adolescence (i.e., puberty, psychopathology, and the brain) inform one another to contribute to our understanding of heterogeneous risk mechanisms and opportunities for targeted interventions. Specifically, Raj characterized associations between pubertal timing, structural and functional network properties in the brain, and internalizing symptoms. Raj also examined topographical signatures in white matter tracts as they reflect the history of depressive symptoms in adolescent girls, and patterns of functional connectivity, revealed by neural biotyping, as they forecast future internalizing symptoms in at-risk adolescents. As a post-doctoral researcher in the SNAP lab, Raj is extending her work by studying the effects of early life stress on the development of large-scale structural and functional brain circuits to understand when and in whom neurobiological alterations arise and confer risk for depression and suicidal ideation. The goal of this research is to guide person-centered approaches to detect vulnerability for, and predict the course of depression.

  • Li (Leigh) Chu

    Li (Leigh) Chu

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioLi (Leigh) Chu is a postdoctoral researcher working with Dr. Laura Carstensen at Stanford University. She is most intrigued by topics relating to aging, curiosity, learning motivation and technological acceptance. She completed her Ph.D. in Psychology with Dr. Helene Fung at Chinese University of Hong Kong and her B.A. at University of British Columbia. In the past, she also worked with Dr. Christiane Hoppmann (UBC), Dr. Su-ling Yeh (NTU) and Dr. Nancy Pachana (UQ).

  • Xiao Ge

    Xiao Ge

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research sits at the intersection of Emotion, Learning, Culture and Technology

    Future: I want to conduct culturally-appropriate (intervention) studies to guide people to raise socio-emotional awareness and effectively navigate emotional disturbances in learning and work practice that is increasingly multicultural and multidisciplinary in nature.

    Past: my dissertation investigates the constructive role of perplexity and emotional disturbance in collaborative design

  • Eline R Kupers

    Eline R Kupers

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioEline Kupers is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow working with Professor Kalanit Grill-Spector in the Psychology Department. Her research focuses on how visual information is processed in space and time in the human brain. She uses psychophysics, eye tracking, and neuroimaging techniques (MRI, EEG/MEG) in combination with computational modeling to answer her research questions.

    Eline received her PhD from New York University, working with Professor Jonathan Winawer and Professor Marisa Carrasco. During her graduate studies, she worked on models of the human visual system that describe the first steps in seeing (from the retina to primary visual cortex). In her postdoctoral work, she continues to work on computational models of vision, but focuses on the neural mechanisms involved in high-level vision.

  • Georgia Loukatou

    Georgia Loukatou

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioI am a computational psycholinguist and postdoctoral researcher at the Language and Cognition Lab, Stanford University with Dr. Michael C. Frank. I am working on reverse engineering word learning in diverse languages, focusing on its learning factors and mechanisms. I am interested in new technologies and methods to study language processing and the use of language across contexts.
    I completed my PhD in Cognitive Science at the Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique, Ecole Normale Supérieure under the supervision of Dr. Alex Cristia. My doctoral research addresses issues of cross-linguistic and cross-cultural diversity and learnability in language acquisition.
    My research is at the crossroads of cognitive science, drawing mostly from linguistics and computer science, but also from anthropology and psychology. I follow an interdisciplinary approach, implementing computational modeling, corpus analyses and experimental methods. I am an advocate of open science and science communication.

  • Kevin Paul Madore

    Kevin Paul Madore

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioBackground and Research:

    I'm a Postdoctoral Fellow in Psychology at Stanford with Anthony Wagner and funded by an extramural NRSA F32 from NIA. My K99/R00 from NINDS has also recently been funded. I received a PhD in Psychology at Harvard with Dan Schacter in 2017 where I was extramurally funded by the Beinecke Scholarship and Sackler Psychobiology Program, and a BA in Psychology and History from Middlebury College in 2011.

    My research program focuses on memory preparedness, or what can be conceptualized as 'readiness to remember'. Preparatory processes at play before we engage in remembering may affect whether and how we remember. I take a three-pronged approach to this topic, examining effects within the individual, between individuals, and between groups. With basic science and translational science aims, my research addresses the following questions using a combination of behavioral (task and survey), eyetracking (pupillometry and gaze), and neural (EEG, fMRI, concurrent EEG-fMRI, TMS) methods:

    1) How do preparatory processes in the moment and minutes before remembering impact memory?
    2) How do these preparatory processes impact functions of memory, such as prospection and creativity?
    3) How do individual differences in preparatory processes relate to memory ability?
    4) How do preparatory processes contribute to age-related memory change?
    5) How does engagement with the modern media landscape relate to preparatory processes and memory?

    Updates and News:

    Fall 2021: My K99/R00 grant from NINDS on neurocomputational mechanisms of attention, goals, and memory has been funded. My training goals are to learn and execute computational modeling and bioengineered closed-loop task designs.

    Fall 2020: My postdoc work on attention, goals, memory, and media multitasking is now published at Nature.

  • Pardis Miri

    Pardis Miri

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioPardis Miri, PhD, recently received her doctorate in computer science, in the area of human computer interaction, from University of California Santa Cruz. As a PhD student, she spent the last 3 years of her training at Stanford University under the supervision of Dr. Marzullo, Dr. Gross, and Dr. Isbister. For her dissertation, she took a multidisciplinary approach in using technology for affect regulation. More specifically, she explored the placement and pattern, and personalization of a vibrotactile breathing pacer system that she developed during her graduate studies. Her work was funded by the National Science Foundation and Intel labs. Prior to being a Ph.D. student, Miri earned her Master’s degree in computer science from the University of California San Diego in the area of Systems and Networking. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University conducting research in using vibrotactile technology to aid affect regulation in neurotypical and neurodiverse populations.

  • Martin Noergaard

    Martin Noergaard

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioMartin Noergaard did his PhD with the title "optimizing preprocessing pipelines in PET/MR neuroimaging" at the University of Copenhagen, in collaboration with University of Toronto, and the Martinos Center (MGH/Harvard-MIT). Martin has a strong expertise in medical image analysis, and is heavily involved in data sharing initiatives, standardization/evaluation of workflows for PET brain imaging, and developing the BIDS standard for PET imaging.

  • Rui Pei

    Rui Pei

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioRui (/ˈreɪ/) received her B.Sc. in Cognitive Neuroscience from Brown University, and her Ph.D. in Communication from the University of Pennsylvania. She is interested in understanding how adolescents and young adults make social decisions in the context of psychological and neural development. Her research focuses on social risk taking, or risk taking behaviors that bring social consequences. Some of the questions that her research tries to answer include: what motivates people to take social risks, and how does social risk taking contribute to adolescent health and well-being?

  • Marianne Reddan

    Marianne Reddan

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioMarianne began researching human emotion as an undergraduate in the laboratory of Elizabeth Phelps at NYU under the guidance of Catherine Hartley. Later she worked as a lab manager for Daniela Schiller at Mount Sinai. She completed her PhD with Tor Wager at CU Boulder in 2019 where she specialized in machine learning applications to neuroimaging analysis and then began her post doc with Jamil Zaki at Stanford shortly after. She is interested in decoding how the brain represents emotions and how these representations are modified through social interaction. She hopes that her research can benefit society by promoting mutual aid and transformative justice.

  • Pilleriin Sikka

    Pilleriin Sikka

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPilleriin's main research interests focus on emotions and emotion regulation, mental well-being, sleep and dreaming, and consciousness. More specifically, she conducts research on the nature and continuity of emotions and emotion regulation across the wake-sleep cycle and how these are related to health and well-being. She also strives to understand the psychology and neurobiology of peace of mind as an aspect of mental well-being. In her research Pilleriin uses a multidisciplinary and multilevel framework that draws on the concepts, theories, and methods from the fields of philosophy, psychology, (affective) neuroscience, and (molecular) biology, and integrates different research areas, such as emotion research, sleep and dream research, consciousness research, and well-being research.

  • Armin Thomas

    Armin Thomas

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioI am a Ram and Vijay Shriram Data Science Fellow at Stanford Data Science, where I work with Russ Poldrack. My research is located at the intersection of machine learning, neuroscience, and psychology. I am interested in using machine learning techniques to better understand neuroimaging data and human cognitive processes. In my past work, I have explored the cognitive processes underlying simple economic choices and developed computational frameworks that utilize deep learning methods to analyze whole-brain functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data.

    Prior to coming to Stanford, I obtained a PhD in machine learning from Technische Universität Berlin, as well as a MSc in cognitive neuroscience and a BSc in psychology from Freie Universität Berlin. I was also active as a mentor for the Max Planck School of Cognition, and as a researcher for the California Institute of Technology and Max Planck Institute for Human Development.

  • Alexandra Nicole Trelle

    Alexandra Nicole Trelle

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioI completed my undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto, and my PhD at the University of Cambridge. My work explores the neural mechanisms supporting episodic memory, and how these are affected by aging and Alzheimer's disease. I am currently leading the Stanford Aging and Memory Study, a large-scale longitudinal project examining individual differences in episodic memory in older adults. My research combines structural and functional MRI, PET imaging, and analysis of molecular and genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

  • Robin Wollast

    Robin Wollast

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioDr. Wollast is a postdoctoral researcher in psychology at the Stanford Psychophysiology Laboratory. He earned his PhD from Université libre de Bruxelles in Belgium. He has published numerous first-authored scientific articles in leading international journals and collaborated with highly regarded experts from America, Europe, and Asia. Dr. Wollast won the prestigious Belgian American Educational Foundation Award to conduct research on emotion and emotion regulation at Stanford University. His primary research focuses on body image, self-compassion, and mindfulness through various lenses, including culture, gender, and mental health. Besides this main focus, Dr. Wollast studies dropout and perseverance in doctoral studies, and he is involved in several studies on collective action, group polarization, and ideological extremism. Currently, he is leading many projects related to the COVID-19 pandemic, including large-scale studies conducted in more than 100 countries and translated into 30 languages.

  • Chunchen Xu

    Chunchen Xu

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioI am currently a researcher at the Psychology Department at Stanford University. I’m broadly interested in the social psychological impact of smart technology. In particular, I explore cultural assumptions underlying conceptions of smart technology in different groups and societies—how do pre-existing cultural worldviews and values afford people to imagine, design, and interact with smart technology in different ways? Whose cultures are represented and promoted by the deployment of smart technology? I believe unpacking these cultural assumptions is critical to reflecting on the purposes of smart technology so as to guide its development to serve a broader range of the population in society.

    I received my Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior from Stanford Graduate School of Business, where I was lucky to be advised by Prof. Brian Lowery. After that, I have been working with Prof. Hazel Markus on research related to culture, creativity, and smart technology. My work has been supported by the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI), Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS), and Hasso Plattner Design Thinking Research Program (HPDTRP).

    Prior to Stanford, I completed a Bachelor’s degree in China. I also obtained Master’s degrees in Anthropology and in Human Resources and Industrial Relations respectively.

  • Xuan Zhao

    Xuan Zhao

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychology

    BioPlease refer to my personal website: https://www.xuan-zhao.com

    My personal website is the only place I regularly update regarding my research interests, activities, and publications.