School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 3,441-3,460 of 3,676 Results

  • Lyris Wiedemann

    Lyris Wiedemann

    Senior Lecturer in the Language Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests include sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, acquisition of cognate languages, development of cultural competence, and translation. I am one of the creators of the international symposium on Portuguese for Spanish Speakers: Acquisition and Teaching, which had its fifth edition in 2014, and an author and editor of several scholarly articles and books. My current focus is on the acquisition of Portuguese by speakers of Spanish and other Romance languages.

  • Carl Wieman

    Carl Wieman

    DRC Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Physics and of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Wieman group’s research generally focuses on the nature of expertise in science and engineering, particularly physics, and how that expertise is best learned, measured, and taught. This involves a range of approaches, including individual cognitive interviews, laboratory experiments, and classroom interventions with controls for comparisons. We are also looking at how different classroom practices impact the attitudes and learning of different demographic groups.

  • Karen Wigen

    Karen Wigen

    Frances and Charles Field Professor in History

    BioKären Wigen teaches Japanese history and the history of cartography at Stanford. A geographer by training, she earned her doctorate at the University of California at Berkeley. Her first book, The Making of a Japanese Periphery, 1750-1920 (1995), mapped the economic transformation of southern Nagano Prefecture during the heyday of the silk industry. Her second book, A Malleable Map: Geographies of Restoration in Central Japan, 1600-1912 (2010), returned to the ground of that study, exploring the roles of cartography, chorography, and regionalism in the making of modern Shinano.

    An abiding interest in world history led her to co-author The Myth of Continents (1997) with Martin Lewis, and to co-direct the "Oceans Connect" project at Duke University. She also introduced a forum on oceans in history for the American Historical Review and co-edited Seascapes: Maritime Histories, Littoral Cultures, and Transoceanic Exchanges (2007) with Jerry Bentley and Renate Bridenthal. Her latest project is another collaboration, Cartographic Japan: A History in Maps, with co-editors Sugimoto Fumiko and Cary Karacas ( University of Chicago Press, forthcoming 2016).

  • Gail Wight

    Gail Wight

    Associate Professor of Art and Art History

    BioGail Wight holds an MFA in New Genres from the San Francisco Art Institute where she was a Javits Fellow, and a BFA from the Studio for Interrelated Media at Massachusetts College of Art. She has an extensive international exhibition record, with over a dozen solo exhibits throughout North America and Great Britain, and her work has been collected by numerous institutions including the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Among her many artist residencies are western Australia’s Symbiotica, Art & Archaeology at Stonehenge, the Rockefeller Foundation in Bellagio, and San Francisco’s Exploratorium. Her work is represented by Patricia Sweetow Gallery in San Francisco.

  • Michael Wilcox

    Michael Wilcox

    Senior Lecturer, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity

    BioMichael Wilcox joined the Department of Cultural and Social Anthropology at Stanford University in 2001 as an Assistant Professor. His dissertation, entitled "The Pueblo Revolt of 1680: Communities of Resistance, Ethnic Conflict and Alliance Formation Among Upper Rio Grande Pueblos," articulates the social consequences of subordination, and explores the processes of boundary maintenance at both regional and communal levels. During his graduate studies at Harvard, he was very involved in strengthening the Harvard University Native American Program and in designing and teaching award-winning courses in Native American Studies.

    His recent publications include: The Pueblo Revolt and the Mythology of Conquest: An Indigenous Archaeology of Contact, University of California Press (2009) (book blog at: http://www.ucpress.edu/blog/?p=5000); Marketing Conquest and the Vanishing Indian: An Indigenous Response to Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel and Collapse; Journal of Social Archaeology, Vol. 10, No. 1, 92-117 (2010); Saving Indigenous Peoples From Ourselves: Separate but Equal Archaeology is Not Scientific Archaeology", American Antiquity 75(2), 2010; NAGPRA and Indigenous Peoples: The Social Context, Controversies and the Transformation of American Archaeology, in Voices in American Archaeology: 75th Anniversary Volume of the Society for American Archaeology, edited by Wendy Ashmore, Dorothy Lippert, and Barbara J. Mills (2010).

    Professor Wilcox's main research interests include Native American ethnohistory in the American Southwest; the history of Pueblo Peoples in New Mexico; Indigenous Archaeology; ethnic identity and conflict; DNA, race and cultural identity in archaeology and popular culture; and the political and historical relationships between Native Americans, anthropologists and archaeologists.

  • Laura DeNardo

    Laura DeNardo

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Biology

    BioI obtained my PhD in Neuroscience from the University of California, San Diego in 2013. In my doctoral research, I identified a molecular mechanism that governs the formation of specific classes of hippocampal synapses. Through this work, I gained experience in slice electrophysiology, molecular biology, and in vivo molecular manipulations.

    I joined the Luo lab at Stanford as a postdoc in 2013. I first examined region- and layer-specific patterns of cortical synaptic connectivity using viral-genetic tools developed in the Luo lab. I am currently using state-of-the art genetic tools, including a knockin mouse that I developed to access activated neurons (TRAP2), to investigate the role of prefrontal cortex in remote fear memory retrieval. Through this work, I am uncovering the circuit mechanisms that underlie behaviors which become maladaptive in psychiatric disorders.

  • Dan Wilkins

    Dan Wilkins

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Physics

    BioI am an Einstein Fellow in the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford. My research focuses on how supermassive black holes in the centres of galaxy power AGN, some of the most luminous objects we see in the Universe. Specifically, I am interested in how we can bridge the divide between observational and theoretical studies of accreting black holes and prepare for the next generation X-ray observatories to build up a three-dimensional picture of the infalling material just moments before it passes the event horizon, the limit beyond which nothing can escape.

    I am passionate about communicating science to the general public. I regularly give public lectures to a wide variety of audiences and appear on TV and radio. I am actively involved in a number of initiatives to involve the public in astronomy and physics.

  • Robb Willer

    Robb Willer

    Professor of Sociology and, by courtesy, of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business

    BioRobb Willer is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Sociology, Psychology (by courtesy), and the Graduate School of Business (by courtesy) at Stanford University. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. in Sociology from Cornell University and his B.A. in Sociology from the University of Iowa. He previously taught at the University of California, Berkeley.

    Professor Willer’s teaching and research focus on the bases of social order. One line of his research investigates the factors driving the emergence of collective action, norms, solidarity, generosity, and status hierarchies. In other research, he explores the social psychology of political attitudes, including the effects of fear, prejudice, and masculinity in contemporary U.S. politics. Most recently, his work has focused on morality, studying how people reason about what is right and wrong and the social consequences of their judgments. His research involves various empirical and theoretical methods, including laboratory and field experiments, surveys, direct observation, archival research, physiological measurement, agent-based modeling, and social network analysis.

    Willer’s research has appeared in such journals as American Sociology Review, American Journal of Sociology, Annual Review of Sociology, Administrative Science Quarterly, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Psychological Science, Proceedings of the Royal Society B:Biological Sciences,and Social Networks.He has received grants from the National Science Foundation, the California Environmental Protection Agency, and the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. His work has received paper awards from the American Sociological Association’s sections on Altruism, Morality, and Social Solidarity, Mathematical Sociology, Peace, War, and Social Conflict, and Rationality and Society.

    His research has also received widespread media coverage including from the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, the Washington Post, Science, Nature, Time, U.S. News and World Report, Scientific American, Harper’s, Slate, CNN, NBC Nightly News, The Today Show, and National Public Radio.

    Willer was the 2009 recipient of the Golden Apple Teaching award, the only teaching award given by UC-Berkeley's student body.