School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 826 Results

  • Oscar J. Abilez

    Oscar J. Abilez

    Senior Scientist, Cardiothoracic Surgery - Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Abilez' interests are aimed at elucidating how various biophysical and biochemical perturbations regulate early cardiovascular development across time and length scales that span several orders of magnitude, using human pluripotent stem cells as a model system.

  • Marwa Abu El Haija

    Marwa Abu El Haija

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    BioI am a pediatric gastroenterologist with clinical and research interest in childhood obesity. I believe that each patient is unique in their disease and background, that is why they deserve to be approached in an individualized way. I aspire to discover what's unknown about the pathophysiologic causes of obesity, and the mechanisms of which treatments work. My clinical and research interests in pediatric obesity found home within Stanford's distinctive position academically, medically and geographically.

  • Monther Abu-Remaileh

    Monther Abu-Remaileh

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the role of the lysosome in metabolic adaptation using subcellular omics approaches, functional genomics and innovative biochemical tools. We apply this knowledge to understand how lysosomal dysfunction leads to human diseases including neurodegeneration, cancer and metabolic syndrome.

  • Peter Acker

    Peter Acker

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research and work focus on optimizing the use of health system data to create intelligent and accurate emergency referral systems to ensure vulnerable populations receive the care they require as efficiently as possible. I am interested in increasing our understanding of currently available health infrastructure in resource limited settings, and pairing that knowledge with technology tools to help identify patient's true needs and match those needs with health system capacity in real-time.

  • Maya Adam

    Maya Adam

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Adam is the Director of Health Media Innovation and a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Stanford School of Medicine. She creates video-based entertainment-education on topics related to maternal child health, nutrition and disease prevention. She has designed and produced online educational content for the Stanford School of Medicine for use in their preclinical programs, continuing medical education programs and global health promotion efforts. She is the Faculty Lead for the Global Child Health Media Initiative and the creator of eight massive open online courses reaching more than a million learners around the world. Adam is principal investigator on two randomized-controlled trials investigating the impact of digital global health education interventions on health-promoting behaviors. Her research is conducted in collaboration with the Heidelberg Institute of Global Health in Heidelberg, Germany. She is a Faculty Fellow at the Center for Innovation in Global Health and the author of Food, Love, Family: A Practical Guide to Child Nutrition.

  • Ananta Addala

    Ananta Addala

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    BioDr. Ananta Addala is a pediatric endocrinologist and physician scientist addressing disparities in pediatric type 1 diabetes management and outcomes. As a physician with a background in pediatric endocrinology, epidemiology, and behavioral health, she aims to build an evidence-based approach to addressing T1D disparities by systematically evaluating youth-, family-, provider-, and system-level barriers to optimal diabetes care in youth from low socioeconomic and racial/ethnic minority groups.

    To date, her publications have demonstrated that the disparities in pediatric T1D by socioeconomic status are worsening in the US, provider bias against public insurance is common, and public insurance mediated interruptions to diabetes technology adversely impact glycemic outcomes. She has also been leading the efforts to improve justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion in research at Stanford University through her leadership at Stanford Pediatrics Advancing Anti-Racism Coalition and as the co-chair of TrialNet's Underrepresented Minorities Outreach Committee.

  • Catherine Aftandilian

    Catherine Aftandilian

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI conduct clinical research on the prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of infectious complications in pediatric patients with leukemia.

  • Nima Aghaeepour

    Nima Aghaeepour

    Associate Professor (Research) of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD), of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Biomedical Data Science

    BioThank you for your interest. Please use the links on the bottom right side of this page to learn more about our laboratory's work.

  • Lusine Aghajanova, M.D., Ph.D.

    Lusine Aghajanova, M.D., Ph.D.

    Clinical Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility

    BioDr. Aghajanova received her medical degree from Yerevan State Medical University in Armenia, followed by residency in obstetrics and gynecology, then completed PhD in Human Implantation at Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, followed with embryology training at Karolinska Institute, with an Internship in Austria.
    She continued her research as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California San Francisco.

    Subsequently, Dr. Aghajanova completed residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas and at UC San Francisco. She proceeded then with subspecialty fellowship training in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at UC San Francisco. She is a respected researcher in the field of endometrial receptivity, implantation and endometriosis.

    Dr. Aghajanova speaks Russian and Armenian and is very well published with over 50 peer-reviewed publications as well as numerous other oral and poster presentations and is a professional peer-reviewer for over 12 journals.

    Dr.Aghajanova enjoys spending time with her husband and children, and traveling.

  • Iram Ahmad, MD, MME

    Iram Ahmad, MD, MME

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    BioDr. Iram Ahmad received her MD from the University of Michigan Medical School. She then completed Otolaryngology residency program at the University of Iowa. At Iowa, she was an NIH- sponsored T32 research resident in the Department of Otolaryngology. During her residency training she also gained expertise in education and graduated with a Master in Medical Education from the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine. After residency, Dr. Ahmad continued at Iowa for her fellowship in Pediatric Otolaryngology.

    Dr. Ahmad is an Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery in the Pediatric Division. Her clinical expertise is in Pediatric Otology and hearing loss. She is focused on children with hearing loss, cochlear implantation, cholesteatoma, and general pediatric Otolaryngology. Her research interests are in children with congenital hearing loss and microstructure changes of the brain.

  • Raag Airan

    Raag Airan

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur goal is to develop and clinically implement new technologies for high-precision and noninvasive intervention upon the nervous system. Every few millimeters of the brain is functionally distinct, and different parts of the brain may have counteracting responses to therapy. To better match our therapies to neuroscience, we develop techniques that allow intervention upon only the right part of the nervous system at the right time, using technologies like focused ultrasound and nanotechnology.

  • Steven R. Alexander, MD

    Steven R. Alexander, MD

    Professor of Pediatrics (Nephrology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDialysis, kidney transplantation, continuous renal replacement therapy in pediatric patients; chronic kidney disease in pediatric patients.

  • Ash A. Alizadeh, MD/PhD

    Ash A. Alizadeh, MD/PhD

    Moghadam Family Professor
    On Partial Leave from 09/01/2022 To 08/31/2023

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on attaining a better understanding of the initiation, maintenance, and progression of tumors, and their response to current therapies toward improving future treatment strategies. In this effort, I employ tools from functional genomics, computational biology, molecular genetics, and mouse models.

    Clinically, I specialize in the care of patients with lymphomas, working on translating our findings in prospective cancer clinical trials.

  • Leina Alrabadi

    Leina Alrabadi

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    BioI enjoy working with a multidisciplinary team to care for patients who have complex medical needs with the aim of giving children a better future. As a clinical researcher, my main focus is on finding improved therapies for autoimmune and cholestatic liver diseases, since an ideal therapy currently does not exist.

  • Russ B. Altman

    Russ B. Altman

    Kenneth Fong Professor and Professor of Bioengineering, of Genetics, of Medicine (General Medical Discipline), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI refer you to my web page for detailed list of interests, projects and publications. In addition to pressing the link here, you can search "Russ Altman" on http://www.google.com/

  • Ruben Alvero, M.D.

    Ruben Alvero, M.D.

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility)

    BioDr. Ruben Alvero is Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Stanford Medical School and is the Division Director of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at the Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital. He is Board Certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology and in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. He is a fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the American College of Surgeons.

    Following undergraduate training at Harvard College (BA, Economics, 1980), Dr. Alvero received his medical degree from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland in 1986. He completed his residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Walter Reed Army Medical Center (1990) and a fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at the National Institutes of Health (NIH, 1995).

    Dr. Alvero was the Division Director for Infertility Services at the National Naval Medical Center (Bethesda) and Walter Reed Army Medical Center and faculty in the NIH-sponsored fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility. Dr. Alvero remained a reserve Colonel in the U.S. Army Medical Corps until 2012 and during 27 years in the Army was mobilized several times for missions around the world, including service in Iraq, Kuwait, Mongolia, Germany and various locations in the United States.

    Dr. Alvero was Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Vice Chair for Education at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and the Director of the Assisted Reproductive Technologies, and founding member of the Center for Surgical Innovation. Dr. Alvero was Residency Program Director in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Colorado. He was subsequently Division and Fellowship Director at Brown University.

    The Council in Residency Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology awarded him its National Faculty Award for Excellence three times. He has been NIH-funded, most recently as part of the Reproductive Medicine Network.

    Dr. Alvero is currently the Vice President of the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology, the national organization of fertility specialists and will take over as President in October 2020.

    Dr. Alvero’s clinical interests include IVF, polycystic ovary syndrome, endometriosis and robotic surgery. Dr. Alvero’s research interests include non-invasive evaluation of embryo quality, cost-effectiveness analysis, and the role of critical thinking in medical education. A fluent Spanish-speaker, Dr. Alvero is also dedicated to improving the health of the Latinx community.

    Dr. Alvero is happiest on the water, whether sailing or singles rowing. He is also constantly attempting to improve his mastery of Latin American cuisine. Most of all, he loves spending time with his family.

  • Cristina Maria Alvira

    Cristina Maria Alvira

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe overall objective of the Alvira Laboratory is to elucidate the mechanisms that promote postnatal lung development and repair, by focusing on three main scientific goals: (i) identification of the signaling pathways that direct the transition between the saccular and alveolar stages of lung development; (ii) exploration of the interplay between postnatal vascular and alveolar development; and (iii) determination of developmentally regulated pathways that mediate lung repair after injury.

  • Manuel R. Amieva

    Manuel R. Amieva

    Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory studies how bacteria colonize our bodies for long periods of time, and how interactions between bacteria and the epithelial surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract and skin may lead to disease. Epithelial surfaces are the first barrier against infection, but they also where our bodies meet and co-evolve with the microbial world.. Several of our studies have focused on the epithelial junctions as a target for bacterial pathogens. The host epithelium uses its epithelial junctions to form a tight but dynamic barrier with an external surface that is inhospitable to microbial attachment, secretes anti-microbial compounds, and has a rapid rate of self-renewal. The balance in the microbe-epithelial relationship results in silent commensalism or symbiosis; an imbalance results in diseases ranging from acute bacterial invasive disease to chronic ulcers or carcinoma.

    Our laboratory has developed novel microscopy applications such as quantitative 3D confocal microscopy, electron microscopy, time-lapse imaging, microinjection and micromanipulation to visualize the interaction of pathogens with epithelial cells in culture and in animal and human tissues. Many of out studies focus on the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, but we have also expanded our investigations to include the intestinal pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica, and the skin pathogen and colonizer Staphylococcus aureus. I believe that elucidating how microbes communicate with and alter our epithelial cells at a molecular level will be important for finding novel therapeutic targets to control mucosal colonization and prevent invasive disease.

    Using this perspective, we have uncovered several novel concepts of how bacteria colonize and breach our epithelial surfaces. For example, we discovered that Helicobacter pylori target the intercellular junctions, and in particular that the virulence factor CagA affects junction assembly and cell polarity. This confers H. pylori the ability to extract nutrients and grow directly on the epithelial surface. We also found that these properties of CagA have consequences for cellular transformation of the epithelium. For instance, we showed that H. pylori affect the activity and state of epithelial stem cells in the stomach by colonizing the epithelial surface deep in the gastric glands. This gland-associated population is essential for pathological inflammation and hyperplasia in animal models, and confers significant colonization advantages to the bacteria. Our Listeria research uncovered a new mechanism and site where bacteria can breach the gastrointestinal epithelial barrier to invade. We found that Listeria find their receptor for invasion at sites of epithelial senescence, where the epithelial junctions undergo dynamic turnover. To study Salmonella and H. pylori we have developed a human organoid model to study their interactions with human gut epithelium in vitro. To study Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis, we have developed methods to visualize infection at the scale of a single bacterial microcolony using an organoid culture system of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts that grow into a 3D skin-equivalent. We recently identified several proteins at the eptithelial junctions as host factors involved in the pathogenesis of one of Staphylococcus aureus major toxins.