School of Medicine


Showing 1-35 of 35 Results

  • Jennifer Anne Rabbitts

    Jennifer Anne Rabbitts

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative & Pain Medicine (Pediatric Anesthesia) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    BioJennifer Rabbitts, MD is Professor and Chief of Pediatric Pain Management at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Rabbitts directs an NIH-funded research laboratory focused on improving long-term pain and health outcomes in children and adolescents undergoing surgery. Her research is devoted to understanding and preventing chronic postsurgical pain, a disabling condition affecting 20% youth undergoing major surgery. Her current research studies investigate the role of biopsychosocial mechanisms including child psychosocial factors, parental/family factors, and psychophysical processes underlying acute to chronic pain transition. Current clinical trials focus on testing feasibility and efficacy of psychosocial and complementary and integrative interventions to improve acute postsurgical pain and prevent transition to chronic pain.

    Dr Rabbitts is passionate about mentoring, serving as mentor for the Women's Empowerment and Leadership Initiative and for the Mission Driven Mentoring Program for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia. She serves as section editor for Psychology, Psychiatry and Brain Neuroscience Section for Pain Medicine, on the editorial boards for Pediatric Anesthesia and Journal of Pain, and actively serves on committees in the United States Association for the Study of Pain.

  • Marlene Rabinovitch

    Marlene Rabinovitch

    Dwight and Vera Dunlevie Professor of Pediatric Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program seeks to identify the cellular and molecular programs regulating vascular and lung development, through the use of cultured cells and tissues and mouse and rat models. We then determine how these programs are perturbed by genetic abnormalities or injurious processes associated with disease, focusing on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a fatal complication in children with heart defects, and a condition of unknown etiology primarily in young women.

  • Nilima Ragavan

    Nilima Ragavan

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    BioDr Nilima Ragavan is an experienced clinician who has expertise in the care of newborns ranging from critically ill to well babies. She is passionate about education and is the director of the Stanford pediatric resident rotation in the neonatal intensive care unit. She has led several multi disciplinary teams to India, and has organized and conducted international neonatal and perinatal conferences. She is a member of the palliative care team and serves as a mentor to junior faculty. She is the medical director of the Packard Special Care nursery at Sequoia, and also attends in the NICU at Stanford.

  • Sneha Ramakrishna

    Sneha Ramakrishna

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    BioSneha Ramakrishna obtained her B. A. from the University of Chicago and her M.D. from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University. In medical school, through the Howard Hughes Medical Research Scholar Award, she joined Dr. Crystal Mackall’s laboratory, where she designed and developed various GD2 CAR-Ts and tested them in preclinical models. During her residency training in Pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, she cared for some of the first patients treated with CD19 CAR T cells, learning the power of this therapy first-hand. During her fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at the Johns Hopkins/National Cancer Institute combined program, she worked with Dr. Terry Fry. She evaluated the mechanism of CD22 CAR T cell relapse in patients by developing an antigen escape model and establishing a deeper understanding of the effects of antigen density on CAR-T phenotype, expansion, and persistence (Fry…Ramakrishna…Mackall Nat Med, 2018; Ramakrishna, et al., Clinical Cancer Research, 2019). Since arriving at Stanford, Dr. Ramakrishna leads an interdisciplinary team that designs, develops, and successfully implements a robust correlative science platform for our novel CAR-T therapies. Analyzing patient samples from our first-in-human GD2 CAR-T trial (NCT04196413) treating a universally fatal cancer, diffuse midline glioma (DMG), we identified that intracerebroventricular CAR-T administration correlates with enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokines and reduced immunosuppressive cell populations in cerebrospinal fluid as compared to intravenous CAR-T administration (Majzner*, Ramakrishna*, et al., Nature 2022 *co-first authors). Her research program evaluates unique sets of patient samples using novel single-cell immune profiling to identify the drivers of CAR-T success or failure. Building on these findings, her team assesses approaches to enhance CAR-T efficacy and translate these findings to the clinic.

    Clinically, Dr. Ramakrishna cares for children with solid tumors and treats hematologic, solid, and brain tumor pediatric patients with CAR T cell therapies in the Cancer Cellular Therapies program.

  • Anoop Rao

    Anoop Rao

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWearable senors, unobtrusive vital sign monitoring, natural language processing/text mining

  • Rameshwar (Ram) Rao MD PhD

    Rameshwar (Ram) Rao MD PhD

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioMy scientific training spans over a decade of published research in the fields of vascularized bone tissue engineering, biomineralization, gene therapy, and spectral ultrasound. I earned my BS from UC Davis and MS/PhD in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan. I have aimed to form highly collaborative and multidisciplinary research groups at each level of training. This work has resulted in 21 publications, award-winning manuscripts, and multiple national conference research awards. My successful research career began during my undergraduate studies where my work in Prof. Kent Leach’s lab resulted in 3 publications and the Department of Biomedical Engineering Outstanding Undergraduate Research Award. My graduate thesis under the guidance of Prof. Jan Stegemann resulted in 12 publications (7 as first author) in high quality, peer-reviewed journals in the fields of engineering and biotechnology. My graduate studies were funded by an NIH T32 Training grant and the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. My graduate work culminated in the 2013 Outstanding PhD Research Award from the Society for Biomaterials (SFB) and the 2013 Outstanding Student Award from the Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Society (TERMIS). Recognizing the gap in translation of bioengineering research into clinical practice, I opted to pursue an MD at the University of Michigan to become the physician-scientist that identifies clinical problems, engineers the solution, and delivers it back to the patient to advance treatments and improve survival outcomes. My success continued through medical school with 4 clinical research manuscripts and Graduation with Distinction in Research, awarded to 10% of the class.

    In the next phase of my training, I will complete my fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at Stanford through the Accelerated Research Pathway by the American Board of Pediatrics. Prof. Sarah Heilshorn, Associate Chair of Materials Science at Stanford, will be my primary research and career development mentor. Together, we have designed an innovative approach targeting the extracellular matrix to improve survival outcomes in pediatric osteosarcoma.

  • Lindsey Rasmussen

    Lindsey Rasmussen

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests reside in the field of Neurocritical Care Medicine. My research focus has included inflammation following traumatic brain injury, outcome prediction after cardiac arrest, and neuro-monitoring in the pediatric intensive care setting. These interests are integrated clinically to focus on the merging of specialized neurologic monitoring and care with prognostic efforts in critically ill patients.

  • Caroline E. Rassbach

    Caroline E. Rassbach

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics
    Clinical Professor, Emergency Medicine
    Clinical Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMedical education including learner assessment, program development and mentoring and coaching in medicine.

  • Sushma Reddy

    Sushma Reddy

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory's expertise in cardiovascular phenotyping has led to the development of mouse models of congenital heart disease that recapitulate abnormal loading conditions on the heart. We have used these models to advance our understanding of the mechanisms of right heart failure in children and adults with congenital heart disease with the long term goal of identifying noninvasive diagnostic tools to better assess right ventricular health and to develop right ventricle specific therapeutics.

  • David Rehkopf

    David Rehkopf

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Sociology, of Pediatrics and of Health Policy
    On Leave from 07/01/2024 To 08/31/2024

    BioI am a social epidemiologist and serve as an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health and in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. I joined the faculty at Stanford School of Medicine in 2011.

    I am Director of the Stanford Center for Population Health Sciences. In this position, I am committed to making high-value data resources available to researchers across disciplines in order to better enable them to answer their most pressing clinical and population health questions.

    My own research is focused on understanding the health implications of the myriad decisions that are made by corporations and governments every day - decisions that profoundly shape the social and economic worlds in which we live and work. While these changes are often invisible to us on a daily basis, these seemingly minor actions and decisions form structural nudges that can create better or worse health at a population level. My work demonstrates the health implications of corporate and governmental decisions that can give the public and policy makers evidence to support new strategies for promoting health and well-being. In all of his work, I have a focus on the implications of these exposures for health inequalities.

    Since often policy and programmatic changes can take decades to influence health, my work also includes more basic research in understanding biological signals that may act as early warning signs of systemic disease, in particular accelerated aging. I examine how social and economic policy changes influence a range of early markers of disease and aging, with a particular recent focus on DNA methylation. I am supported by several grants from the National Institute on Aging and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities to develop new more sensitive ways to understand the health implications of social and economic policy changes.

  • David A. Relman

    David A. Relman

    Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
    On Partial Leave from 04/29/2024 To 10/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy investigative program focuses on human-microbe interactions and human microbial ecology, and primarily concerns the ecology of human indigenous microbial communities; a secondary interest concerns the classification of humans with systemic infectious diseases, based on features of genome-wide gene transcript abundance patterns and pther aspects of the host response.

  • William Rhine

    William Rhine

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeonatology, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, nitric oxide therapy, mechanisms of bilirubin toxicity and brain injury, non-invasive biotechnologies to study cellular and organ metabolism.

  • Tawna L. Roberts, OD, PhD

    Tawna L. Roberts, OD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Ophthalmology (Pediatric) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research efforts are funded by grants from the National Eye Institute, Department of Defense, and various foundations to study vision development in infants and young children as well as binocular vision disorders in adolescents and adults with concussions. Our focus is to identify underlying mechanisms that will inform clinical treatment approaches and ultimately leading to the prevention of strabismus, amblyopia, and binocular vision disorders.

  • Terry Robinson

    Terry Robinson

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Pulmonary) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests focus on detection of early and progressive Cystic fibrosis (CF) structural lung disease by utilizing chest CT imaging and CT post-processing methodology. Current research efforts involve utilization of low dose infant & children CT imaging protocols and quantitative airway and air trapping algorithms to evaluate early and progressive CF disease.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Professor of Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Eunice Rodriguez

    Eunice Rodriguez

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent program of teaching and research integrates: 1) health disparities and social epidemiology, within the broader area of public health, and 2) program evaluation, as a synthesis of theory and methods applied to the evaluation of health and social programs.

  • Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    Maria Grazia Roncarolo

    George D. Smith Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Interests
    Immunetolerance: Mechanisms underlying T-cell tolerance, induction of T-cell anergy and regulatory T cells; Immunomodulation: mAbs, proteins and low molecular weight compounds which can modulate T-cell activation; Primary immunodeficiencies: Characterization of molecular and immunological defects; Gene therapy: Gene transduction of hematopoietic cells for gene therapy in primary immunodeficiencies and metabolic diseases; Hematopoiesis: Mechanisms underlying growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells; Transplantation: Immune reconstitution and T-cell tolerance after allogenic stem cell transplantation; Cytokines/Cytokine receptors: Role in regulation of immune and inflammatory responses

    Clinical Interests
    Primary Immunodeficiencies
    Monogenic Autoimmune Disorders
    Allogenic Bone Marrow Transplantation
    Gene Therapy Clinical Trials
    Cell Therapy Clinical Trials
    Clinical Trials in Autoimmune Diseases and Organ Transplantation
    Clinical Trials in Hemoglobinopathies

  • Michael J Rosen, MD, MSCI

    Michael J Rosen, MD, MSCI

    Stanford University Endowed Professor for Pediatric IBD and Celiac Disease

    BioI am a pediatric gastroenterologist and physician scientist, who has been devoted to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) research since beginning medical training over 20 years ago. I am also Director of the Stanford Center for Pediatric IBD and Celiac Disease. I have expertise crossing mucosal immunology and epithelial biology, formal training and experience in clinical and translational investigation with human biospecimens, and direct insight regarding the important clinical challenges caring for children with complicated IBD. My translational research program focuses on how the immune system regulates epithelial function in chronic intestinal inflammation as it relates to IBD. My clinical research program has focused on optimization of anti-TNF therapy in pediatric IBD, and in particular acute severe ulcerative colitis (ASUC). My laboratory has demonstrated a protective role for IL33, a cytokine that induces type 2 cytokines from T cells an innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), in acute oxazolone colitis through preservation of epithelial goblet cells and barrier function. In line with this finding, we have also shown in a large prospective patient cohort that mucosal expression of type 2 and type 17 immune response genes distinguishes ulcerative colitis (UC) from colon-only Crohn’s disease, and that type 2 gene expression is associated with superior clinical outcome in pediatric UC. We have now developed an organoid-immune cell in vitro culture system to demonstrate the ILC2-dependent mechanism through which IL33 induces goblet cell differentiation in the intestinal epithelium. I led the multicenter study Anti-TNF for Refractory Colitis in Hospitalized Children (ARCH) Study, which aims to establish determinants of anti-TNF response in pediatric ASUC and currently Co-Chair the Crohn's & Colitis Foundations Cohort for Pediatric Translational and Clinical Research in IBD (CAPTURE IBD) and PRO-KIIDS Pediatric IBD clinical research network.

  • David Rosenthal

    David Rosenthal

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include the study of Heart Failure, Cardiomyopathy and ventricular dysfunction in children, from a clinical perspective. Investigations include clinical trials of medications, cardiac resynchronization, and mechanical circulatory support.

  • Stephen J. Roth

    Stephen J. Roth

    Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology)
    On Partial Leave from 06/17/2024 To 07/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRandomized Therapeutic Trials in Pediatric Heart Disease, NIH/U01 GrantNo. HL68285 2001-2006.
    Heparin and the Reduction of Thrombosis (HART) Study. Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.
    A Pilot Trial fo B-type Natriuretic Peptide for Promotion of Urine Output in Diuretic-Resistant Infants Following Cardiovascular Surgery.Pediatric Health Research Fund Award, Stanford Univ Sch of Medicine, 2005-2006.

  • Christopher John Russell

    Christopher John Russell

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Hospital Medicine)

    BioDr. Russell is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine and a board-certified academic pediatric hospitalist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. His clinical responsibilities include caring for children hospitalized for a variety of illnesses. His research focuses on developing evidence-based care for hospitalized children with medical complexity, including acute respiratory infections (such as pneumonia and bacterial tracheitis). His research efforts have been recognized through receipt of the University of Southern California’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute’s KL2 Mentored Research Career Development Award (2014-16), the Academic Pediatric Association’s Young Investigator Award (2015-16), the NIH Loan Repayment Program (2017-2021) and a large grant from the Gerber Foundation (2020-2022). In August 2021, he received a five-year R01 award from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to study bacterial respiratory infections in children with tracheostomy. Outside of his clinical and research responsibilities, Dr. Russell focuses on research mentorship of medical students, pediatric residents, and pediatric hospital medicine fellows as well as improving representation of underrepresented minorities in medicine throughout the continuum of physician training. Dr. Russell is the chair of the Academic Pediatric Association’s Membership, Diversity, and Inclusion Committee and is on the Executive Committee for the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings research network. Dr. Russell is active in the AAP and currently serves as an Associate Editor for the journal Hospital Pediatrics.