School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 53 Results

  • Ralph Rabkin

    Ralph Rabkin

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr Rabkin is examining the mechanism of the acquired resistance to hormones that develops in kidney failure.In particular he is studying the impact of kidney failure on the action of growth hormone and the role of impaired signal transduction as a cause of growth hormone resistance. He is also engaged in the study of growth factors in diabetic kidney disease.

  • Thomas Raffin

    Thomas Raffin

    The Colleen and Robert Haas Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Raffin is a clinician, teacher and investigator. He retired as Chief of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine in 2004. His key areas of academic interest include the biology and management of acute lung injury; basic biology of human lung and white cells; and, key issues in biomedical ethics including withholding and withdrawing life support, health care delivery, genomics, genetic screening, and neuroethics.

  • Rishi Raj

    Rishi Raj

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    BioDr. Rishi Raj is an Clinical Professor of Medicine at Stanford University and directs the Interstitial Lung Disease program at Stanford. He specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of interstitial lung diseases and has practiced pulmonary and critical care medicine for more than 15 years. Dr. Raj's primary clinical interest and primary focus of clinical research is interstitial lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, other idiopathic interstitial lung diseases, drug induced interstitial lung diseases, interstitial lung disease associated with connective tissue diseases including scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis etc., sarcoidosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and other miscellaneous interstitial lung diseases. Dr. Raj is the principal investigator and co-investigator on multiple clinical trials evaluating new therapies for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary fibrosis/interstitial lung disease from other etiologies.

  • Kavitha Ramchandran

    Kavitha Ramchandran

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on innovative models of care delivey to understand how to integrate primary and specialist palliative care. We also do work in palliative care education and how to scale our education to be impactful and sustainable. We are evaluating online models.

    In cancer care I do research on novel therapeutics in thoracic malignancies including immunotherapy, new targeted agents, and new sequencing of approved drugs.

  • Meghan Ramsey

    Meghan Ramsey

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    BioDr. Meghan Ramsey is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree from Lafayette College in Pennsylvania with a major in Neuroscience. She then attended Stanford University for medical school where she stayed to complete her internal medicine residency, and pulmonary/critical care fellowship. Her clinical time is split between the inpatient setting in the medical ICU and the ambulatory setting in Interventional Pulmonology with a focus on thoracic malignancies. Outside of her clinical time she has a dedicated commitment to teaching, serving as a mentor for residents and fellows, as well as leading as a co-director the pulmonary physiology course for medical students.

  • Risheen Reejhsinghani

    Risheen Reejhsinghani

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioRisheen Reejhsinghani obtained her medical degree in Mumbai, India, followed by an internal medicine residency at St. Elizabeth's Medical Center in Boston, MA and cardiology fellowship at Baystate Medical Center/Tufts University School of Medicine, where she served as one of the chief fellows. She subsequently completed an advanced echocardiography fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco, and is board certified in echocardiography, general cardiology, and nuclear cardiology.

    Dr. Reejhsinghani practices as a general cardiologist in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, where she also serves as the associate director for the hospital-based consultative cardiology service. As a clinical cardiologist, she believes strongly in the tenets of evidence-based practice, diagnostic cognizance, and patient education. She also has a specific interest in the burgeoning field of Cardio-Rheumatology, focused on cardiac diseases among patients with rheumatologic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, and ankylosing spondylitis, among others. Her clinical research in this area has focused on the evaluation of structural cardiac disease and diastolic dysfunction in ankylosing spondylitis patients, primarily using echocardiography.

    Dr. Reejhsinghani has an academic focus in medical education, and believes that instilling a love for bedside medicine and the physical exam is the soundest way to empower future generations of learners. To this end, she received additional training in clinical teaching and simulation at the University of California, San Francisco, and has worked extensively on curriculum and course design. She currently serves as the associate program director of the cardiovascular medicine fellowship at Stanford, and is an associate course director for the Year 1 Practice of Medicine Course at the Stanford University medical school. Dr. Reejhsinghani also enjoys writing, particularly about medical education and has written articles for international newspapers, among other publications.

  • David Rehkopf

    David Rehkopf

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    BioI am a social epidemiologist and serve as an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. I joined the faculty at Stanford School of Medicine in 2011.

    I am currently the co-director of the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences. In this position I am committed to making high value data resources available to researchers across disciplines in order to better enable them to answer their most pressing clinical and population health questions.

    My own research is focused on understanding the health implications of the myriad decisions that are made by corporations and governments every day - decisions that profoundly shape the social and economic worlds in which we live and work. While these changes are often invisible to us on a daily basis, these seemingly minor actions and decisions form structural nudges that can create better or worse health at a population level. My work demonstrates the health implications of corporate and governmental decisions that can give the public and policy makers evidence to support new strategies for promoting health and well-being. In all of his work, I have a focus on the implications of these exposures for health inequalities.

    Since often policy and programmatic changes can take decades to influence health, my work also includes more basic research in understanding biological signals that may act as early warning signs of systemic disease, in particular accelerated aging. I examine how social and economic policy changes influence a range of early markers of disease and aging, with a particular recent focus on DNA methylation. I am supported by several grants from the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities to develop new more sensitive ways to understand the health implications of social and economic policy changes.

  • David A. Relman

    David A. Relman

    Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy investigative program focuses on human-microbe interactions and human microbial ecology, and primarily concerns the ecology of human indigenous microbial communities; a secondary interest concerns the classification of humans with systemic infectious diseases, based on features of genome-wide gene transcript abundance patterns and pther aspects of the host response.

  • Cybele A. Renault, MD, DTM&H

    Cybele A. Renault, MD, DTM&H

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Renault has devoted her career to caring for vulnerable patient populations, both domestically and overseas. She completed her medical school and residency training at the University of Chicago, caring for underserved patients on Chicago's South Side, followed by a Chief Resident year at John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County, the public hospital serving the uninsured in Chicago. She began her career in global health as an Infectious Diseases fellow at Stanford, validating low-cost HIV diagnostics in Burkina Faso, and providing clinical service and teaching in India and Zimbabwe as a fellow, and later in Thailand, Uganda, Rwanda and Kenya as one of our Infectious Diseases faculty. Her clinical work is currently focused on caring for our Veteran population, working to empower Veterans to engage in their care, often in the setting of significant mental illness.

    Dr. Renault is most passionate about medical education and program development to combat global antimicrobial resistance through antimicrobial stewardship, to create opportunities for the Internal Medicine residents centering on caring for vulnerable patient populations, and to develop impactful and sustainable programs in collaboration with our low- and middle-income partners for our Center for Innovation in Global Health. She served as Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency Program for 4 years prior to transitioning to her current role as Program Lead for Global Health, for which she leads the Global Health Track for the Internal Medicine residency program and develops global health initiatives for the Department of Medicine. She co-founded and has been director of the Stanford 2-week intensive global health course since its inception in 2012, she has structured trainee and faculty rotations based on evolving needs of our partner sites in Uganda, Rwanda and Zimbabwe, she is the primary contact for the ID/antimicrobial stewardship partnership between Stanford and Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret, Kenya, and she is leading Stanford's multi-disciplinary efforts to support our newest partner in Negele Arsi, Ethiopia.

    Dr. Renault strives to augment Stanford's contributions and support for underserved patient populations in the United States. She established resident rotations in Shiprock, New Mexico and Chinle, Arizona through the Indian Health Service, and she is Faculty Advisor for the Internal Medicine Health Equity, Advocacy and Research concentration in the residency program. She also aspires to improve resources for women physicians. In 2016, Dr. Renault established the GME Women in Medicine Leadership Council, with the intention of creating community and encouraging conversations about professional and personal life decisions as women in the field of medicine. She is passionate about mentoring through sharing personal experiences, creating an environment that encourages reflection, and building skills to address challenges unique to women in medicine.

    In 2022, in recognition of her passion for medical education and her success in program development, Dr. Renault was asked to join the leadership at Palo Alto Veterans Health Care System as Deputy Associate Chief of Staff for Education. In this role, she works with rotation directors to optimize their respective rotations to offer robust educational opportunities for trainees across specialties who are rotating at the Palo Alto VA.

  • Andrew Rezvani, M.D.

    Andrew Rezvani, M.D.

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

  • Fauzia Riaz, M.D., M.H.S.

    Fauzia Riaz, M.D., M.H.S.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Riaz is a medical oncologist specializing in breast cancer whose research focuses on novel therapeutics and approaches cancer care delivery for patients with breast cancer. She is currently a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Riaz completed formal research training during her fellowship, through Yale University’s Advanced Health Sciences Research program. This included training in biostatistics, research methodology, and health policy, ultimately culminating in the completion of a Master of Health Sciences. As faculty, she is an active member of the Stanford Breast Oncology Clinical Research Group, and currently serves as the Stanford site principal investigator and sub-investigator for several ongoing breast cancer clinical trials.

  • Stephen Richmond

    Stephen Richmond

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Stephen Richmond (he/him/his) is a family physician, educator, and health justice advocate with specific interest in racial equity in medicine. He currently serves as a clinical assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Primary Care & Population Health (PCPH) in the Stanford Department of Medicine. He completed his A.S. at Solano Community College, B.A. in Molecular & Cell Biology at UC Berkeley, M.P.H. at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and his M.D. at David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA. He is a graduate of the UCSF-San Francisco General Hospital Family & Community Medicine Residency Program.

    As a clinician, Dr. Richmond cares for individuals of all ages with a wide range of acute and chronic illnesses. He is especially passionate about providing high quality, evidenced-based care to underserved communities of color. As a researcher and educator, his interests broadly involve the intersection of race, racism, and medicine, with current projects focused on applications of Critical Race Theory to medical education and clinical care. He currently serves as the faculty director for the REACH Health Equity Scholarly Concentration within the school of Medicine and the Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion Curriculum Lead within the PCPH Division.

    Beyond Stanford, Dr. Richmond is involved in many ongoing advocacy efforts aimed at achieving health equity through individual and structural-level change. Dr. Richmond has received multiple teaching awards for his work in the space of equity, inclusion & anti-oppression in medicine, and is a routine presenter and consultant in these areas.

  • Norman Rizk

    Norman Rizk

    Berthold and Belle N. Guggenhime Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in the prevention and control of critical care-related illnesses and complications, including ventilator-associated pneumonia, spread of nosocomial infections, and prognosis of multiple organ system failure in intensive care units. Infections and complications of therapy in immunocompromised hosts, including effects of chemotherapy and hematopoetic stem cell transplants is another interest.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Professor of Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    James W. Raitt, M.D. Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab investigates the molecular mechanisms of and develops therapies to treat autoimmune and rheumatic diseases, with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, and osteoarthritis.

    The overriding objectives of our laboratory are:
    1. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying autoimmune and rheumatic diseases.
    2. To investigate the role of innate immune inflammation in osteoarthritis.
    3. To develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics

  • Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Allan and Tina Neill Professor of Lymphatic Research and Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical research includes studies on risk factor modification in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease; clinical trials involving medical therapies for peripheral arterial insufficiency; coronary angiogenesis; therapy of lymphedema; atherand photodynamic therapy in atherosclerosis.

  • Fatima Rodriguez

    Fatima Rodriguez

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioFatima Rodriguez, MD, MPH is an Assistant Professor in Cardiovascular Medicine and (by courtesy) the Stanford Prevention Research Center. She received her MD and MPH from Harvard University and completed residency in internal medicine at the Brigham and Women's Hospital. Dr. Rodriguez arrived at Stanford University in 2014, where she completed a cardiovascular medicine fellowship and served as Chief Fellow. She specializes in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, lipid disorders, and cardiovascular risk assessment in high-risk populations.

    Dr. Rodriguez’s research includes a range of topics relating to racial, ethnic, and gender disparities in cardiovascular disease prevention and developing novel interventions to address disparities.

  • Stephan Rogalla, M.D. PhD

    Stephan Rogalla, M.D. PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe research interest of myself and my lab are in the field of early cancer detection using targeted molecular spies to highlight (pre)cancerous lesions. We as well aim to improve precision medicine in autoimmune disorders like inflammatory bowel disease and oncology.

  • Albert Rogers

    Albert Rogers

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Albert (A.J.) Rogers is a Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiologist and research scientist at Stanford University. His undergraduate coursework in Biomedical Engineering at Duke University focused on neurobiology, signal processing, and computer modeling while his research investigated piezoelectric arrays for intracardiac ultrasound and computer vision of 3D ultrasound images for automated surgical robot tasks (Stephen Smith Laboratory). He earned his medical and business degrees (MD/MBA) from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and the Kenan-Flagler Business School at UNC (focus in Healthcare Entrepreneurship). He has medical technology experience ranging from basic and translational research to first-in-man studies, device development, and entrepreneurship. He completed training in Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine, and Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology at Stanford University. His research endeavors to explore mechanisms of cardiac fibrillation using techniques of signal processing, machine learning, and in silico modeling. Outside of his research and clinical pursuits, A.J. enjoys athletics of all kinds (especially soccer and sand volleyball), travelling, and cooking.

  • Angela Rogers

    Angela Rogers

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use genetics and genomics methodologies to identify novel ARDS pathobiology; we hope that this will enable identification of novel biomarkers, phenotypes, and treatments for the disease. We are building a plasma biobank of critically ill patients at Stanford, with a particular focus on metabolic changes in critical illness.

  • Nidhi Rohatgi, MD MS

    Nidhi Rohatgi, MD MS

    Clinical Professor, Medicine
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioNidhi Rohatgi, MD, MS, SFHM is a Clinical Professor of Medicine and Section Chief for Surgical Co-management (Neurosurgery, Orthopedic surgery, and ENT) in the Division of Hospital Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. She primarily manages medical co-morbidities and strives to prevent medical complications in post-surgical patients in the hospital setting. She has led several quality improvement and clinical research studies and is passionate about finding innovative, cost-efficient and sustaining solutions in healthcare. She serves as an investigator in NIH and industry sponsored clinical trials and serves as the Director of Clinical Research (Palo Alto) in the Division of Hospital Medicine at Stanford University. She is an invited speaker at national and international meetings and serves on several national committees. She is the recipient of local, national, and international awards for her work as a clinician, educator, and researcher. She is a strong advocate for patient experience and serves as the Medical Director for the Clinical Advice Services at Stanford Health Care.

  • Rajat Rohatgi

    Rajat Rohatgi

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry and of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Intereststhe overall goal of my laboratory is to uncover new regulatory mechanisms in signaling systems, to understand how these mechanisms are damaged in disease states, and to devise new strategies to repair their function.

  • Dana Nirel Romalis

    Dana Nirel Romalis

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDana Romalis has been a board certified Family Medicine physician since 2004. She enjoys taking care of families throughout all phases of life. Special interests include teaching, collaborative care, preventative medicine, behavioral change, and reproductive and adolescent health. Since 2017, she has been a primary care provider at the Life Connections Health Center in San Jose, caring for Cisco employees and their families.

    She was born and raised in Vancouver, Canada, where she also attended medical school at the University of British Columbia. As an undergraduate at Brandeis University, she double majored in Neuroscience and Psychology, and was captain of the women’s varsity diving team. She did her residency at Montefiore Medical Center’s Residency Program of Social Medicine in the Bronx, NY.

    Prior to joining Stanford’s primary care division in 2017, she worked for 10 years as a physician at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center on their interdisciplinary Valley Homeless Healthcare Program. She is committed to comprehensive and compassionate care for all.

    In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her husband and 2 teenagers, reading, hiking, biking, and volunteering in her community.

  • Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    George D. Smith Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine and Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)
    On Partial Leave from 07/01/2022 To 12/31/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Interests
    Immunetolerance: Mechanisms underlying T-cell tolerance, induction of T-cell anergy and regulatory T cells; Immunomodulation: mAbs, proteins and low molecular weight compounds which can modulate T-cell activation; Primary immunodeficiencies: Characterization of molecular and immunological defects; Gene therapy: Gene transduction of hematopoietic cells for gene therapy in primary immunodeficiencies and metabolic diseases; Hematopoiesis: Mechanisms underlying growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells; Transplantation: Immune reconstitution and T-cell tolerance after allogenic stem cell transplantation; Cytokines/Cytokine receptors: Role in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses

    Clinical Interests
    Primary Immunodeficiencies
    Monogenic Autoimmune Disorders
    Allogenic Bone Marrow Transplantation
    Gene Therapy Clinical Trials
    Cell Therapy Clinical Trials
    Clinical Trials in Autoimmune Diseases and Organ Transplantation
    Clinical Trials in Hemoglobinopathies

  • Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Lisa Goldman Rosas

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    BioLisa Goldman Rosas, PhD MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford School of Medicine. An epidemiologist by training, Dr. Goldman Rosas’ research focuses on addressing disparities in chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, depression, and cancer among racial/ethnic minority families. This research features rigorous quantitative and qualitative methodologies, participatory qualitative approaches, and shared leadership with patient and community partners. She is passionate about integrating patients, caregivers, community organizations, and other key stakeholders in the research process in order to affect the greatest improvements in health and well-being. As a reflection of this passion, Dr. Goldman Rosas serves as the Faculty Director for the School of Medicine Office of Community Engagement, Co-Director of Community-Engaged Research for the Office of Cancer Health Equity, and Director of the Outreach, Recruitment and Engagement Core for the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. In these roles, she supports other faculty and patient and community partners to develop sustainable and meaningful partnerships to support transformative research. In addition to research, she teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels and has a special focus on increasing diversity in biomedical research.

  • Glenn Rosen

    Glenn Rosen

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory examines apoptotic and cell signaling pathways in cancer and lung disease. We are studying signaling pathways that regulate oxidative stress responses and cancer cell growth. Part of these studies focus on analysis of non-canonical transcription regulatory functions of the TERC and Tert components of telomerase in lung disease and cancer.

  • Elsie Gyang Ross

    Elsie Gyang Ross

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Vascular Surgery) and of Medicine (BMIR)

    BioDr. Ross is a vascular surgeon and research scientist. She graduated from Stanford University School of Medicine in 2011 and completed her vascular surgery 0+5 residency at Stanford University School of Medicine in 2018. During her residency, she completed a two-year post-doctoral fellowship in biomedical informatics. Her current research focuses on using machine learning and electronic health records for early disease identification, precision medicine, and evaluating opportunities to engage in patient education beyond the clinic.

  • Mohana Roy, MD

    Mohana Roy, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Roy is a medical oncologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology. She has expertise in Lung and Thoracic cancers, but with a broad clinical interest in hematology and oncology.

    Dr. Roy became an oncologist because of her passion for patient care. She is committed to being a clinician and is focused on improving the patient experience -- from the moment a patient checks in, to how information about their care is conveyed, and how the complex process of getting cancer care can be made a bit more seamless.

    Her research interests include access to clinical trials, quality improvement and improving care delivery. In that effort, she has published on work regarding patient reported outcomes (PROs) and their use to help clinical quality efforts- including in the context of a clinical trial with an electronic PRO portal, through distress screening with the Stanford Medicine Cancer Center, and in improving access to such screening and care for patient with limited English proficiency. She is the recipient of both a clinical innovation award through Stanford and an American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Merit award.

    She is the Associate Medical Director for Quality at Stanford Cancer Center from 2022.

    Dr. Roy received her medical degree from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and then completed residency training at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. She then completed fellowship training in Hematology and Oncology at Stanford. She was chief fellow for her graduating year during fellowship as well.

  • Daniel Rubin

    Daniel Rubin

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford), of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research) and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interest is imaging informatics--ways computers can work with images to leverage their rich information content and to help physicians use images to guide personalized care. Work in our lab thus lies at the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science.

  • Peter Rudd, MD

    Peter Rudd, MD

    Professor of Medicine (General Internal Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsQuality improvement efforts seek to make medical care the “best it can be” rather than merely “good enough” to avoid censure. Focus on improving the average performance usually produces more net benefit than eliminating outliers, often by simplification, standardization, and specification. We have worked with electronic medication monitors, clinical databases, and computerized order entry systems for better clinical outcomes and trained clinicians for professionalism and accountability.

  • Stephen Ruoss

    Stephen Ruoss

    Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have an active collaborative project examining basic and clinical aspects of non-tuberculous mycobacterial lung infection in non-immune compromised adults. Studies have examined possible cellular immune mechanisms for increased susceptibility to these infections, and are also investigating aspects of optimal diagnosis and treatment. In addition, a clinical and translational research program is investigating the causes and genetic factors underlying the evolution of bronchiectasis.