School of Medicine


Showing 51-100 of 121 Results

  • Christopher Sharp, MD

    Christopher Sharp, MD

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health
    Clinical Professor, Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Informatics
    Clinical Education
    Teaching Physical Examination
    Quality Improvement
    Preventive Medicine

  • Jonathan Shaw

    Jonathan Shaw

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Obstetrics & Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary care, psycho-social determinants of health & care, maternal-child health

  • Meera Sheffrin

    Meera Sheffrin

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGeriatric education
    Implementation and evaluation of home-based care
    Improving care for older adults with dementia

  • Bansari Sureshchandra Sheth

    Bansari Sureshchandra Sheth

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Sheth is originally from southern California, but has progressively moved up the coast over the last few years, now making the Bay Area her wonderful new home. Board certified in Family Medicine, she had comprehensive training during residency. She has a variety of special interests, including pediatric illnesses, women’s health, diabetes care including lifestyle management, as well as Hepatitis C treatment. She believes in empowering her patients, working together with them as a team. In her free time, Dr. Sheth enjoys yoga, going to plays or musicals, comedy shows, and hiking.

  • Parveen Shiraz, MD

    Parveen Shiraz, MD

    Instructor, Medicine - Blood & Marrow Transplantation

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a physician-scientist in the Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation/Cell Therapy (BMT/CT) at Stanford University. The dearth of effective therapies for refractory leukemias and the curative potential of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) prompted me to pursue a career in HCT. As a BMT clinician, caring for patients suffering from the toxicities of HCT and post-HCT leukemia relapse motivated me to pursue laboratory and translational research in search of less toxic and more effective HCT conditioning strategies. In 2021, I became an instructor in the laboratory of Dr. Judith Shizuru who specializes in CD117 antibody based non-toxic HCT conditioning. We have produced anti-CD117 multi-antigen targeting and NK, macrophage or T cell engaging antibodies to eradicate residual leukemic clones and permit engraftment of normal donor HSCs. Our invitro studies are already showing superiority of the multiantigen targeting NK engaging antibodies and invivo studies of these antibodies in xenograft models of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia are in progress.

  • Judith Shizuru

    Judith Shizuru

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransplantation of defined populations of allogeneic hematopoietic cells. Specifically, the way in which hematopoietic cell grafts alter antigen specific immune responses to allo-, auto- and viral antigens. The cellular and molecular basis of resistance to engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

  • William Shomali

    William Shomali

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Hematology

    BioDr. Shomali is a clinical assistant professor of Hematology at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is board certified in hematology & medical oncology.

    Dr. Shomali specializes in the treatment of blood cancers such as myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic syndromes. He aims to provide compassionate, personalized, and evidence-based care to each patient.

    Dr. Shomali received his medical degree from the University of Jordan, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at MD Anderson Cancer Center where he studied infections in cancer patients and the role of biomarkers in defining tumor fever. He completed his residency training in Internal Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation where he served as a Chief Medical Resident. He then joined Stanford University for his combined Hematology & Oncology fellowship training.

    Dr. Shomali’s research interests include the study of novel agents in myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic syndromes. He developed investigator-initiated clinical trials for patients with eosinophilic neoplasms and advanced myelofibrosis. In addition, he co-authored several papers and book chapters discussing the care of patients with cancer. His work has been presented in national meetings and published in peer reviewed journals including Blood, American Journal of Hematology, British Journal of Hematology, Leukemia & Lymphoma, and Cancer.

    Among his honors, Dr. Shomali received the Cleveland Clinic Excellence in Teaching Award and was named to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society. He has received a Young Investigator Award from the Conquer Cancer Foundation, an NIH Institutional National Research Service Award, and a Stanford Cancer Institute Fellowship Award.

    Dr. Shomali is a member of the American Society of Hematology and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  • Aimee D. Shu

    Aimee D. Shu

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Endocrinology, Gerontology, & Metabolism

    BioI am an endocrinologist with particular interests in reproductive and bone health.

    I enjoy treating patients with menstrual disorders, menopause, fractures, osteoporosis, parathyroid imbalance, and calcium imbalance.

    As a certified menopause practitioner (North American Menopause Society), I help women fine-tune their health at the mid-life transition. Some women transition through menopause with ease, while others experience challenging symptoms like hot flashes, slowed metabolism, and mood changes. This transition period provides a good opportunity to create a "game plan" for preserving future health. It also marks the beginning of natural bone loss, leaving one more susceptible to fragility fractures.

    I provide individualized treatment plans for bone health to men and women of all ages, including for those with specific challenges such as chronic steroid use. As a certified clinical densitometrist (International Society for Clinical Densitometry), I personally review all my patients' bone density scan images. Thus, please bring any non-Stanford bone density scan images to your appointment with me.

    Appointments with me are available on Stanford's main campus (300 Pastuer Drive) and at the Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center (450 Broadway, Redwood City).

  • Takudzwa Shumba

    Takudzwa Shumba

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Takudzwa Shumba is a family medicine clinician-educator with particular interests in global health equity, preventative medicine, women's health, pediatrics and integrative medicine. She was born and raised in Zimbabwe. Prior to beginning medical school at Stanford, she completed a Master's in Public Health at Yale, with a focus in global health. She has been involved in public health projects in Zimbabwe, Hong Kong and mainland China and Kenya. She completed her residency at Stanford Health Care - O'Connor Hospital Family Medicine in San Jose, prior to joining faculty at Stanford Family Medicine. LGBTQQI friendly. After several years as a continuity primary care provider at Stanford Family Medicine, she transitioned to providing quality same day access for acute patient needs.

    She is currently Co-director of the Leadership Education in Advancing Diversity (LEAD) program, Associate Director of the Clinical Summer Internship (CSI), Course Director of the undergraduate seminar “Decolonizing Global Health,” and Co-Director of the "Social and Environmental Determinants of Health" elective. She is a California Health Care Foundation (CHCF) Fellow (2020-2022) and Presidential Leadership Scholar (2022). She previously served as the Primary Care and Population Health (PCPH) Division Global Health faculty lead and PCPH DEI faculty lead.

  • Anjali Sibley MD, MPH

    Anjali Sibley MD, MPH

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Sibley is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at Stanford School of Medicine. She is the Director of the Stanford Medicine Cancer Center in Emeryville and is a board-certified, fellowship-trained hematologist and medical oncologist.

    Her clinical interests include treating solid tumor cancers, lung cancers, blood cancers and benign blood conditions. She is interested in cancer prevention and reducing disparities in hematologic/oncologic care among underserved populations, and successful cancer survivorship programs.

    In addition to responsibilities related to patient care and overseeing the Cancer Center in Emeryville, Dr. Sibley has developed and is leading an innovative cancer survivorship clinic, including an exercise initiative. She also is passionate about advancing clinical trial enrollment for medically underserved populations and she serves on the Cancer Network’s East Bay Health Equity Committee leading lung cancer screening efforts in the East Bay. She is also working on a Stanford Cancer Institute-funded study examining psychosocial factors and cardiac health in Black cancer patients in the East Bay.

    She believes that providing patient care is a true privilege. Dr. Sibley utilizes a patient-centered practice approach that addresses multiple aspects of a patient’s well-being. Her research interests have included chemoprevention of breast cancer and the development of magnetic resonance imaging technology in breast cancer detection and mapping. She has also led community-based efforts to implement low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) as a screening tool for cancer.

    Dr. Sibley’s publications include articles on breast cancer prevention, breast magnetic resonance imaging, and other topics. Her work has appeared in American Journal of Hematology, JAMA, the Breast Journal, Internal Medicine News, and elsewhere. Dr. Sibley was invited to deliver a peer-reviewed presentation on community-based cancer screening and preventive education to the Global Health Council. Dr. Sibley is on the board of directors of the Cancer Support Community SF Bay Area. She has also served as a clinic physician for the Native American Health Center of Oakland, on the Committee on Health Equity of the American Public Health Association, and as chair and vice chair of the Cancer Forum Caucus of the American Public Health Association. She is a member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society of Preventive Oncology, and American Society of Hematology. She has provided volunteer services to the Global Health Council and to the Cancer Patients Aid Association, for whom she conducted a patient screening and education program in Mumbai, India.

  • Surbhi Sidana, MD

    Surbhi Sidana, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Sidana is a hematologist/oncologist who is fellowship trained in advanced hematology with an emphasis on myeloma, amyloidosis, and dysproteinemia disorders. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation & Cellular Therapy, at Stanford University School of Medicine. She leads the Myeloma Cellular Immunotherapy program at Stanford.

    Her areas of expertise include transplantation and novel cellular immunotherapies such as CAR-T-cell therapy for patients with multiple myeloma. For each patient, Dr. Sidana develops a personalized care plan designed to optimize outcomes and quality of life.

    Dr. Sidana conducts extensive research. Currently, she is conducting clinical trials of CAR-T therapy and bispecific T-cell engagers for treatment of patients with myeloma. She is studying patients’ access to CAR-T cell therapy, the financial burden of the treatment, and its impact on patients’ quality of life and cognitive function.

    Dr Sidana has received a grant from the Stanford Medicine Cancer Institute and NIH funding through the Stanford KL2 program to study adverse events of CAR-T therapy on patients and monitoring of patients undergoing CAR-T therapy using wearable devices.

    In the past, Dr. Sidana received Conquer Cancer Foundation Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Clinical Oncology for her research on the impact of clinical trial participation on patients with multiple myeloma and lymphoma. She has also received grants from the Amyloidosis Foundation and International Waldenstrom’s Macrogloulinemia Foundation to understand AL amyloidosis, a rare disease caused by buildup of an abnormal protein.

    Dr. Sidana has given presentations at regional and national conferences and her work has been published in high-impact journals.

    Dr. Sidana has been recognized for her work with many honors, including an Outstanding Hematology/Oncology Fellow award and Outstanding Research Fellow award from the Mayo Clinic.

    She is a member of the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, International Myeloma Society, International Society of Amyloidosis, and American Society of Transplantation & Cellular Therapy. Dr. Sidana is often an invited speaker at patient support groups as well as symposia and workshops for her peers.

  • Branimir I. Sikic, M. D.

    Branimir I. Sikic, M. D.

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Interests: cancer pharmacology, mechanisms of resistance to anticancer drugs, regulation and function of MDR1 and tubulin genes, CD47 as a target for activation of anticancer macrophases, Phase I trials of new drugs, gene expression profiling of cancers

  • Julia Fridman Simard

    Julia Fridman Simard

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    BioJulia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology and Obstetrics and Gynecology in Maternal Fetal Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford’s Epidemiology faculty in 2013. Dr. Simard studies outcomes such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases with a focus on systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently her primary research focus has shifted to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease fueled by a K01 career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. This led to collaborations with colleagues at Stanford, throughout the US, and abroad, and a series of projects focused on the diagnosis of preeclampsia and associated risks in pregnant women with systemic lupus. Dr. Simard was awarded a Peter Joseph Pappas Research Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her lab's work examining preeclampsia risk in high-risk populations, and a McCormick Faculty Award from Stanford Medicine to take important steps towards disentangling preeclampsia from lupus nephritis. Dr. Simard is leading an international study of hydroxychloroquine in lupus pregnancy leveraging mixed methods in partnership with qualitative researchers, patients, clinicians, and epidemiologists in Sweden, Canada, and in the United States.

    In addition to these issues of misclassification in reproductive rheumatology questions, Dr. Simard's lab is also interested in how misclassification, missed opportunities, and misdiagnosis contribute to disparities in complex conditions such as systemic lupus. In addition to methodologic issues around misclassification and bias and the largely clinical epidemiology focus of her work, Dr. Simard's work examines social determinants of health and health disparities. Dr. Simard was recently awarded an R01 from NIH (NIAID) to study the role of cognitive and unconscious bias in clinical decision making for female-predominant diseases including lupus.

  • Sundeep Singh

    Sundeep Singh

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioAfter living and training throughout the country, I am excited to be part of the Stanford team. As a result of both my personal experiences and training, I am passionate about ensuring that patients receive appropriate diagnostic testing and treatment options in order to improve people's quality of life. In collaboration with my amazing colleagues, I am confident in the high quality and easily accessible care we are able to provide to patients across northern California.

    While my interest is most in inflammatory bowel disease, I am also interested in the interaction between mental health, incentives, and emerging therapies in gastroenterology.

  • Upinder Singh

    Upinder Singh

    Stanford Medicine Professor of Infectious Disease and Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab elucidates the molecular basis of pathogenesis of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We use genetic and genomic approaches to identify novel virulence determinants and to characterize the global epidemiology of the parasite.

  • Sidhartha Sinha

    Sidhartha Sinha

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThere are two primary and overlapping emphases of my research, both of which are driven and united by needs-based innovation and translational potential:

    (1) Understanding the microenvironment of the inflamed versus normal gut in order to identify better therapeutic targets for people with immune-¬mediated GI disorders. Here, our investigations include understanding the influence and interactions of pharmacologic and dietary interventions on gut microbiome/metabolomic changes and the host immune response. In the context of providing patients with new understanding and solutions for their disease, I have led and advised on the design of both pilot and large clinical trials (including new FDA approved therapies) for anti-inflammatory therapies;

    (2) Applying novel approaches and technologies (including natural language processing, computer vision, and reinforcement learning) to identify and address unmet clinical needs. In this area we have ongoing and published efforts in my lab to validate and develop solutions to pressing clinical needs. We have developed/led new drug delivery technologies with a multidisciplinary team that have shown strong potential in ongoing human IBD clinical trials. My lab has utilized both supervised and unsupervised approaches to analyze social media discourse and unstructured data sets for identifying patient needs that are rarely addressed in clinical settings. We have gained insights into patient perceptions around preventative health interventions, such as health screening and diet, including the dearth of evidence-based dietary recommendations to treat IBD (despite strong patient desire for solutions in this domain).

  • Tammy Lisa Sirich

    Tammy Lisa Sirich

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI conduct translational research focused on uremia and dialysis. I use mass spectrometry to conduct studies testing ways to reduce levels of solutes and examining the contribution of uremic solutes to illness.

  • Kelley M. Skeff, MD, PhD

    Kelley M. Skeff, MD, PhD

    George DeForest Barnett Professor of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment and evaluation of improved teaching methods; assessment of teacher's attitudes toward their teaching role; study of clinical teaching; evaluation of alternative methods of learning in clinical clerkships (e.g. computer assisted instruction, video tape review, etc.).

  • Peter Michael Sklarin

    Peter Michael Sklarin

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Sklarin practices endocrinology at Menlo Medical Clinic. He is a graduate of Harvard College, where he majored in biology. He attended medical school at the University of California, San Francisco, completed his internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and completed his endocrinology fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco.

    Dr. Sklarin is board certified in Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism and treats patients with a wide variety of endocrine disorders. He has special expertise in thyroid ultrasound and ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration and directs the Menlo Clinic bone density center.

    In his free time Dr. Sklarin enjoys spending time with his family, playing tennis, running, biking, swimming, and doing triathlons.

  • Grant M. Smith, MD

    Grant M. Smith, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Grant Smith is a palliative care physician and Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Stanford School of Medicine. He is the medical director of the Stanford Palliative Care Center of Excellence (PCCOE) Community Partnerships Team, and he is the lead for quality improvement in advance care planning in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. Dr. Smith graduated with a Bachelor of Science in psychology from Duke University. He received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School. He completed residency in internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco with a focus in primary care, followed by a chief resident year at the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. He subsequently completed his palliative care fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco. As part of the Stanford faculty, he is an attending on the palliative care inpatient service and as a provider in the outpatient palliative care clinic in Palo Alto.

  • Melody Smith, MD, MS

    Melody Smith, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Smith is a board-certified, fellowship-trained medical oncologist and hematologist. She is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Blood & Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy.

    She is also a physician-scientist who conducts extensive research. As a medical student, she completed a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the Clinical Research Training (now, the Medical Research Scholars) Program. Subsequently, following her clinical fellowship, she was a post-doctoral researcher at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. The research in her lab focuses on investigations of the biology of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells to improve the efficacy and safety of this therapy (1) by investigating donor (Nature Medicine, 2017) and off-the-shelf CAR T cells in mouse models and (2) by assessing mechanisms for the impact of the intestinal microbiome on CAR T cell response (Nature Medicine, 2022).

    Dr. Smith presents the findings of her research at regional, national, and international conferences. Further, she has co-authored articles on topics within the field of cancer immunology, including cancer immunotherapy, stem cell transplantation, and CAR T cell therapy. Her work has appeared in journals, among others Nature, Nature Immunology, Nature Medicine, Blood, and Transplantation and Cellular Therapy. She serves a peer reviewer for publications in journals, such as NEJM Evidence, Science Advances, Blood, Cancer Cell, and Molecular Therapy. She also has contributed to chapters in books, including Pocket Oncology, Current Concepts and Controversies in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, and Advanced Concepts in Human Immunology: Prospects for Disease Control.

    She has earned numerous honors; the American Society of Hematology (ASH), the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and several other professional organizations have recognized her achievements as a clinician, researcher, and scholar.

    Dr. Smith is a member of the ASH Committee on Emerging Gene and Cell Therapies and the ASH Committee on Diversity, Equity & Inclusion. Additionally, she serves on committees within the institution and professional organizations focused on promoting diversity among hematology and cell therapy specialists.

  • Sulaiman Somani

    Sulaiman Somani

    Clinical Scholar, Medicine
    Resident in Med/Hospital Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSulaiman Somani is passionate about harnessing the power of cardiovascular signals (e.g., electrocardiograms) and large clinical data (e.g., unstructured like clinical notes) with artificial intelligence to create digital health tools to explain important research questions in and develop digital health tools for prevalent problems in Preventive Cardiology and Cardiac Electrophysiology, particularly around atrial fibrillation.

  • Irene Sonu

    Irene Sonu

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioI am passionate about gut health and strive to provide the best care to my patients. I specialize in complex motility disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. My areas of clinical expertise include achalasia, dysphagia, eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastroparesis, functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, and pelvic floor dysfunction. I also see patients in need of fecal microbiota transplant for recurrent C. difficile infection.

  • Allyson Spence

    Allyson Spence

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioAllyson Spence MD, PhD is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Stanford University School of Medicine. She received her MD, PhD in the MSTP program at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, studying basic mechanisms of transcription using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system in the laboratory of Dr. Tony Weil. She went on to an internship and residency at the University of Pennsylvania before returning to Stanford to complete her Oncology fellowship training. She did a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford in the department of Molecular Biology under the auspices of Dr. Margaret Fuller, where she was the recipient of a career award.

    She has transitioned from basic science research to clinical medicine where she sees patients diagnosed with breast cancer. Additionally, she has an appointment at the Palo Alto VA as a staff oncologist where she focuses on women's cancers and women at high risk of developing breast and gynecologic cancers. She is involved in several translational research projects at the VA, as well as being involved in clinical trials.

  • Sean Paul Spencer, MD,PhD

    Sean Paul Spencer, MD,PhD

    Instructor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioSean Spencer, MD,PhD is a Gastroenterologist and Physician Scientist at Stanford University working with Justin Sonennburg,PhD to uncover the role of dietary intake on the gut microbiome and mucosal immune system. Sean obtained his medical degree University of Pennsylvania, earning his PhD studying nutritional immunology with Yasmine Belkaid,PhD at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), after which he moved to Boston for residency training at Massachusetts General Hospital and completed his Gastroenterology training at Stanford University. Sean’s career goal is to study mechanisms by which dietary intake influences our microbiome and immune system to better understand and treat gastrointestinal disease.

  • Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Edda Spiekerkoetter

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPulmonary Arterial Hypertension
    Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling
    Modulation of BMPR, ENG, ACVRL1 (ALK1), SMAD signaling
    Structural and molecular programs governing right ventricular adaptation and failure
    Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia
    Pulmonary Arteriovenous malformations
    Computational Drug Prediction and Repurposing
    Deep Tissue Confocal Imaging

  • Joshua M. Spin

    Joshua M. Spin

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Spin began his research career studying the structural biology of low density lipoprotein, and has been augmenting his skills with intensive training in molecular biology techniques, particularly those involving high-throughput genetic expression profiling. He is especially interested in vascular smooth muscle cells, and the role of smooth muscle differentiation and phenotypic switching in development and vascular disease. His latest work has focused on the biology of aortic aneurysms.

  • Sandy Srinivas

    Sandy Srinivas

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical interests: general oncology, genito-urinary malignancy Research interests: conducting clinical trials in advanced prostate cancer, bladder cancer and renal cell carcinoma

  • Malathi Srinivasan

    Malathi Srinivasan

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Srinivasan is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at Stanford University, Associate Director at the Stanford Center for Asian Healthcare Research and Education (Stanford CARE), Director of the Stanford CARE Scholars research program, Director of the Stanford Implementation Sciences Fellowship, Fellow at the Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health (CIGH), Board Member for the Stanford Health Professions Education and Scholars (SHaPES, formerly CTSS), and member of the Stanford Teaching and Mentoring Academy (TMA). She is co-Director of the One Health Teaching Scholars Faculty Development Program, an international program focusing on faculty development for health professions education around the world. She is a contributor to CBS-KPIX “Medical Mondays”. Dr. Srinivasan brings her skills as an educator, physician, health services researcher, and entrepreneur to considering how scalable technologies can improve health care. Her work in Virtual Health/telemedicine and new patient engagement models has been published in the NEJM Catalyst – a leading healthcare innovation journal.

    Previously, Dr. Srinivasan was a Master Clinical Educator and Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine. She was the Senior Associate Editor and Editorial Fellowship Director for the Journal of General Internal Medicine, and was the Kimitaka Kaga Visiting Professor at the University of Tokyo at the International Research Center for Medical Education. At UC Davis, Dr. Srinivasan was the Director of Practice Based Learning and Improvement and Medical Director of the Clinical Performance Examination for a decade. She is former President of the California-Hawaii Society of General Internal Medicine, and ex-officio National Council Member for SGIM. She was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar and US Health and Human Service Public Policy Fellow. Dr. Srinivasan has been awarded the California SGIM Educator of the Year Award, Mentor of the Year (California American College of Physicians), and Faculty of the Year (Stanford CARE), and was recognized with the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Education (UC Davis). Her research has focused on two themes. Fist, improving physician competency around clinical decision-making, through Virtual Health, technology-aided education and reflective practice. Second, addressing health disparities for vulnerable populations. She also pursues her interests in the Medical Humanities on the Executive Board of The Pegasus Physician Writers Program at Stanford and as Director of the Medicine, Movement and Dance program within Stanford's medical humanities program, Medicine and the Muse.

  • Randall Stafford

    Randall Stafford

    Professor of Medicine (Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs Director of the SPRC Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, my work focuses on cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention, the adoption of new technology and practices, and patterns of physician practice, particularly medication prescribing. Specific interests include measuring and improving the quality of outpatient care, disparities in health care by race, gender, age and socioeconomic status, and interventions to improve prevention outcomes.

  • Natasha Z. Rabinowitz Steele

    Natasha Z. Rabinowitz Steele

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    BioInternship & Residency Stanford University School of Medicine
    MD, University of Washington
    MPH, The George Washington University
    BA, Mount Holyoke College