School of Medicine


Showing 1-39 of 39 Results

  • David T. Paik

    David T. Paik

    Instructor, Cardiovascular Institute

    BioDr. David Paik is an instructor at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. At Stanford, his focus is to utilize single-cell omics to elucidate patient-specific mechanisms of various cardiovascular diseases, characterize embryonic heart development, and optimize differentiation of iPSCs to subtypes of cardiovascular cells. Dr. Paik received his BA in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Boston University (2010) and PhD in Cell and Developmental Biology at Vanderbilt University (2015). During his PhD training, Dr. Paik investigated the endogenous cardiac repair mechanisms in the adult heart following ischemic injury such as myocardial infarction, with focus on the role of Wnt signaling pathway on coronary vessel formation and plasticity of endothelial cells during cardiac tissue repair. At this time Dr. Paik completed HHMI/VUMC Certificate Program in Molecular Medicine, where he was supervised by his clinical mentor Dr. Douglas Sawyer to interact with congestive heart failure patients and to bridge clinical sciences with basic and translational cardiovascular research. Since 2016 he has been mentored by Dr. Joseph Wu at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. Dr. Paik is currently supported by the NIH NHLBI K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Award.

  • Latha Palaniappan, MD, MS

    Latha Palaniappan, MD, MS

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Palaniappan has published over 200 peer reviewed manuscripts, abstracts, and book chapters over the last 20 years in the areas of chronic disease prevention and treatment in diverse populations. She has expertise in epidemiological research using big data, use of electronic health records for research, and clinical trials.

  • Alan C. Pao

    Alan C. Pao

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) and, by courtesy, of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are broadly interested in how the kidneys control salt, water, and electrolyte homeostasis in the body. Our disease focus is on kidney stone disease. We use cultured kidney cells, transgenic mice, human plasma/urine samples, and electronic health record data to study the pathogenesis of kidney stone disease. Our therapeutic focus is on the development of small molecule compounds that can be used for kidney stone prevention.

  • Vedant Pargaonkar

    Vedant Pargaonkar

    Member (Staff), Cardiovascular Institute

    BioMy long-term research interests involve development of algorithms using computational methods for early detection of coronary pathophysiology including, endothelial dysfunction and microvascular dysfunction (MVD) and/or a myocardial bridge (MB) in patients with angina and no obstructive coronary artery disease (NOCAD) and the identification of novel target therapies for primary prevention and improved prognosis in these patients. Under the mentorship of Dr. Jennifer Tremmel in Cardiovascular medicine at Stanford, I have been systematically studying to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of these patients, as well as the optimal use of diagnostic testing and treatment using the angina and no-obstructive CAD Registry at Stanford. In collaboration with other investigators in this field, we have published multiple scientific articles highlighting the limitations of current testing in this population and identification of novel diagnostic tools for early diagnosis and management of patients with angina and no obstructive CAD. My research also focuses on myocardial infarction (MI) in women, particularly spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD). I have been involved in the design and execution of the first international collaborative study in SCAD, investigating peripartum vs. non-peripartum SCAD. This is analyzing the largest cohort of patients recruited from multiple US and non-US sites to understand the pathophysiological differences in these patient cohorts.

  • Victoria Parikh

    Victoria Parikh

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioDr. Parikh is cardiologist specializing in the care of patients with inherited cardiovascular diseases. She completed clinical cardiology fellowship at Stanford School of Medicine and her medical residency at the University of California, San Francisco. Funded by research grant from the NIH, she currently studies multiple causes of cardiomyopathy in the laboratory. She has a particular clinical and scientific interest in inherited arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies, which are an increasingly recognized disease entity. Dr. Parikh is currently using patient cohort genetics, high throughput molecular biology and human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes to study variant pathogenicity in this disease.

  • Dr. Seung-min Park

    Dr. Seung-min Park

    Instructor, Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy educational background and training have focused on creating micro- and nano-scale devices using newly-developed techniques and applying these processes to advance research in molecular/cellular biology. So far, my area of expertise has focused on developing methods to pattern, sort, and analyze biological materials, especially circulating tumor cells. Through my work I have created multiple Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) and Nanoelectromechanical System (NEMS) devices that can not only identify miniscule mass changes in microfluidics, but integrate mass spectrometry for molecular detection, and manipulate oligonucleotide species for sort and analysis. I am confident that my background provides the expertise in the design and fabrication of micro-/nano-scale functional modules necessary for developing next-generation devices in solving critical problems in biomedical engineering.

  • Chirag Patel, MD, PhD

    Chirag Patel, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology - Rad/Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeuro-oncology, Clinical Trials, Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields), Molecular/PET Imaging, Neuroimaging, Immunotherapy, Big Data Analysis

  • Meghna Patel

    Meghna Patel

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current academic focus is in chronic heart failure and ventricular assist device.

  • Arogyaswami Paulraj

    Arogyaswami Paulraj

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Emeritus Arogyaswami Paulraj, Stanford University, is a pioneer of MIMO wireless communications, a technology break through that enables improved wireless performance. MIMO is now incorporated into all new wireless systems.

    Paulraj is the author of over 400 research papers, two textbooks, and a co-inventor in 80 US patents.

    Paulraj has won over a dozen awards, notably the National Inventors Hall of Fame (USPTO), Marconi Prize and Fellowship, 2014 and the IEEE Alexander Graham Bell Medal, 2011. He is a fellow of eight scientific / engineering national academies including the US, China, India, and Sweden. He is a fellow of IEEE and AAAS.

    In 1999, Paulraj founded Iospan Wireless Inc. - which developed and established MIMO-OFDMA wireless as the core 4G technology. Iospan was acquired by Intel Corporation in 2003. In 2004, he co-founded Beceem Communications Inc. The company became the market leader in 4G-WiMAX semiconductor and was acquired by Broadcom Corp. in 2010. In 2014 he founded Rasa Networks to develop Machine Learning tools for WiFi Networks. The company was acquired HPE in 2016.

    During his 30 years in the Indian (Navy) (1961-1991), he founded three national-level laboratories in India and headed one of India’s most successful military R&D projects – APSOH sonar. He received over a dozen awards (many at the national level) in India including the Padma Bhushan, Ati Vishist Seva Medal and the VASVIK Medal.

  • John M. Pauly

    John M. Pauly

    Reid Weaver Dennis Professor

    BioInterests include medical imaging generally, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular. Current efforts are focused on medical applications of MRI where real-time interactive imaging is important. Two examples are cardiac imaging, and the interactive guidance of interventional procedures. Specific interests include rapid methods for the excitation and acquisition of the MR signal, and the reconstruction of images from the data acquired using these approaches.

  • Ronald Pearl

    Ronald Pearl

    Dr. Richard K. and Erika N. Richards Professor
    On Leave from 12/01/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanims (molecular and cellular) of pulmonary hypertension, treatment of pulmonary hypertension, treatment of respiratory failure, treatment of septic shock, hemodynamic monitoring

  • Norbert Pelc

    Norbert Pelc

    Boston Scientific Applied Biomedical Engineering Professor and Professor of Radiology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBroadly, Dr. Pelc is interested in the physics, engineering and mathematics of medical imaging, especially computed tomography, digital x-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and hybrid multimodality systems. His current research is concentrated in the development of computed tomography systems with higher image quality and dose efficiency, in the characterization of system performance, and in the development and validation of new clinical applications.

  • Marco Perez

    Marco Perez

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioDr. Marco Perez's research goal is to better understand the fundamental causes of cardiovascular disease through the study of genetics and epidemiology. His group studies the genetic variations and environmental exposures that are associated with conditions such as atrial fibrillation and heart failure. He has led the studies of atrial fibrillation in Women's Health Initiative, one of the largest nation-wide population-based cohorts. He is currently conducting a large study monitoring for silent or asymptomatic atrial fibrillation in women from the WHI randomized to exercise intervention, and is co-PI in the Apple Heart Study, a clinical trial using the Apple Watch to screen for atrial fibrillation. He is interested in understanding the paradox that atrial fibrillation is less common in African Americans and Hispanics, despite a greater burden of risk factors such as hypertension. As director of the Stanford Inherited Arrhythmia Clinic, he evaluates families with rare inherited arrhythmias associated with sudden death such as Long QT and Brugada Syndromes and explores their links with novel genes. He is particularly interested in studying the genetic causes of very early onset atrial fibrillation. He also studies how best to use the electrocardiogram to identify patients at risk for atrial fibrillation and athletes at risk for life-threatening arrhythmias due to conditions such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. His genetic studies have led to the discovery of promising novel therapeutic targets that his group is now studying at a functional level. Dr. Perez receives funding from NIH/NHLBI (R01), Apple Inc., the Weston Havens Foundation, The Stanford Cardiovascular Division and the Stanford SPARK program.

  • Alexander C. Perino

    Alexander C. Perino

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioAlexander C. Perino MD is a cardiac electrophysiologist, clinical informaticist, and cardiovascular researcher. In his clinical role, Dr. Perino treats patients with heart rhythm disorders at Stanford Health Care, performing catheter ablations and cardiac device implantations. In addition to complex ablation (e.g., atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia ablation), Dr. Perino has expertise implanting leadless pacemakers, subcutaneous ICDs, and conduction system pacing leads (i.e., His bundle and left bundle branch area pacing leads). Dr. Perino is the medical informatics director for the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford Health Care, providing informatics direction to improve 1) the quality and safety of cardiovascular care delivery and 2) patient and clinician experience derived from the electronic health record and related information and communication technologies. As a cardiovascular researcher, Dr. Perino uses large datasets to examine quality of care, outcomes, and risk prediction for heart rhythm disorders and cardiovascular disease.

  • VJ Periyakoil, Geriatrics, Hospice & Palliative Medicine

    VJ Periyakoil, Geriatrics, Hospice & Palliative Medicine

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the intersection of biological, psychosocial and cultural aspects of care of persons with chronic and serious illnesses including dementia.

  • Mark Perlroth, MD

    Mark Perlroth, MD

    Professor (Clinical) of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Adult Congenital Heart Disease
    2. Cardiac Transplantation
    3. General Cardiology
    4. Porphyrias

  • Ed Petrossian

    Ed Petrossian

    Clinical Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Petrossian has expertise in complex pediatric and congenital cardiovascular surgical repairs. He has published several journal articles and book chapters with an emphasis on the extracardiac conduit Fontan operation.

  • Martin Pfaller

    Martin Pfaller

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    BioDr. Martin R. Pfaller is an Instructor in the Department of Pediatrics (Cardiology) in the group of Alison L. Marsden. He received his B.Sc., M.Sc., and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the Technical University of Munich, working with Wolfgang A. Wall. During his Ph.D., he validated an efficient yet physiologically accurate boundary condition to account for the mechanical support of the heart within its surroundings, which has been adopted by various research groups worldwide. He further demonstrated how projection-based model order reduction could speed up model personalization from patient data, such as magnetic resonance imaging or blood pressure measurements. His current work focuses on cardiovascular fluid dynamics. He developed reduced-physics models to make blood flow simulations faster and more reliable. Further, he implemented a fluid-solid-growth interaction model in blood vessels in collaboration with Jay D. Humphrey at Yale University. His future research will predict the heart’s long-term function in heart diseases, supported by an NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00). He will quantify the risk of heart failure after a heart attack with a stability analysis validated with imaging data in swine and humans. This research will improve our understanding of biomechanical mechanisms leading to heart failure and help to identify patients at risk, enable personalized therapies, and facilitate the optimal design of medical devices.

  • Ada Poon

    Ada Poon

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on providing theoretical foundations and engineering platforms for realizing electronics that seamlessly integrate with the body. Such systems will allow precise recording or modulation of physiological activity, for advancing basic scientific discovery and for restoring or augmenting biological functions for clinical applications.

  • Richard Popp

    Richard Popp

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAcademic-Industrial relations; Ethics of invention.

  • Matthew Porteus

    Matthew Porteus

    Sutardja Chuk Professor of Definitive and Curative Medicine

    BioDr. Porteus was raised in California and was a local graduate of Gunn High School before completing A.B. degree in “History and Science” at Harvard University where he graduated Magna Cum Laude and wrote an thesis entitled “Safe or Dangerous Chimeras: The recombinant DNA controversy as a conflict between differing socially constructed interpretations of recombinant DNA technology.” He then returned to the area and completed his combined MD, PhD at Stanford Medical School with his PhD focused on understanding the molecular basis of mammalian forebrain development with his PhD thesis entitled “Isolation and Characterization of TES-1/DLX-2: A Novel Homeobox Gene Expressed During Mammalian Forebrain Development.” After completion of his dual degree program, he was an intern and resident in Pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital and then completed his Pediatric Hematology/Oncology fellowship in the combined Boston Chidlren’s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute program. For his fellowship and post-doctoral research he worked with Dr. David Baltimore at MIT and CalTech where he began his studies in developing homologous recombination as a strategy to correct disease causing mutations in stem cells as definitive and curative therapy for children with genetic diseases of the blood, particularly sickle cell disease. Following his training with Dr. Baltimore, he took an independent faculty position at UT Southwestern in the Departments of Pediatrics and Biochemistry before again returning to Stanford in 2010 as an Associate Professor. During this time his work has been the first to demonstrate that gene correction could be achieved in human cells at frequencies that were high enough to potentially cure patients and is considered one of the pioneers and founders of the field of genome editing—a field that now encompasses thousands of labs and several new companies throughout the world. His research program continues to focus on developing genome editing by homologous recombination as curative therapy for children with genetic diseases but also has interests in the clonal dynamics of heterogeneous populations and the use of genome editing to better understand diseases that affect children including infant leukemias and genetic diseases that affect the muscle. Clinically, Dr. Porteus attends at the Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital where he takes care of pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  • Guillem Pratx

    Guillem Pratx

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Physical Oncology Lab is interested in making a lasting impact on translational cancer research by building novel physical tools and methods.

  • James Priest

    James Priest

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Priest lab seeks a better understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of congenital heart disease using translational genomics, big-data, and vertebrate models of cardiac development.