School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 3,451-3,500 of 3,627 Results

  • Frank Wolak

    Frank Wolak

    Holbrook Working Professor in Commodity Price Studies, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute, at the Precourt Institute and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioFrank A. Wolak is a Professor in the Department of Economics at Stanford University. His fields of specialization are Industrial Organization and Econometric Theory. His recent work studies methods for introducing competition into infrastructure industries -- telecommunications, electricity, water delivery and postal delivery services -- and on assessing the impacts of these competition policies on consumer and producer welfare. He is the Chairman of the Market Surveillance Committee of the California Independent System Operator for electricity supply industry in California. He is a visiting scholar at University of California Energy Institute and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).

    Professor Wolak received his Ph.D. and M.S. from Harvard University and his B.A. from Rice University.

  • Mikael Wolfe

    Mikael Wolfe

    Assistant Professor of History

    BioI am an environmental historian of modern Mexico and Latin America focusing on the history of water control, agrarian reform, hydraulic technology, drought and climate change. In several published articles and in my book manuscript “Watering the Revolution: The Technopolitical Success and Socioecological Failure of Agrarian Reform in La Laguna, Mexico,” I examine the role of technical actors or “técnicos’ – in particular hydraulic engineers and agronomists – as mediators between the Mexican state, society and nature from the late 19th to 20th centuries. Based on extensive archival research on the emblematic cotton rich north-central arid Laguna region, I argue that técnicos confronted an irresolvable contradiction between their realization of the urgent need for conservation of scarce water resources and the insatiable popular demand for them as they implemented Latin America’s most ambitious agrarian reform decreed by populist president Lázaro Cárdenas in the region in 1936. Rather than the mostly passive implementers of grand socio-environmental state engineering schemes depicted in much interdisciplinary literature, I show that they were active participants able to exert considerable influence on both local water users and national politicians as they “modernized” the region’s conflict-ridden but ecologically benign flood irrigation system from the 1930s to the 1970s. More broadly, I demonstrate how the paradox of technopolitical success (the impressive construction of large dams, canals and groundwater pumping installations) and the socioecological failure (rapid depletion and contamination of both surface and subsurface waters) of agrarian reform in the paradigmatic Laguna was inscribed in the revolutionary 1917 Constitution, which mandated both agricultural development and the conservation of natural resources nationwide without specifying how, thereby making técnicos work at cross-purposes with major conflicts-of-interest. Unfortunately, despite more advanced knowledge of natural processes that was subsequently incorporated in new legislation more strictly regulating profligate water use, the contradiction persists to this day, if now in the globally discursive guise of “ecologically sustainable development.”

    My second book project, tentatively entitled “The Climate of Revolution: The case of Mexico,” analyzes the role of climate change, and in particular drought, on the coming, process and consequences of the Mexican Revolution. The book aims to integrate historical climatology with social history by contextualizing climate – or long-term meteorological phenomena that constitute an observable pattern socially and culturally perceived as such by people residing in a bounded geographical region with common ecological features – as one among numerous complex factors explaining how and why people make revolutions when and where they do.

    I teach a wide range of undergraduate and graduate courses in Mexican, Latin American, and comparative and global history on topics such as environmental change, technology, development, international relations, revolution and film.

  • Tobias Wolff

    Tobias Wolff

    Ward W. and Priscilla B. Woods Professor, Emeritus

    BioTobias Wolff is the author of the novels The Barracks Thief and Old School, the memoirs This Boy's Life and In Pharaoh's Army, and the short story collections In the Garden of the North American Martyrs, Back in the World, and The Night in Question. His most recent collection of short stories, Our Story Begins, won The Story Prize for 2008. Other honors include the PEN/Malamud Award and the Rea Award - both for excellence in the short story - the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and the PEN/Faulkner Award. He has also been the editor of Best American Short Stories, The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Short Stories, and A Doctor's Visit: The Short Stories of Anton Chekhov. His work appears regularly in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Harper's, and other magazines and literary journals.

  • Alex Woloch

    Alex Woloch

    Richard W. Lyman Professor of the Humanities

    BioAlex Woloch received his B.A. and PhD in Comparative Literature. He teaches and writes about literary criticism, narrative theory, the history of the novel, and nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature. He is the author of The One vs. The Many: Minor Characters and the Space of the Protagonist in the Novel (Princeton UP, 2003), which attempts to reestablish the centrality of characterization — the fictional representation of human beings — within narrative poetics. He is also the author of Or Orwell: Writing and Democratic Socialism (Harvard UP, 2016), which takes up the literature-and-politics question through a close reading of George Orwell’s generically experimental non-fiction prose. A new book in progress, provisionally entitled Partial Representation, will consider the complicated relationship between realism and form in a variety of media, genres and texts. This book will focus on the paradoxical ways in which form is at once necessary, and inimical, to representation. Woloch is also the co-editor, with Peter Brooks of Whose Freud?: The Place of Psychoanalysis in Contemporary Culture (Yale UP, 2000).

  • Jeffrey Wong

    Jeffrey Wong

    Research/Finance Manager, Psychology

    Current Role at StanfordJeff is responsible for supervising a team of two financial analysts that supports the Psychology Department’s sponsored grants portfolio and faculty member’s financial accounts. He is directly involved with assisting faculty members with budgeting and submitting sponsored research proposals, and managing the financial aspects of their sponsored awards. Furthermore, Jeff serves as the Psychology Department’s main financial liaison with other university departments and schools, the Office of Sponsored Research and other academic institutions involved in collaborative research projects. Jeff also supports the Department Manager in managing the department’s operating budget and accounts.

  • Wing Hung Wong

    Wing Hung Wong

    Stephen R. Pierce Family Goldman Sachs Professor in Science and Human Health, Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent interest centers on the application of statistics to biology and medicine. We are particularly interested in questions concerning gene regulation, genome interpretation and their applications to precision medicine.

  • Allen Wood

    Allen Wood

    Ward W. and Priscilla B. Woods Professor, Emeritus

    BioAllen Wood's interests are in the history of modern philosophy, especially Kant and German idealism, and in ethics and social philosophy. He was born in Seattle, Washington: B. A. Reed College in Portland, Oregon, Ph.D. Yale University. He has held regular professorships at Cornell University, Yale University, and Stanford University, where he is Ward W. and Priscilla B. Woods Professor emeritus. He has also held visiting appointments at the University of Michigan, University of California at San Diego and Oxford University, where he was Isaiah Berlin Visiting Professor in 2005. During year-long periods of research, he has been affiliated with the Freie Universität Berlin in 1983-84 and the Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn in 1991-1992. Wood is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Allen Wood is author of many articles and chapters in philosophical journals and anthologies. The book-length publications he has authored include: Kant's Moral Religion (1970, reissued 2009), Kant's Rational Theology (1978, reissued 2009), Karl Marx (1981, second expanded edition 2004), Hegel's Ethical Thought (1990), Kant's Ethical Thought (1999), Unsettling Obligations (2002), Kant (2004) and Kantian Ethics (2008). His latest book is The Free Development of Each: Studies in Freedom, Right and Ethics in Classical German Philosophy (Oxford University Press, 2014), co-authored with Dieter Schönecker Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals: A Commentary (Harvard University Press, 2015). (A German language version of this commentary has gone through four editions since 2002.) His next book, Fichte's Ethical Thought, is due to be published by Oxford University Press in 2016.

    Books by Wood have appeared in Hebrew, Turkish, Portuguese, Iranian and Chinese translation. With Paul Guyer, Wood is co-general editor of the Cambridge Edition of Kant's Writings, for which he has edited, translated or otherwise contributed to six volumes. Among the other books Wood has edited are Self and Nature in Kant's Philosophy (1984), Hegel: Elements of the Philosophy of Right (1991), Kant: Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals (2002), Fichte: Attempt at a Critique of All Revelation (2010), and, with Songsuk Susan Hahn, the Cambridge History of Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century (1790-1870) (2012). He is on the editorial board of eight philosophy journals, five book series and the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

    In the past four years, Allen Wood has taught annual three-day intensive mini-courses at Stanford in early June. His co-teachers in these courses have been Marcia Baron (Indiana University), Frederick Neuhouser (Columbia University, Barnard College) and Arthur Ripstein (University of Toronto). At Indiana University Allen Wood has taught courses on the history of modern philosophy, modern political philosophy, Kant, Fichte and existentialism.

  • Christine Min Wotipka

    Christine Min Wotipka

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCross-national analyses of gender, leadership, and higher education, and of representations of women's and children's rights in school textbooks. Other projects relate to mothers' aspirations for children in India, education programs for married immigrant women in the Republic of Korea, and understandings of the history of slavery among youth in the United States.

  • Adam Wright

    Adam Wright

    Ph.D. Student in Physics, admitted Autumn 2012

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI'm Interested in all things observational cosmology, but particularly weak gravitational lensing and galaxy cluster cosmology. This is an exciting time for these fields because the LSST will be unleashed in a few years and we'll be measuring the universe to such a high degree of precision we're bound to overthrow some paradigms in cosmology and uncover something new out in the cosmos.

  • Qingyun Wu

    Qingyun Wu

    Ph.D. Student in Economics, admitted Autumn 2017
    Ph.D. Student in Management Science and Engineering, admitted Autumn 2014

    BioQingyun Wu is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University.

    RESEARCH AREA: Market Design, Game Theory

    RESEARCH INTEREST:
    Qingyun is interested in market design and game theory. In particular, he enjoy analyzing matching problems using combinatorial techniques. For example, one of his projects is investigating envy-free matchings and stable matchings through their lattice structures (Tarski's fixed point theorem etc).

    Currently, he is looking to study market design problems in video games (like the match making in League of Legends, the auction house in FIFA series etc). And I am looking for research partners in this area! Feel free to contact me if you are interested.

  • Yan Xia

    Yan Xia

    Assistant Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOrganic Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Organic Optoelectronic Materials, Microporous Polymers, Responsive Polymers, Polymer Networks, Self-Assembly

  • Shicong Xie

    Shicong Xie

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe coordination between cell growth and cell cycle in vivo.

  • Xiaoze Xie

    Xiaoze Xie

    Paul L. and Phyllis Wattis Professor in Art

    BioXiaoze Xie received his Master of Fine Art degrees from the Central Academy of Arts & Design in Beijing and the University of North Texas. He has had solo exhibitions at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, AZ; Dallas Visual Art Center, TX; Modern Chinese Art Foundation, Gent, Belgium; Charles Cowles Gallery, New York; Gallery Paule Anglim, San Francisco; Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto; China Art Archives and Warehouse, Beijing; Gaain Gallery, Seoul; Devin Borden Hiram Butler Gallery, Houston, TX; among others. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions including Shu: Reinventing Books in Contemporary Chinese Art at the China Institute Gallery in New York and Seattle Asian Art Museum, and the traveling exhibition Regeneration: Contemporary Chinese Art from China and the US. His 2004 solo at Charles Cowles was reviewed in “The New York Times”, “Art in America” and "Art Asia Pacific". More recent shows have been reviewed in “Chicago Tribune”, “The Globe and Mail” and “San Francisco Chronicle”. His work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art and the Arizona State University Art Museum. Xie received the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant (2003) and artist awards from Phoenix Art Museum (1999) and Dallas Museum of Art (1996). Xie is the Paul L. & Phyllis Wattis Professor of Art at Stanford University.

  • Hangping Xu

    Hangping Xu

    Ph.D. Student in Chinese, admitted Autumn 2013
    Ph.D. Minor, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

    BioHangping Xu is a doctoral candidate at Stanford University, with two Master's degrees in Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies. He has a Ph.D minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; additionally, he participates in Stanford's Digital Humanities Initiative, exploring the utilizations, in research and pedagogy, of visualization and mapping technologies as well as theoretically pondering the ways in which technology has altered traditional notions of literacy, visuality, public space and civic participation. Transnational and interdisciplinary in its approach, his research focuses on modern and contemporary Chinese literature, film, and culture; he is also interested in theories of Comparative Literature and World Literature, literary theory, rhetoric, aesthetics, the intersection of philosophy and literature. His publications have appeared or are forthcoming in peer-reviewed journals such as Modern Chinese Literature and Culture (MCLC), Chinese Literature: Essays, Articles, Reviews (CLEAR), Critical Multilingualism Studies, Frontiers of Literary Studies in China, and Pacific Affairs, as well as from Cambridge University Press (book chapter). For a special issue of the journal Chinese Literature Today (forthcoming in 2018), he is co-editing a collection titled Crip China: Post-Mao Discourses of Disability, Gender, and Class.

    His dissertation, "Broken Bodies as Agents: Disability Aesthetics and Politics in Modern Chinese Culture," investigates the shifting representations and performances of the disabled body in Chinese fiction, film, and popular culture over the long twentieth century. Drawing upon political and moral philosophy, critical theory, anthropology, literary and cultural studies, the dissertation project tracks the hegemonic establishment, following the birth of the modern nation-state, of what can be called the ideology of ability (or ableism); it seeks to reconstruct disability in political, rather than pathological, terms, critically examining the manners in which the disabled body figures at the intersection of aesthetics, ethics, and politics. The cultural and symbolic fascination with the disabled body indexes the processes in which a normative collective articulates its moral identity and eases its political anxiety. The cultural and political investment in disability, furthermore, registers the productive and malleable place of the disabled body, because its excessively corporal and often spectacularized embodiment conceptually and aesthetically challenges how a culture defines what it means to be human, thus marking what Martha Nussbaum calls the “frontiers of justice.” Not only does the dissertation excavate the Chinese genealogy of disability so as to shed light on Chinese political and moral modernity, but also by critiquing the representational schemes of disability it probes into the ethical implications for disability justice.

    His papers have been presented at major conferences such as the American Comparative Literature Association annual meeting, the International Society for the History of Rhetoric biennial conference, the Association for Asian Studies annual conference, and the Modern Language Association annual convention. He has taught language, literature, film, writing and rhetoric classes at the college level for more than six years. In 2015, he won the Centennial Teaching Award from Stanford University. The other distinctions that he has received include the Mori-ASPAC Best Paper Prize from Asian Studies on the Pacific Coast Annual Conference, the Best Presentation Award from the Chinese Language Teachers Association of California (CLTAC) annual conference, and the "National Best Speaker" award in the English Debating Competition of China. His research has received funding from, among others, the Hoover Institute, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford Center for East Asian Studies, and Office of Vice Provost for Graduate Education.