School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 75 Results

  • Robert K. Jackler, MD

    Robert K. Jackler, MD

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTobacco advertising - please see below for details

    Clinical: Development of innovative surgical methods, via the cranial base, to expose inaccessible intracranial disease. Surgical simulation and robotics. Evidence based outcomes analysis in acoustic neuroma and other tumors of the cerebellopontine angle.

    Medical history - especially the history of otology, neurosurgery, deafness, and quackery.

  • Peter K.  Jackson

    Peter K.  Jackson

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology (Baxter Labs) and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCell cycle and cyclin control of DNA replication .

  • Charlotte D. Jacobs M.D.

    Charlotte D. Jacobs M.D.

    Drs. Ben and A. Jess Shenson Professor in the School of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Interests: general oncology, sarcomas. Research Interests: clinical trials in solid tumors.

  • Lisa Robin Jacobs, MD, MBA

    Lisa Robin Jacobs, MD, MBA

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Jacobs is a child, adolescent & adult psychiatrist in private practice in Menlo Park, CA and an Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences of the Stanford University School of Medicine. She serves as the Assistant Director of The Pegasus Physician Writers at Stanford and is the Editor at Large of The Pegasus Review. She eared a BA from Cornell University, an MBA from the University of Rochester, and completed medical school at Brown University.

  • Richard  A. Jaffe

    Richard A. Jaffe

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical and laboratory research activities are currently focused on developing new and sensitive means for detecting the onset of cerebral ischemia using both electrophysiological and advanced optical techniques.

  • Prasanna Jagannathan

    Prasanna Jagannathan

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    BioI am an Infectious Diseases specialist with a research program in human immunology focused on malaria-specific immune responses in pregnancy and infancy. My current research program is to further our understanding of the mechanisms of clinical immunity to malaria through field-based studies, and to better understand the immunologic consequences of malaria control interventions.

    Given the profound global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are also testing novel immune modulating therapeutics for the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infected patients with mild infection (NCT 04331899). In this study 120 SARS-CoV-2 infected patients (both symptomatic and asymptomatic) are being randomized to receive Lambda vs. placebo to test the hypothesis that SARS-CoV-2-infected individuals given Lambda at the time of diagnosis have a shortened duration of viral shedding in comparison to patients given placebo. I serve as as the co-PI of this study along with Dr. Upi Singh at Stanford.

  • Siddhartha Jaiswal

    Siddhartha Jaiswal

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe identified a common disorder of aging called clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP). CHIP occurs due to certain somatic mutations in blood stem cells and represents a precursor state for blood cancer, but is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. We hope to understand more about the biology and clinical implications of CHIP using human and model system studies.

  • Michelle L. James

    Michelle L. James

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) and of Neurology
    Instructor, Radiology- Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe primary aim of my lab is to improve the diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases by developing translational molecular imaging agents for visualizing neuroimmune interactions underlying conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke.

  • Safwan Jaradeh, MD

    Safwan Jaradeh, MD

    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical interests include autonomic disorders, small fiber neuropathies and the development of effective methods of testing and treating these disorders. Prior work has focused on small fiber painful and autonomic neuropathies; syndromes of orthostatic intolerance and syncope; gastrointestinal motility dysfunction; cyclic vomiting; protacted Gastroesophageal Reflux; non-allergic rhinitis syndromes; and the relationship between the autonomic nervous system and normal or abnormal sleep. Additional areas of interest include the neurology of phonation and swallowing disorders, and peripheral nerve injury and repair.

  • Ted Jardetzky

    Ted Jardetzky

    Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Jardetzky laboratory is studying the structures and mechanisms of macromolecular complexes important in viral pathogenesis, allergic hypersensitivities and the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation, with an interest in uncovering novel conceptual approaches to intervening in disease processes. Ongoing research projects include studies of paramyxovirus and herpesvirus entry mechanisms, IgE-receptor structure and function and TGF-beta ligand signaling pathways.

  • Daniel Jarosz

    Daniel Jarosz

    Associate Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory studies conformational switches in evolution, disease, and development. We focus on how molecular chaperones, proteins that help other biomolecules to fold, affect the phenotypic output of genetic variation. To do so we combine classical biochemistry and genetics with systems-level approaches. Ultimately we seek to understand how homeostatic mechanisms influence the acquisition of biological novelty and identify means of manipulating them for therapeutic and biosynthetic benefit.

  • R Brooke Jeffrey

    R Brooke Jeffrey

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPancreatic MDCT
    Thyroid ultrasound/biopsy
    Virtual Colonoscopy
    Imaging of appendicitis
    Hepatic MDCT
    Capsule ultrasound (wireless) of GI tract

  • Stefanie S. Jeffrey, MD

    Stefanie S. Jeffrey, MD

    John and Marva Warnock Professor, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Jeffrey led the multidisciplinary team from the Schools of Medicine, Engineering, and Genome Technology Center that invented the MagSweeper, an automated device that immunomagnetically captures live circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patient blood for single cell analysis or culture. Her lab also works on microfluidic technologies for tumor cell capture, characterization, and growth - with the goal of defining individual patient response to newer biologically-based cancer therapies.

  • Michele Jehenson

    Michele Jehenson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr Jehenson is an avid lover of wildlife and the outdoors. She finds peace and balance in the mountains, summer and winter.
    She lives in Los Gatos , CA where she maintains a private practice at the Bay Area Pain and Wellness Center.
    She is a commentators on Health Revolution Radio and is an advocate for integrative, non-surgical treament for facial pain.

  • Michael Jeng

    Michael Jeng

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests focus on: 1) histiocytic disorders, such as Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), and 2) vascular anomalies and malformations.

  • Susy Jeng

    Susy Jeng

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Operations

    BioDr. Susy Jeng is Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology at Stanford Children’s Hospital at Stanford University. Dr. Jeng received her A.B. at Harvard College and M.D. at the University of California, San Diego. She completed her pediatrics residency at University of California, San Francisco and is board-certified in pediatrics. After practicing general pediatrics for two years, she returned to UCSF for neurology residency. Upon completion of her residencies, she joined the faculty at Stanford as a general child neurologist with a special interest in medical education. She is the site director for the Stanford medical student neurology clerkship and the pediatric neurology liaison to the Stanford pediatrics residency program.

  • Kristin Jensen

    Kristin Jensen

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a clinical translational investigator with a primary interest in breast cancer biology, and the use of investigational and clinical ancillary techniques such as gene and tissue microarray analysis and immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis and prognosis of this disease. As a practicing cytopathologist, I also have an interest in improving the fine needle aspiration biopsy diagnosis of breast lesions, again using immunohistochemistry and gene expression analysis as adjuncts to cytomorphology.

  • Livnat Jerby

    Livnat Jerby

    Assistant Professor of Genetics

    BioLivnat Jerby is an Assistant Professor of Genetics at Stanford University. Her research focuses on multicellular dynamics, as a disease driver and therapeutic avenue, particularly in the context of cancer immunology. In her work, she aims to identify the drivers, molecular underpinnings, and causal structure of multifactorial immune evasion mechanisms, and use this information to identify new and more effective ways to augment and unleash targeted immunity via combinatorial interventions. To address this challenge at scale, she develops integrative approaches, fusing single-cell sequencing and imaging with machine learning, genetic and environmental perturbations.  

    Thus far, her research provided new perspectives to key facets of tumor biology, encompassing metabolism, genetics, and immunology. As a postdoctoral fellow in Aviv Regev's lab at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, she identified regulators of T cell exclusion and dysfunction. She holds a B.Sc. in Computer Science and Biology and obtained her PhD in 2016 from Tel Aviv University, where she worked with Eytan Ruppin and developed new ways to interrogate cancer metabolism and genetics.

    This fall Livnat joined Stanford Genetics to establish a multidisciplinary lab that will harness machine learning in combination with clinical data and extensive functional testing to dissect and target immune dysregulation in cancer, aiming to leverage the versatile, interconnected function of genes, cells, and tissues for disease detection, prevention, and treatment.

    Her research has been generously supported by the Schmidt Family Foundation, Rothschild Foundation, the Cancer Research Institute (CRI), the Burroughs Wellcome Fund (BWF), Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance (OCRA), Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and Chan Zuckerberg Biohub initiative.

  • John Jay Jernick

    John Jay Jernick

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHealth services research; guided self-care; health, education; outcome oriented decision processes.

  • Hanlee P. Ji

    Hanlee P. Ji

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCancer genomics and genetics, translational applications of next generation sequencing technologies, development of molecular signatures as prognostic and predictive biomarkers in oncology, primary genomic and proteomic technology development, cancer rearrangements, genome sequencing, big data analysis

  • Xiaolin Jia

    Xiaolin Jia

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsQuality improvement, palliative care

  • Can "Angela" Jiang

    Can "Angela" Jiang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Can "Angela" Jiang is a board certified family physician who enjoys caring for the whole family, from newborn care to geriatrics. She has special interests in women's health, adolescent health, pediatrics, and medical student education. She specializes in primary care procedures including gynecologic procedures.

    Prior to medical school, Dr. Jiang was a high school biology teacher in Chicago with Teach for America and loves combining her passions for teaching and medicine on a daily basis at Stanford Family Medicine. Dr. Jiang also teaches residents at the Stanford Health Care-O'Connor Hospital residency program and is the director of the O’Connor-Stanford Leaders in Education Residency Program (OSLER). Dr. Jiang is also passionate about community outreach and works with the Stanford Youth Diabetes Coaches Program.

    Outside of clinic, she enjoys hiking, reading, group fitness classes, traveling, and running after her two young kids.

  • Wei Jiang

    Wei Jiang

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Human Gene Therapy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have a particular interest in MHC-II antigen presentation and MHC-II-associated autoimmunity that are linked to environmental triggers. Relevant diseases include narcolepsy, celiac disease, influenza infection and COVID-19. Given multidisciplinary background, I also have developed high throughput engineering tools to advance diagnosis and/or treatment of these diseases.
    Projects include:
    •To study DO/DM regulated MHC-II antigen presentation in relevant to T cell-B cell immunity.
    •To study MHC-II-restricted CD4+ T cells cross-reactive with self-protein and viral antigen (i.e., derived from the H1N1 influenza virus or the SARS-CoV-2 virus).
    •To develop T cell receptor mimics for identification of gluten presenting cells in celiac disease.
    •To develop high throughput yeast display system for MHC-II ligand identification.

  • Tomas Jimenez

    Tomas Jimenez

    Professor of Sociology

    BioTomás Jiménez is Associate Professor of Sociology and Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. He is also Director of the undergraduate program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and Director of graduate studies in sociology. His research and writing focus on immigration, assimilation, social mobility, and ethnic and racial identity. His forthcoming book, The Other Side of Assimilation: How Immigrants are Changing American Life (University of California Press, 2017), uses interviews from a race and class spectrum of Silicon Valley residents to show how a relational form of assimilation changes both newcomers (immigrants and their children) and established individuals (people born in the US to US-born parents). His first book, Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans, Immigration, and Identity(University of California Press, 2010) draws on interviews and participant observation to understand how uninterrupted Mexican immigration influences the ethnic identity of later-generation Mexican Americans. The book was awarded the American Sociological Association’s Sociology of Latinos/as Section Distinguished Book Award. Professor Jiménez has also published this research in the American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, International Migration Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Social Science Quarterly, DuBois Review, and the Annual Review of Sociology.

    He is currently working several other projects. The first looks at how immigration becomes part of American national identity by studying a sample of high school US history textbooks from 1930-2005. A second project (with social psychologist John Dovidio (Yale), political scientist Deborah Schildkraut (Tufts), and social psychologist Yuen Ho (UCLA), uses survey data (with embedded experiments) and in-depth interviews to understand how state-level immigration policies shape the sense of belonging and related intergroup attitudes, behaviors, and support for immigration policies among immigrants and host-society members in the United States. This project is funded by the Russell Sage Foundation and the United Parcel Service Endowment Fund at Stanford. A third project (with graduate students Anna Boch and Katharina Roessler) uses Yelp! data to examine the contextual factors that predict whether Mexican food has entered a mainstream. In another project, Professor Jiménez, with Marrianne Cooper (Clayman Institute, Stanford University), and Chrystal Redekopp (Laboratory for Social Research, Stanford), are studying how Silicon Valley residents find alternative forms of housing in one of the most expensive real estate markets in the world.

    Professor Jiménez has taught at the University of California, San Diego. He has been named a Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer (2017-19). He has also been an Irvine Fellow at the New America Foundation and a Sage Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University (CASBS). He was the American Sociological Association Congressional Fellow in the office of U.S. Rep. Michael Honda, where he served as a legislative aide for immigration, veterans’ affairs, housing, and election reform. His writing on policy has appeared in reports for the Immigration Policy Center, and he has written opinion-editorials on the topic of immigrant assimilation in several major news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, CNN.com, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the San Diego Union-Tribune.

  • Booil Jo

    Booil Jo

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLatent Variable Modeling, Causal Inference, Longitudinal Data Analysis, Missing Data Analysis, Mixture and Growth Mixture Modeling, Prevention Science Methodology.

  • Torsten Joerger

    Torsten Joerger

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in using the tools of epidemiology to study antimicrobial use and optimize the care of children with infectious diseases.

  • Nawal L. Atwan Johansen, MD

    Nawal L. Atwan Johansen, MD

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Educational Programs and Services (EPS)

    BioDr. Nawal L. Atwan Johansen, MD, FACP is a Board Certified Internal Medicine Physician. She practices as a primary care internal medicine physician in Silicon Valley and the Bay Area. She received her BA from Princeton University, MD from Harvard Medical School, and Internal Medicine Residency training at Stanford Hospital and Clinics. She served on the Stanford Medical School faculty as Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine. In recognition of her excellence in patient care, she received the Stanford Health Care Faculty Recognition Award for Patient Centeredness for achieving the 99th percentile of patient satisfaction and likelihood to recommend scores.

    Dr. Johansen was selected by the Stanford Department of Medicine and the Stanford Health Care Administration to be the founding Medical Director of Stanford Health Care’s Clinical Advice Services to build a clinical triage program from the ground up for the entire Stanford Health Care enterprise, serving over 100 specialties, 2000 faculty physicians and over 1 million patients.

    Dr. Johansen is an experienced primary care physician focused on providing personalized, high quality care to her patients. Her expertise is in disease diagnosis and management, prevention of disease, health promotion, and advanced practices to promote long term wellness. Dr. Johansen has a private concierge medicine practice in Palo Alto, California. She is credentialed at Stanford Hospital and is a member of the Adjunct Clinical Teaching Faculty at Stanford Medical School.

  • Esther M. John

    Esther M. John

    Professor (Research) of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. John has extensive expertise in conducting population-based epidemiologic studies and has led as Principal Investigator multiple large-scale studies, including multi-center studies with a study site in the San Francisco Bay Area with its diverse population. Many of her studies and collaborations investigated cancer health disparities. Her research has focused on the role of modifiable lifestyle factors (e.g., body size, physical activity, diet), hormonal factors, early-life exposures, genetic variants, and gene-environment interactions; differences in risk factors by race/ethnicity, breast cancer subtypes, and prostate cancer subtypes; risk factors for familial breast cancer and second primary breast cancer, as well as prognostic factors related to survival disparities.

    As Principal Investigator, Dr. John has led a number of studies conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area, including:

    - the Northern California site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry, an on-going prospective multi-generational cohort of over 13,000 families established in 1995 at six international sites;
    - the Northern California site of the WECARE Study that investigates risk factors for second primary breast cancer;
    - the California site of the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study that investigated genetic variability and breast cancer risk and survival in Hispanic and non-Hispanic white populations in the context of genetic admixture;
    - the Breast Cancer Etiology in Minorities (BEM) Study, a pooled analysis of risk factors for breast cancer subtypes in racial/ethnic minorities;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Breast Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study in nearly 5,000 Hispanic, African American and non-Hispanic white women that investigated the role of modifiable lifestyle factors and other risk factors;
    - the San Francisco Bay Area Prostate Cancer Study, a population-based case-control study of lifestyle and genetic risk factors for advanced and localized disease.

    These studies collected and pooled extensive data and biospecimens and continue to support numerous ancillary studies, collaborations and international consortia and have contributed to a better understanding of cancer risk and survival in racial/ethnic minority populations.

    Dr. John is also a founding PI of the LEGACY Girls Study, an on-going prospective cohort established in 2011 that investigates early life exposures in relation to pubertal development outcomes, breast tissue characteristics, and behavioral and psychosocial outcomes in the context of having a family history or breast cancer.

  • Roy M John, MD, PhD

    Roy M John, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Roy John is Professor of Medicine and Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiologist at Stanford Hospitals since 2021. Dr. John has over 25 years of expertise in the management of complex cardiac arrhythmias, including catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, supraventricular tachycardia and the WPW syndrome. He has extensive experience with implantation of pacemakers and defibrillators and lead extraction. He was a participant in the early clinical trials of ablation for atrial fibrillation and investigated the use of specialized catheter ablation techniques for ventricular tachycardia. He has authored several book chapters and published over 120 original research articles. He is on the editorial board for several reputed, peer reviewed journals in cardiology and cardiac electrophysiology, and a member of educational committees for Heart Rhythm Society and the American College of Cardiology. He is past president of the New England Electrophysiology Society and a recipient of teaching awards for mentoring trainees in cardiology and internal medicine.