School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 358 Results

  • Gillian Abir

    Gillian Abir

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioGillian Abir graduated from Glasgow University (UK) in 1998. After initially undertaking parts of surgical residency and emergency medicine residency, she completed her anesthesiology residency training in Glasgow and Sheffield (UK). Following this she undertook an obstetric anesthesiology fellowship-equivalent at Stanford University School of Medicine and is currently a Clinical Professor.
    Gillian is the Associate Division Chief and Clinical Director for the Division of Obstetric Anesthesiology and the residency program coordinator for obstetric anesthesiology.
    Gillian has published several manuscripts and book chapters, and is the lead anesthesiologist in the multidisciplinary obstetric simulation team. She is a member of the obstetric disaster preparedness committee and labor and delivery patient safety committee, amongst several other committees. She is the co-chair of the simulation committee and a member of the patient safety and international outreach committees in the Society of Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology.
    Gillian has an interest in global health and is a member of the Board of Directors of Kybele Inc. (www.kybeleworldwide.org) for which she regularly volunteers to teach obstetric anesthesiology in other countries.

  • Rita Agarwal

    Rita Agarwal

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPart of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia Information Network (SPAIN) Steering Committee, looking at shirt and long tern outcomes of various pain management techniques in children.

  • Anuj Aggarwal

    Anuj Aggarwal

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioAnuj Aggarwal, M.D., is both a practicing anesthesiologist and pain specialist. Originally from Southern California, Dr. Aggarwal completed his undergraduate studies in biology with honors at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA. He earned his medical degree from University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine with distinction, completing the Health Professions Education (HPE) Pathway advanced program. He completed his internship at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, CA. He then completed his Anesthesiology residency and Pain Medicine fellowship at Stanford Hospital, joining the faculty in 2018.

    In addition to his research and clinical areas of interest of perioperative pain and orofacial pain, he is the associate program director for the pain management fellowship, theme lead and course director for pharmacology for the medical school, and associate director for Science of Medicine overseeing the teaching of the various organ blocks in the pre-clerkship curriculum. He also is an E4C (Educator for Care) faculty member, teaching clinical skills, clinical reasoning and serving as a mentor to medical students throughout their training. In addition, he is involved within the anesthesia residency education programs through various committees, mentorship of residents, and direct teaching. Formerly, he served as the director of medical student and resident clerkships in pain management and pain theme lead in the pre-clerkship curriculum.

  • Kanwaljeet S. Anand

    Kanwaljeet S. Anand

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Critical Care) and of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Anand is a translational clinical researcher who pioneered research on the endocrine-metabolic stress responses of infants undergoing surgery and developed the first-ever scientific rationale for pain perception in early life. This provided a framework for newer methods of pain assessment, numerous clinical trials of analgesia/anesthesia in newborns, infants and older children. His research focus over the past 30+ years has contributed fundamental knowledge about pediatric pain/stress, long-term effects of pain in early life, management of pain, mechanisms for opioid tolerance and withdrawal. Current projects in his laboratory are focused on developing biomarkers for repetitive pain/stress in critically ill children and the mechanisms underlying sedative/anesthetic neurotoxicity in the immature brain. He designed and directed many randomized clinical trials (RCT), including the largest-ever pediatric analgesia trial studying morphine therapy in ventilated preterm neonates. He has extensive experience in clinical and translational research from participating in collaborative networks funded by NIMH, NINDS, or NICHD, a track-record of excellent collaboration across multiple disciplines, while achieving success with large research teams like the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN). He played a leadership roles in CANDLE (Condition Affecting Neuro-Development & Learning in Early infancy) and other activities of the Urban Child Institute and UT Neuroscience Institute. More recently, he led the NeoOpioid Consortium funded by the European Commission, which collected data from 243 NICUs in 18 European countries.

  • Thomas Anthony ("Tony") Anderson

    Thomas Anthony ("Tony") Anderson

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab's research focuses on two areas:
    1. Focused ultrasound for peripheral nervous system modulation- We are interested in the potential of focused ultrasound to modulate peripheral nerves and improve both acute and chronic pain.
    2. Pediatric perioperative outcomes- Our goals are to understand A) how various perioperative pain management strategies affect outcomes in children who undergo surgery and B) whether disparities in the perioperative pain management of children occur.

  • Kazuo Ando

    Kazuo Ando

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioBorn and raised in Japan, Dr. Ando received an MD-PhD degree from the Aichi Medical University. After anesthesia training, Dr. Ando came to Stanford to pursue clinical and basic research experience. During his postdoctoral fellowship in Dr. Gaudilliere's laboratory, Dr. Ando worked on publication of “A next-generation single-cell technology (mass cytometry) to study the feto-maternal immune system,” a project designed to evaluate the immune response associated with preterm birth. In addition, Dr. Ando performs research in Obstetric Anesthesia, such as respiratory monitoring after cesarean sections and labor satisfaction, to obtain clinical research experience and to understand the key differences in medicine between the United States and Japan.
    After his postdoctoral fellowship, Dr. Ando has maintained his status as a researcher in Dr. Gaudilliere's laboratory, continuing work relating to pregnancy and preterm birth.
    Dr. Ando divides his efforts between laboratory research and the clinic.

  • Timothy Angelotti MD, PhD

    Timothy Angelotti MD, PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research efforts are focused on investigating the pharmacological and physiological interface of the autonomic nervous system with effector organs. Utilizing molecular, cellular, and electrophysiological techniques, we are examining alpha2 adrenergic receptor function in cultured sympathetic neurons. Future research aims will be directed toward understanding neurotransmitter release in general.

  • Martin S. Angst

    Martin S. Angst

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies biological and clinical determinants of human resilience using surgery as an injury model.

  • Nicole E Arkin

    Nicole E Arkin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioI am a critical care anesthesiologist who is devoted to providing excellent clinical care for the sickest patients and their families as well as training our next generation of leaders in critical care medicine.

    The ICU is a unique and fascinating world where I get to combine my love of abnormal physiology, teaching, high-stakes medical care, interdisciplinary collaboration, and deep connections with patients and families. As an intensivist, anesthesiologist, and medical educator, there is no place where this is truer than at Stanford. After completing both medical school and anesthesiology residency at Stanford, I experienced the ravages of the COVID-19 pandemic along with the innovation and collaboration that can result from moments of crisis as an Critical Care Medicine fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. I was drawn to return to Stanford to join our incredible group of intensivists based on the emphasis on interdisciplinary collaboration and professional growth. This rich environment is filled with interesting medicine and brilliant colleagues; it is a place that supports my goals of educating and training future leaders in critical care medicine while taking care of the sickest patients in the hospital and their families.

    While clinical practice is the foundation of what I love about being a physician, I am also interested in leadership development both through education and research. I have a Masters of Science in Teaching and spent two years as a high school chemistry teacher in the South Bronx through Teach for America where I focused on curriculum development. In residency, I became interested in feedback and led a mixed methods research study that identified gender bias in resident feedback during the early years of anesthesiology residency. Currently, I am the Associate Program Director of our Anesthesia Critical Care fellowship and am the Director of the required clerkship for medical students in the ICU. I feel incredibly privileged to work in a place that supports these pursuits and encourages me to be the best physician, colleague, and educator I can be.

  • Naola Austin

    Naola Austin

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioNaola S. Austin M.D., is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Stanford University and the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System. She co-directs the Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management (ACRM) course and teaches a number of simulation courses as faculty with the Center for Immersive and Simulation-based Learning, OB SIM Team, InterCEPT Team, and VA Palo Alto. As a point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) faculty, she teaches neuraxial, transthoracic, lung, gastric, FAST, and other ultrasound techniques. She is also a member of the Stanford Anesthesia Cognitive Aid Program (SACAP), a collaborative group who designs and updates the Stanford Emergency Manual.

    She is originally from New Mexico and received her medical degree at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, NY. After completing residency training in Anesthesiology at the University of Washington, she went on to dual fellowship training in Obstetric Anesthesia and Healthcare Simulation.

    In addition to her work as a Co-Primary Investigator with the Safety Learning Lab, she has published basic science articles on synapse biology, clinical reviews on cervical spine injury in trauma and burns, and Simulation and Communication in Obstetric care. She has received multiple honors including U.S.-E.U. Exchange Scholar Rogers’ Colloquium Speaker, Resident of the Year, Foundation for Anesthesia Education & Research Scholar, and Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society.

    Naola is an avid gardener, leisure cyclist, and very amateur rock climber.