School of Medicine


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  • Gillian Abir

    Gillian Abir

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioGillian Abir graduated from Glasgow University (UK) in 1998. After initially undertaking parts of surgical residency and emergency medicine residency, she completed her anesthesiology residency training in Glasgow and Sheffield (UK). Following this she undertook an obstetric anesthesiology fellowship-equivalent at Stanford University School of Medicine and is currently a Clinical Professor.
    Gillian is the Associate Division Chief and Clinical Director for the Division of Obstetric Anesthesiology and the residency program coordinator for obstetric anesthesiology.
    Gillian has published several manuscripts and book chapters, and is the lead anesthesiologist in the multidisciplinary obstetric simulation team. She is a member of the obstetric disaster preparedness committee and labor and delivery patient safety committee, amongst several other committees. She is the co-chair of the simulation committee and a member of the patient safety and international outreach committees in the Society of Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology.
    Gillian has an interest in global health and is a member of the Board of Directors of Kybele Inc. (www.kybeleworldwide.org) for which she regularly volunteers to teach obstetric anesthesiology in other countries.

  • Rita Agarwal

    Rita Agarwal

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPart of the Society for Pediatric Anesthesia Information Network (SPAIN) Steering Committee, looking at shirt and long tern outcomes of various pain management techniques in children.

  • Anuj Aggarwal

    Anuj Aggarwal

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioAnuj Aggarwal, M.D., is both a practicing anesthesiologist and pain specialist. Originally from Southern California, Dr. Aggarwal completed his undergraduate studies in biology with honors at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA. He earned his medical degree from University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine with distinction, completing the Health Professions Education (HPE) Pathway advanced program. He completed his internship at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, CA. He then completed his Anesthesiology residency and Pain Medicine fellowship at Stanford Hospital, joining the faculty in 2018.

    In addition to his research and clinical areas of interest of perioperative pain and orofacial pain, he is the associate program director for the pain management fellowship, theme lead and course director for pharmacology for the medical school, and associate director for Science of Medicine overseeing the teaching of the various organ blocks in the pre-clerkship curriculum. He also is an E4C (Educator for Care) faculty member, teaching clinical skills, clinical reasoning and serving as a mentor to medical students throughout their training. In addition, he is involved within the anesthesia residency education programs through various committees, mentorship of residents, and direct teaching. Formerly, he served as the director of medical student and resident clerkships in pain management and pain theme lead in the pre-clerkship curriculum.

  • Kanwaljeet S. Anand

    Kanwaljeet S. Anand

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Critical Care) and of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Anand is a translational clinical researcher who pioneered research on the endocrine-metabolic stress responses of infants undergoing surgery and developed the first-ever scientific rationale for pain perception in early life. This provided a framework for newer methods of pain assessment, numerous clinical trials of analgesia/anesthesia in newborns, infants and older children. His research focus over the past 30+ years has contributed fundamental knowledge about pediatric pain/stress, long-term effects of pain in early life, management of pain, mechanisms for opioid tolerance and withdrawal. Current projects in his laboratory are focused on developing biomarkers for repetitive pain/stress in critically ill children and the mechanisms underlying sedative/anesthetic neurotoxicity in the immature brain. He designed and directed many randomized clinical trials (RCT), including the largest-ever pediatric analgesia trial studying morphine therapy in ventilated preterm neonates. He has extensive experience in clinical and translational research from participating in collaborative networks funded by NIMH, NINDS, or NICHD, a track-record of excellent collaboration across multiple disciplines, while achieving success with large research teams like the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN). He played a leadership roles in CANDLE (Condition Affecting Neuro-Development & Learning in Early infancy) and other activities of the Urban Child Institute and UT Neuroscience Institute. More recently, he led the NeoOpioid Consortium funded by the European Commission, which collected data from 243 NICUs in 18 European countries.

  • Thomas Anthony ("Tony") Anderson

    Thomas Anthony ("Tony") Anderson

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab's research focuses on two areas:
    1. Focused ultrasound for peripheral nervous system modulation- We are interested in the potential of focused ultrasound to modulate peripheral nerves and improve both acute and chronic pain.
    2. Pediatric perioperative outcomes- Our goals are to understand A) how various perioperative pain management strategies affect outcomes in children who undergo surgery and B) whether disparities in the perioperative pain management of children occur.

  • Kazuo Ando

    Kazuo Ando

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioBorn and raised in Japan, Dr. Ando received an MD-PhD degree from the Aichi Medical University. After anesthesia training, Dr. Ando came to Stanford to pursue clinical and basic research experience. During his postdoctoral fellowship in Dr. Gaudilliere's laboratory, Dr. Ando worked on publication of “A next-generation single-cell technology (mass cytometry) to study the feto-maternal immune system,” a project designed to evaluate the immune response associated with preterm birth. In addition, Dr. Ando performs research in Obstetric Anesthesia, such as respiratory monitoring after cesarean sections and labor satisfaction, to obtain clinical research experience and to understand the key differences in medicine between the United States and Japan.
    After his postdoctoral fellowship, Dr. Ando has maintained his status as a researcher in Dr. Gaudilliere's laboratory, continuing work relating to pregnancy and preterm birth.
    Dr. Ando divides his efforts between laboratory research and the clinic.

  • Timothy Angelotti MD, PhD

    Timothy Angelotti MD, PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research efforts are focused on investigating the pharmacological and physiological interface of the autonomic nervous system with effector organs. Utilizing molecular, cellular, and electrophysiological techniques, we are examining alpha2 adrenergic receptor function in cultured sympathetic neurons. Future research aims will be directed toward understanding neurotransmitter release in general.

  • Martin S. Angst

    Martin S. Angst

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies biological and clinical determinants of human resilience using surgery as an injury model.

  • Nicole E Arkin

    Nicole E Arkin

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioI am a critical care anesthesiologist who is devoted to providing excellent clinical care for the sickest patients and their families as well as training our next generation of leaders in critical care medicine.

    The ICU is a unique and fascinating world where I get to combine my love of abnormal physiology, teaching, high-stakes medical care, interdisciplinary collaboration, and deep connections with patients and families. As an intensivist, anesthesiologist, and medical educator, there is no place where this is truer than at Stanford. After completing both medical school and anesthesiology residency at Stanford, I experienced the ravages of the COVID-19 pandemic along with the innovation and collaboration that can result from moments of crisis as an Critical Care Medicine fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. I was drawn to return to Stanford to join our incredible group of intensivists based on the emphasis on interdisciplinary collaboration and professional growth. This rich environment is filled with interesting medicine and brilliant colleagues; it is a place that supports my goals of educating and training future leaders in critical care medicine while taking care of the sickest patients in the hospital and their families.

    While clinical practice is the foundation of what I love about being a physician, I am also interested in leadership development both through education and research. I have a Masters of Science in Teaching and spent two years as a high school chemistry teacher in the South Bronx through Teach for America where I focused on curriculum development. In residency, I became interested in feedback and led a mixed methods research study that identified gender bias in resident feedback during the early years of anesthesiology residency. Currently, I am the Associate Program Director of our Anesthesia Critical Care fellowship and am the Director of the required clerkship for medical students in the ICU. I feel incredibly privileged to work in a place that supports these pursuits and encourages me to be the best physician, colleague, and educator I can be.

  • Naola Austin

    Naola Austin

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioNaola S. Austin M.D., is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Stanford University and the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System. She co-directs the Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management (ACRM) course and teaches a number of simulation courses as faculty with the Center for Immersive and Simulation-based Learning, OB SIM Team, InterCEPT Team, and VA Palo Alto. As a point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) faculty, she teaches neuraxial, transthoracic, lung, gastric, FAST, and other ultrasound techniques. She is also a member of the Stanford Anesthesia Cognitive Aid Program (SACAP), a collaborative group who designs and updates the Stanford Emergency Manual.

    She is originally from New Mexico and received her medical degree at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, NY. After completing residency training in Anesthesiology at the University of Washington, she went on to dual fellowship training in Obstetric Anesthesia and Healthcare Simulation.

    In addition to her work as a Co-Primary Investigator with the Safety Learning Lab, she has published basic science articles on synapse biology, clinical reviews on cervical spine injury in trauma and burns, and Simulation and Communication in Obstetric care. She has received multiple honors including U.S.-E.U. Exchange Scholar Rogers’ Colloquium Speaker, Resident of the Year, Foundation for Anesthesia Education & Research Scholar, and Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society.

    Naola is an avid gardener, leisure cyclist, and very amateur rock climber.

  • Meredith Barad, MD

    Meredith Barad, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research interests involve novel treatment paradigms for challenging pain problems such as orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia and low pressure headaches. I am also interested in migraine and trigeminal autonomic cephalgias and their intersection with chronic pain.

  • Juliana Barr

    Juliana Barr

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) ICU Outcomes Research; 2) Clinical pharmacology of sedative-hypnotic agents in ICU patients.

  • Jennifer Basarab-Tung

    Jennifer Basarab-Tung

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioI enjoy providing anesthesia for a wide variety of patients, procedures, and conditions. My practice sites include the Stanford Main Operating Room, Ambulatory Surgical Center, Labor and Delivery, Outpatient Surgical Center in Redwood City, Cancer Center South Bay in Los Gatos, and Reproductive Endocrinology/Infertility in Sunnyvale. Some of my clinical areas of focus include thoracic surgery and obstetrics. I am also involved in resident education and help manage the resident lecture curriculum.

  • Brian T. Bateman

    Brian T. Bateman

    Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioBrian T. Bateman, MD, MSc is the Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine Endowed Professor and Chair of the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine.

    Before coming to Stanford, Dr. Bateman served as the Vice Chair for Faculty Development and Chief of the Division of Obstetric Anesthesia in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School and as Co-Director of the Harvard Program on Perinatal and Pediatric Pharmacoepidemiology in the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

    Dr. Bateman’s scholarship focuses on the study of medication safety in pregnancy and on predictors and management of maternal morbidity. To address questions in these areas, Dr. Bateman and collaborators at Harvard helped pioneer the use of advanced epidemiological techniques applied to large, routinely collected healthcare utilization data. This research has been funded by multiple R01 grants from the NIH and by grants from the FDA and has been published in leading clinical journals including NEJM, JAMA, BMJ, Lancet, Annals of Internal Medicine, JAMA Pediatrics, JAMA Psychiatry, and Obstetrics and Gynecology. Dr. Bateman’s bibliography contains over 300 publications. This research is frequently cited in clinical reviews and guidelines and has prompted both the FDA and EMA to make labelling changes to medications regarding use in pregnancy. Dr. Bateman is also a founding member of the International Pregnancy Safety Study Consortium (InPress) which is a collaborative effort between investigators from the US and each of the five Nordic countries to pool data for studies evaluating the safety of medications.

    Dr. Bateman currently serves as Chairperson of FDA’s Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee after having previously served a 4-year term (2015-2019) as a voting member of this Committee. He was a technical advisor for the recent revision of the Joint Commission’s pain management standards. He has served on expert panels and workshops sponsored by the National Academy of Medicine, the FDA, the NIH, the CDC, and the Department of Health and Human Services, and on multiple grant review committees for the NIH and other funders. He is an Editor for the journal, Anesthesiology, and the textbook, Chestnut’s Obstetric Anesthesia: Principles and Practice.

    Dr. Bateman’s work has been recognized by a number of awards including his selection in 2017 by the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology as the Gerard Ostheimer lecturer and in 2018 by the American Society of Anesthesiologists as the James E. Cottrell Presidential Scholar Awardee, which is given to one clinical-scientist each year within 10 years of initial faculty appointment for accomplishment in research.

    Faculty development and mentorship has been a central focus of Dr. Bateman’s career. He has mentored numerous trainees who have gone on to outstanding academic careers. Throughout his career, he has worked particularly hard to advance the careers of women and underrepresented minorities and to create environments where everyone is welcomed and has an opportunity to advance.

    Dr. Bateman is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate Yale College and received his MD from Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, where he was a member of Alpha Omega Alpha and was awarded the Janeway Prize for the highest achievements and abilities in the graduating class. He completed an internship in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and residency and chief residency in anesthesiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He completed a Masters in Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health.

  • Edward Bertaccini

    Edward Bertaccini

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsmolecular modeling of anesthetic-protein interactions, molecular modeling of the ligand-gated ion channels

  • Rashmi Parekh Bhandari

    Rashmi Parekh Bhandari

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical interventions, treatments, and outcomes in pediatric pain management

  • Anna Maria Bombardieri

    Anna Maria Bombardieri

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy overall research goal is to advance clinical practice by providing anesthesiologists with data to most effectively maintain cerebral blood flow in the perioperative period.
    I am interested in the effect of the autonomic nervous system on cerebral blood flow regulation.
    I intend to combine regional anesthetic techniques and noninvasive bedside cerebral blood flow monitoring to understand the effect of the sympathetic system on cerebral blood flow.
    A secondary goal is to apply this new knowledge to investigate whether cervical sympathetic blocks improve long term neurological outcomes.

  • Amber Noelle Borucki

    Amber Noelle Borucki

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Amber Borucki is an anesthesiologist and pain medicine specialist whose focus is chronic pain management in children and adolescents/young adults. She focuses on reducing or managing pain from chronic conditions or pain that occurs after surgery. Dr. Borucki completed her medical degree at Rush Medical College in Chicago, IL. She attended anesthesia residency at the University of Chicago. She completed a fellowship in pediatric anesthesiology at Boston Children's Hospital as well as a combined adult/pediatric pain medicine fellowship at Boston Children's Hospital, Brigham Women's Hospital, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Dr. Borucki worked for one year in private practice in anesthesiology in Reno, Nevada. Dr. Borucki then worked for 5 years as a pediatric anesthesiologist and pain medicine specialist and was the Director of the Pediatric Anesthesia Service at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital. Dr. Borucki transitioned to Stanford Medicine Children's Health in May 2023 and her clinical duties include working in the Emeryville satellite pediatric pain clinic, pediatric operating room, and pediatric pain inpatient service.

    Notable accomplishments include developing and co-chairing the UCSF Benioff Transbay Pediatric Pain Management Committee, development of the pediatric establishment of an adolescent/young adult transitional pain clinic, and serving on the Bridge to One Bay project to standardize pain care across all UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital locations. Dr. Borucki also was instrumental in helping UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital obtain ChildKind designation, a prestigious designation for a hospital indicating that it prioritizes pediatric pain care.

    Dr. Borucki is a member of the medical advisory council for the Make a Wish Bay Area chapter. She is currently serving on the Board of Directors for the Society for Pediatric Pain Medicine (SPPM) and also the associate program director for the upcoming 11th annual SPPM meeting. Dr. Borucki has also served on several committees through the American Society of Anesthesiologists and California Society of Anesthesiologists. Dr. Borucki served as an editorial board member for Paediatric and Neonatal Pain.

  • John Brock-Utne

    John Brock-Utne

    Professor (Clinical) of Anesthesia, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsA large variety of clinical research including new non-invasive warming technology, temperature measurement during anesthesia, new non-pulsetile oximetry, monitoring of systemic ischemia, new technology to be used in anesthesia, airway management, and operating room waste

  • Jay B. Brodsky

    Jay B. Brodsky

    Professor (Clinical) of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical aspects of anesthesia for non-cardiac thoracic surgery including lung separation techniques, management of one-lung ventilation and post-thoracotomy analgesia.
    Anesthesia for the morbidly obese patient' bariatric surgery

  • Jessica Brodt

    Jessica Brodt

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Education
    Regional Anesthesia for Cardiothoracic Enhanced Recovery (RACER)
    Anesthesia for transcatheter and electrophyiology procedures

  • Mark Burbridge

    Mark Burbridge

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioI am an anesthesiologist who subspecializes in the perioperative care of patients undergoing complex neurosurgical procedures. I regularly publish clinical research and have presented this research at national and international meetings. I am also heavily involved in the education of medical students, residents, and fellows at Stanford.

  • Alyssa Burgart (she/her)

    Alyssa Burgart (she/her)

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Pediatrics

    BioDr. Alyssa Burgart is a board certified pediatric anesthesiologist and bioethicist.

    Dr. Burgart specializes in pediatric anesthesia and pediatric abdominal transplant anesthesia. She has a special interest in transplantation, PANS/PANDAS, spinal muscular atrophy, and trauma. Dr. Burgart is committed to finding the most successful way for each child to interact with the anesthesia team, to create an overall positive experience. She champions children with unique needs, such as those with sensory integration differences.

    Dr. Burgart has a joint appointment in the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, serves as the Co-Chair of the LPCH Ethics Committee, and as a member of the SHC Ethics Committee. She provides ethics consultation services for people of all ages. Her ethics interests include pediatric ethics, organ transplantation, communication skills, disability rights, women's healthcare access, adolescent decision-making, ethics education, and excellence in ethics consultation.

    Dr. Burgart is active on several social media, where she comments on Anesthesiology and Bioethics issues. @BurgartBioethix

  • Alex Butwick

    Alex Butwick

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (OB)
    On Leave from 07/18/2023 To 07/01/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI perform outcomes-based research in obstetrics investigating strategies to better prevent and treat patients with postpartum hemorrhage, a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. I also have research interests in the use of point-of-care devices for investigating key changes in the maternal hematologic and hemostatic profiles that occur during the peripartum and postpartum periods.

  • Ian Carroll, MD, MS

    Ian Carroll, MD, MS

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult Pain)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are committed to promoting an understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, and ensuring that all patients who are suffering from cerebrospinal fluid leaks receive appropriate diagnosis and treatment of this devastating, chronic, and fixable condition. We believe this can be best accomplished in a multidisciplinary setting involving expertise in radiology, neurology, and interventional pain medicine.

  • Thomas Caruso

    Thomas Caruso

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research pursuits are focused on system based improvement projects. At Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, I use system based approaches to improve the quality of care patients receive in the perioperative area and in the ICUs, with a focus on safe transitions of care. Through the Department of Graduate Medical Education at Stanford School of Medicine, I advise residency and fellowship programs on evidence based methods to improve their programs, with a focus on mentorship.

  • Brendan Carvalho

    Brendan Carvalho

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main research interest is in clinical and translational research related to cesarean delivery and labor analgesia as well as maternal-fetal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics drug modeling.