School of Medicine


Showing 1-25 of 25 Results

  • Alyce Sophia Adams

    Alyce Sophia Adams

    Stanford Medicine Innovation Professor and Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Health Policy and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    BioDr. Adams is the inaugural Stanford Medicine Innovation Professor and Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Medicine (Primary Care and Outcomes Research), as well as Associate Director for Health Equity and Community Engagement in the Stanford Cancer Institute. Focusing on racial and socioeconomic disparities in chronic disease treatment outcomes, Dr. Adams' interdisciplinary research seeks to evaluate the impact of changes in drug coverage policy on access to essential medications, understand the drivers of disparities in treatment adherence among insured populations, and test strategies for maximizing the benefits of treatment outcomes while minimizing harms through informed decision-making. Prior to joining Stanford School of Medicine, Dr. Adams was Associate Director for Health Care Delivery and Policy and a Research Scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, as well as a Professor at the Bernard J. Tyson Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine. From 2000 to 2008, she was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Population Medicine (formerly Ambulatory Care and Prevention) at Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health care. She received her PhD in Health Policy and an MPP in Social Policy from Harvard University. She is Vice Chair of the Board of Directors for AcademyHealth and a former recipient of the John M. Eisenberg Excellence in Mentoring Award from Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and an invited lecturer on racial disparities in health care in the 2014/2015 National Institute of Mental Health Director’s Innovation Speaker Series.

  • Fernando Alarid-Escudero

    Fernando Alarid-Escudero

    Assistant Professor of Health Policy

    BioFernando Alarid-Escudero, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Health Policy at Stanford University School of Medicine. He obtained his Ph.D. in Health Decision Sciences from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, and was an Assistant Professor at the Center for Research and Teaching in Economics (CIDE) Región Centro, Aguascalientes, Mexico, from 2018 to 2022, prior to coming to Stanford. His research focuses on developing statistical and decision-analytic models to identify optimal prevention, control, and treatment policies to address a wide range of public health problems and develops novel methods to quantify the value of future research. Dr. Alarid-Escudero is part of the Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET), a consortium of NCI-sponsored investigators that includes modeling to improve our understanding of the impact of cancer control interventions (e.g., prevention, screening, and treatment) on population trends in incidence and mortality. Dr. Alarid-Escudero co-founded the Stanford-CIDE Coronavirus Simulation Modeling (SC-COSMO) workgroup (https://www.sc-cosmo.org). He also co-founded the Decision Analysis in R for Technologies in Health (DARTH) workgroup (http://darthworkgroup.com) and the Collaborative Network on Value of Information (ConVOI; https://www.convoi-group.org), international and multi-institutional collaborative efforts where we develop transparent and open-source solutions to implement decision analysis and quantify the value of potential future investigation for health policy analysis. He received a BSc in Biomedical Engineering from the Metropolitan Autonomous University in Iztapalapa (UAM-I), and a Master’s in Economics from CIDE, both in Mexico.

  • Steven Asch

    Steven Asch

    Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Health Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDescribe your current research interest and activities

  • Laurence Baker

    Laurence Baker

    Bing Professor of Human Biology, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Baker's research is in the area of health economics, and focuses on the effects of financial incentives, organizational structures, and government policies on the health care delivery system, health care costs, and health outcomes.

  • Jayanta Bhattacharya

    Jayanta Bhattacharya

    Professor of Medicine, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the constraints that vulnerable populations face in making decisions that affect their health status, as well as the effects of government policies and programs designed to benefit vulnerable populations.

  • Margaret Brandeau

    Margaret Brandeau

    Coleman F. Fung Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Policy

    BioProfessor Brandeau is the Coleman F. Fung Professor in the School of Engineering and a Professor of Medicine (by Courtesy). Her research focuses on the development of applied mathematical and economic models to support health policy decisions. Her recent work has focused on HIV prevention and treatment programs, programs to control the US opioid epidemic, and policies for minimizing the spread of infectious diseases, including COVID-19. She has served as Principal Investigator or Co-PI on a broad range of funded research projects.

    She is a Fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS) and a member of the Omega Rho International Honor Society for Operations Research and Management Science. From INFORMS she has received the President’s Award (recognizing important contributions to the welfare of society), the Pierskalla Prize (in 2001 and 2017, for research excellence in health care management science), the Philip McCord Morse Lectureship Award, and the Award for the Advancement of Women in Operations Research and the Management Sciences. She has also received the Award for Excellence in Application of Pharmacoeconomics and Health Outcomes Research from the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, and a Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation, among other awards. Professor Brandeau earned a BS in Mathematics and an MS in Operations Research from MIT, and a PhD in Engineering-Economic Systems from Stanford.

  • David Chan

    David Chan

    Associate Professor of Health Policy and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioDavid Chan, MD, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Health Policy at the Stanford School of Medicine, an investigator at the Department of Veterans Affairs, and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Drawing on labor and organizational economics, he is interested in studying how information is used in health care, how this affects productivity, and implications for design. He is the recipient of the 2014 NIH Director’s High-Risk, High-Reward Early Independence Award to study the optimal balance of information in health information technology for patient care.

    Dr. Chan received master’s degrees in policy and economics from the London School of Economics and Oxford University, where he studied as a Marshall scholar. He holds a medical degree from UCLA and a PhD in economics from MIT. He trained in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and was an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, prior to coming to Palo Alto, where he currently is a hospitalist at the Department of Veterans Affairs, Palo Alto.

  • Glenn M. Chertow

    Glenn M. Chertow

    Norman S. Coplon/Satellite Healthcare Professor of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health and of Health Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsclinical epidemiology, health services research, decision sciences, clinical trials in acute and chronic kidney disease

  • Alan M. Garber

    Alan M. Garber

    Henry J. Kaiser Jr. Professor and Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTopics in the health economics of aging; health, insurance; optimal screening intervals; cost-effectiveness of, coronary surgery in the elderly; health care financing and delivery, in the United States and Japan; coronary heart disease

  • Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Professor of Health Policy

    BioJeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, PhD, is a Professor of Health Policy and a Core Faculty Member in the Centers for Health Policy and Primary Care and Outcomes Research. His research focuses on complex policy decisions surrounding the prevention and management of increasingly common, chronic diseases and the life course impact of exposure to their risk factors. In the context of both developing and developed countries including the US, India, China, and South Africa, he has examined chronic conditions including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer, tuberculosis, and hepatitis C and on risk factors including smoking, physical activity, obesity, malnutrition, and other diseases themselves. He combines simulation modeling methods and cost-effectiveness analyses with econometric approaches and behavioral economic studies to address these issues. Dr. Goldhaber-Fiebert graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1997, with an A.B. in the History and Literature of America. After working as a software engineer and consultant, he conducted a year-long public health research program in Costa Rica with his wife in 2001. Winner of the Lee B. Lusted Prize for Outstanding Student Research from the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2006 and in 2008, he completed his PhD in Health Policy concentrating in Decision Science at Harvard University in 2008. He was elected as a Trustee of the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2011 and Secretary/Treasurer in 2021.

    Past and current research topics:

    - Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors: Randomized and observational studies in Costa Rica examining the impact of community-based lifestyle interventions and the relationship of gender, risk factors, and care utilization.

    -Cervical cancer: Model-based cost-effectiveness analyses and costing methods studies that examine policy issues relating to cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus vaccination in countries including the United States, Brazil, India, Kenya, Peru, South Africa, Tanzania, and Thailand.

    - Measles, haemophilus influenzae type b, and other childhood infectious diseases: Longitudinal regression analyses of country-level data from middle and upper income countries that examine the link between vaccination, sustained reductions in mortality, and evidence of herd immunity.

    - Patient adherence: Studies in both developing and developed countries of the costs and effectiveness of measures to increase successful adherence. Adherence to cervical cancer screening as well as to disease management programs targeting depression and obesity is examined from both a decision-analytic and a behavioral economics perspective.

    - Simulation modeling methods: Research examining model calibration and validation, the appropriate representation of uncertainty in projected outcomes, the use of models to examine plausible counterfactuals at the biological and epidemiological level, and the reflection of population and spatial heterogeneity.

  • Mary Kane Goldstein

    Mary Kane Goldstein

    Professor of Health Policy and, by courtesy, of Medicine (BMIR)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHealth services research in primary care and geriatrics: developing, implementing, and evaluating methods for clinical quality improvement. Current work includes applying health information technology to quality improvement through clinical decision support (CDS) integrated with electronic health records; encoding clinical knowledge into computable formats in automated knowledge bases; natural language processing of free text in electronic health records; analyzing multiple comorbidities

  • Robert Harrington

    Robert Harrington

    Arthur L. Bloomfield Professor of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Policy

    BioDr. Robert A. Harrington is an interventional cardiologist and the Arthur L. Bloomfield Professor of Medicine and Chairman of the Department of Medicine at Stanford University. Dr. Harrington was previously the Richard Sean Stack, MD Distinguished Professor and the Director of the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) at Duke University. His research interests include evaluating antithrombotic therapies to treat acute ischemic heart disease and to minimize the acute complications of percutaneous coronary procedures, studying the mechanism of disease of the acute coronary syndromes, understanding the issue of risk stratification in the care of patients with acute ischemic coronary syndromes, building local, national and international collaborations for the efficient conduct of innovative clinical research and trying to better understand and improve upon the methodology of clinical research. His research has been extensively funded through NIH, NIA, other peer reviewed agencies and private industry. Committed to training and mentorship, Harrington has served as the principal mentor for more than 20 post-doctoral clinical research fellows focused on cardiovascular research.

    He has authored more than 640 peer-reviewed manuscripts, reviews, book chapters, and editorials. Thomson Reuters lists him as one of the most cited investigators in clinical medicine from 2002-2014. He is a deputy editor of JAMA Cardiology and an editorial board member for the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. He has served as editor of five textbooks and is a senior editor of the 13th and 14th editions of Hurst’s The Heart, one of the leading textbooks of cardiovascular medicine. He has been a member of the NHLBI’s Clinical Trials Study Section and the IOM’s Working Group on Data Sharing. He served as a member of the NIH NCATS Advisory Council Working Group on the IOM CTSA Program. He recently served a second term as a member and the chair of the US Food and Drug Administration Cardiovascular and Renal Drugs Advisory Committee.

    Harrington was recently a member of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Board of Trustees and is currently a member of the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Board of Directors, its Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee, and its President-elect. He will serve as the AHA President beginning in July 2019. He served as the Chair for the AHA’s Scientific Sessions in 2013 and 2014. Harrington is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the Society for Cardiac Angiography and Intervention, the European Society of Cardiology, the American College of Chest Physicians and the American College of Physicians. He is an elected member of the Association of American Physicians and the Association of University Cardiologists. In 2015, he was elected to membership in the National Academy of Medicine/Institute of Medicine. In 2016, he was named a Master of the American College of Cardiology. He was awarded the AHA's Clinical Research Prize in 2017.

    Harrington received his BA in English at the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA. He attended Dartmouth Medical School and received his MD from Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston MA. He did his internship, residency and served as the chief resident in internal medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester MA. He trained in cardiology, interventional cardiology and clinical research (Duke Databank for Cardiovascular Disease) at Duke University Medical Center, Durham NC where he was a faculty member from 1993-2012 before joining the Stanford University faculty in 2012. Interested in innovative learning tools, including novel methods of communicating scientific information, Harrington hosts a regular podcast on theheart.org, The Bob Harrington Show, and can be followed on Twitter @HeartBobH.

  • Mark Hlatky, MD

    Mark Hlatky, MD

    Professor of Health Policy, of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main research work is in "outcomes research", especially examining the field of cardiovascular medicine. Particular areas of interest are the integration of economic and quality of life data into randomized clinical trials, evidence-based medicine, decision models, and cost-effectiveness analysis. I am also interested in the application of novel genetic, biomarker, and imaging tests to assess risk and guide clinical management of coronary artery disease.

  • Michelle Mello

    Michelle Mello

    Professor of Law and of Health Policy (Health Services Research)

    BioMichelle Mello is Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Professor of Health Policy in the Department of Health Policy at Stanford University School of Medicine. She conducts empirical research into issues at the intersection of law, ethics, and health policy. She is the author of more than 200 articles on medical liability, public health law, the public health response to COVID-19, pharmaceuticals and vaccines, biomedical research ethics and governance, health information privacy, and other topics.

    The recipient of a number of awards for her research, Dr. Mello was elected to the National Academy of Medicine at the age of 40. From 2000 to 2014, she was a professor at the Harvard School of Public Health, where she directed the School’s Program in Law and Public Health.

    Dr. Mello teaches courses in torts, public health law, and health policy. She holds a J.D. from the Yale Law School, a Ph.D. in Health Policy and Administration from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, an M.Phil. from Oxford University, where she was a Marshall Scholar, and a B.A. from Stanford University.

  • Arden Morris, MD, MPH, FACS

    Arden Morris, MD, MPH, FACS

    Professor of Surgery (General Surgery) and, by courtesy, of Health Policy
    On Partial Leave from 10/15/2022 To 01/14/2023

    BioArden M. Morris, MD, MPH is Professor of Surgery and Vice-Chair for Research in the Stanford Department of Surgery. She is Director of the S-SPIRE Center, a health services research collaborative to study patient-centered care, clinical optimization, and health care economics. In her own work, Dr. Morris uses quantitative and qualitative research methods to focus on quality of and equity in cancer care. She serves as vice-chair of the Commission on Cancer’s National Accreditation Program for Rectal Cancer Quality Committee, American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons’ representative to the American Joint Commission on Cancer, and Chair of the ACS Cancer Surgery Standards Program Implementation and Integration Committee.

  • Doug Owens

    Doug Owens

    Henry J. Kaiser, Jr. Professor, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research uses decision modeling, cost-effectiveness analysis, and meta-analysis to evaluate clinical and health policy problems. Much of my work involves development of national guidelines for prevention and treatment.

  • Sherri Rose

    Sherri Rose

    Professor of Health Policy

    BioSherri Rose, Ph.D. is a Professor of Health Policy and Co-Director of the Health Policy Data Science Lab at Stanford University. Her research is centered on developing and integrating innovative statistical machine learning approaches to improve human health and health equity. Within health policy, Dr. Rose works on risk adjustment, ethical algorithms in health care, comparative effectiveness research, and health program evaluation. She has published interdisciplinary projects across varied outlets, including Biometrics, Journal of the American Statistical Association, Journal of Health Economics, Health Affairs, and New England Journal of Medicine. In 2011, Dr. Rose coauthored the first book on machine learning for causal inference, with a sequel text released in 2018. She has been Co-Editor-in-Chief of the journal Biostatistics since 2019.

    Her honors include an NIH Director's Pioneer Award, NIH Director's New Innovator Award, the ISPOR Bernie J. O'Brien New Investigator Award, and Mid-Career Awards from the American Statistical Association’s Health Policy Statistics Section, Washington Statistical Society/RTI-International, and Penn-Rutgers Center for Causal Inference. Dr. Rose was named a Fellow of the American Statistical Association in 2020 and she received the 2021 Mortimer Spiegelman Award, which recognizes the statistician under age 40 who has made the most significant contributions to public health statistics. Her research has been featured in The New York Times, USA Today, and The Boston Globe.

    Dr. Rose comes from a low-income background and is committed to increasing justice, equity, diversity and inclusion (JEDI) in the mathematical and health sciences. Included in this work are her roles as founding Co-Director of the Stanford Population Health Summer Research Program: Advancing Health Equity and Diversity (AHEaD) and Co-Chair of Stanford Health Policy’s JEDI Committee. As Chair of the American Statistical Association’s Biometrics Section, she established the Annie T. Randall Innovator Award, which honors Mrs. Randall’s pioneering career in government amid pervasive racism and recognizes early career trailblazers.

  • Joshua Salomon

    Joshua Salomon

    Professor of Health Policy and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioJoshua Salomon is a Professor of Health Policy, a core faculty member in the Center for Health Policy, and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. His research focuses on public health policy and priority-setting, within three main substantive areas: (1) modeling patterns and trends in major causes of global mortality and disease burden; (2) evaluation of health interventions and policies; and (3) measurement and valuation of health outcomes.

    Dr. Salomon is an investigator on projects funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, relating to modeling of infectious and chronic diseases and associated intervention strategies; methods for economic evaluation of public health programs; measurement of the global burden of disease; and assessment of the potential impact and cost effectiveness of new health technologies.

    He is Director of the Prevention Policy Modeling Lab, which is a multi-institution research consortium that conducts health and economic modeling relating to infectious disease. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, Dr. Salomon was Professor of Global Health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

    For more information on the Prevention Policy Modeling Lab visit ppml.stanford.edu.

  • C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    C. Jason Wang, MD, PhD

    Bowei Lee Professor and Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) and of Health Policy

    BioDr. Wang is the Director of Center for Policy, Outcomes and Prevention. Prior to coming to Stanford in 2011, he was a faculty member at Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health. His other professional experiences include working as a management consultant with McKinsey and Company and serving as the project manager for Taiwan's National Health Insurance Reform Task-force. His current interests include: 1) COVID-19 related policies; 2) developing tools for assessing and improving the value of healthcare; 3) facilitating the use of mobile technology in improving quality of care; 4) supporting competency-based medical education curriculum, and 5) engaging in healthcare delivery and payment reforms.