School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 724 Results

  • Oliver O. Aalami, MD

    Oliver O. Aalami, MD

    Clinical Professor, Surgery - Vascular Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe launched a national precision medicine PAD trial called, VascTrac (http://vasctrac.stanford.edu/). This trial is mobile phone based and leverages Apple's ResearchKit Platform to monitor a patient's activity both pre- and post-intervention. We are validating mobile phone surveillance for PAD patients and are currently enrolling.

  • Deborah Aarhus

    Deborah Aarhus

    Administrative Director, Vera Moulton Wall Center for Pulmonary Vascular Disease, CVI/Vera Moulton Wall Center

    Current Role at StanfordAdministrative Director, Vera Moulton Wall Center for Pulmonary Vascular Disease at Stanford

  • Oscar J. Abilez

    Oscar J. Abilez

    Senior Scientist, Cardiothoracic Surgery - Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Abilez' interests are aimed at elucidating how various biophysical and biochemical perturbations regulate early cardiovascular development across time and length scales that span several orders of magnitude, using human pluripotent stem cells as a model system.

  • Christina Alamana

    Christina Alamana

    Life Science Research Professional 1, Cardiovascular Institute Operations

    Current Role at StanfordLife Science Research Professional at Wu Lab

  • Kevin M. Alexander, MD, FACC, FHFSA

    Kevin M. Alexander, MD, FACC, FHFSA

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioDr. Alexander is an advanced heart failure-trained cardiologist. He is also an Assistant Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Alexander specializes in the management of advanced heart failure and transplant cases, seeing a wide range of patients. He also has an active research laboratory, studying various forms of heart failure.

    Dr. Alexander has expertise in diagnosing and treating transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis, a critical yet underdiagnosed cause of heart failure among African Americans and the elderly. He is conducting extensive research to enhance our understanding of this condition, with grant support from the National Institutes of Health and American Heart Association, among other sources.

  • Russ B. Altman

    Russ B. Altman

    Kenneth Fong Professor and Professor of Bioengineering, of Genetics, of Medicine, of Biomedical Data Science, and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for HAI

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI refer you to my web page for detailed list of interests, projects and publications. In addition to pressing the link here, you can search "Russ Altman" on http://www.google.com/

  • Cristina Maria Alvira

    Cristina Maria Alvira

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Critical Care)
    On Leave from 04/01/2024 To 08/01/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe overall objective of the Alvira Laboratory is to elucidate the mechanisms that promote postnatal lung development and repair, by focusing on three main scientific goals: (i) identification of the signaling pathways that direct the transition between the saccular and alveolar stages of lung development; (ii) exploration of the interplay between postnatal vascular and alveolar development; and (iii) determination of developmentally regulated pathways that mediate lung repair after injury.

  • Michelle Ameri, BA, RVT

    Michelle Ameri, BA, RVT

    Adm Svcs Admstr 2, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Role at StanfordBASE Operations Manager

  • Zhainib A. Amir

    Zhainib A. Amir

    Ph.D. Student in Biology, admitted Autumn 2020

    BioI received my B.S. in Microbiology, and M.S. in Cell and Molecular Biology from San Francisco State University. Currently, I am a Biology Ph.D. student with an emphasis in Cell, Molecular and Organismal Biology at Stanford University. I am interested in a range of topics, from cell biology to cancer immunology, however, my research interests lie primarily in understanding the cellular mechanisms at play in genetic and autoimmune diseases.

  • Katrin Andreasson

    Katrin Andreasson

    Edward F. and Irene Thiele Pimley Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on understanding how immune responses initiate and accelerate synaptic and neuronal injury in age-related neurodegeneration, including models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We also focus on the role of immune responses in aggravating brain injury in models of stroke. Our goal is the identification of critical immune pathways that function in neurologic disorders and that can be targeted to elicit disease modifying effects.

  • Lay Teng Ang

    Lay Teng Ang

    Instructor, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

    BioAs a stem cell biologist, I aim to understand the mechanisms through which stem cells differentiate into progressively specialized cell types and to harness this knowledge to artificially generate pure populations of desired cell types from stem cells. My work over the past ten years has centered on pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, which include embryonic and pluripotent stem cells), which can generate any of the hundreds of diverse cell types in the body. However, it has been notoriously challenging to guide PSCs to differentiate into a pure population of a given cell type. Current differentiation strategies typically generate heterogeneous cell populations unsuitable for basic research or clinical applications. To address this challenge, I mapped the cascade of branching lineage choices through which PSCs differentiate into various endodermal and mesodermal cell types. I then developed effective methods to differentiate PSCs into specific lineages by providing the extracellular signal(s) that specify a given lineage while inhibiting the signals that induce the alternate fate(s), enabling the generation of highly-pure human heart and bone (Loh & Chen et al., 2016; Cell) and liver (Loh & Ang et al., 2014; Cell Stem Cell) from PSCs. My laboratory currently focuses on differentiating human PSCs into liver progenitors (Ang et al., 2018; Cell Reports) and blood vessel cells (Ang et al., 2022; Cell).

    I earned my Ph.D. jointly from the University of Cambridge and A*STAR and was subsequently appointed as a Research Fellow and, later, a Senior Research Fellow at the Genome Institute of Singapore. I then moved my laboratory to Stanford University as a Siebel Investigator and Instructor at the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology & Regenerative Medicine. My laboratory has been supported by the Siebel Investigatorship, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and other sources.

  • Timothy Angelotti MD, PhD

    Timothy Angelotti MD, PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research efforts are focused on investigating the pharmacological and physiological interface of the autonomic nervous system with effector organs. Utilizing molecular, cellular, and electrophysiological techniques, we are examining alpha2 adrenergic receptor function in cultured sympathetic neurons. Future research aims will be directed toward understanding neurotransmitter release in general.

  • Martin S. Angst

    Martin S. Angst

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies biological and clinical determinants of human resilience using surgery as an injury model.

  • Justin P. Annes M.D., Ph.D.

    Justin P. Annes M.D., Ph.D.

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)
    On Partial Leave from 05/01/2024 To 08/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe ANNES LABORATORY of Molecular Endocrinology: Leveraging Chemical Biology to Treat Endocrine Disorders

    DIABETES
    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing at a staggering rate. By the year 2050 an astounding 25% of Americans will be diabetic. The goal of my research is to uncover therapeutic strategies to stymie the ensuing diabetes epidemic. To achieve this goal we have developed a variety of innovate experimental approaches to uncover novel approaches to curing diabetes.

    (1) Beta-Cell Regeneration: Diabetes results from either an absolute or relative deficiency in insulin production. Our therapeutic strategy is to stimulate the regeneration of insulin-producing beta-cells to enhance an individual’s insulin secretion capacity. We have developed a unique high-throughput chemical screening platform which we use to identify small molecules that promote beta-cell growth. This work has led to the identification of key molecular pathways (therapeutic targets) and candidate drugs that promote the growth and regeneration of islet beta-cells. Our goal is to utilize these discoveries to treat and prevent diabetes.

    (2) The Metabolic Syndrome: A major cause of the diabetes epidemic is the rise in obesity which leads to a cluster of diabetes- and cardiovascular disease-related metabolic abnormalities that shorten life expectancy. These physiologic aberrations are collectively termed the Metabolic Syndrome (MS). My laboratory has developed an original in vivo screening platform t to identify novel hormones that influence the behaviors (excess caloric consumption, deficient exercise and disrupted sleep-wake cycles) and the metabolic abnormalities caused by obesity. We aim to manipulate these hormone levels to prevent the development and detrimental consequences of the MS.

    HEREDIATY PARAGAGLIOMA SYNDROME
    The Hereditary Paraganglioma Syndrome (hPGL) is a rare genetic cancer syndrome that is most commonly caused by a defect in mitochondrial metabolism. Our goal is to understand how altered cellular metabolism leads to the development of cancer. Although hPGL is uncommon, it serves as an excellent model for the abnormal metabolic behavior displayed by nearly all cancers. Our goal is to develop novel therapeutic strategies that target the abnormal behavior of cancer cells. In the laboratory we have developed hPGL mouse models and use high throughput chemical screening to identify the therapeutic susceptibilities that result from the abnormal metabolic behavior of cancer cells.

    As a physician scientist trained in clinical genetics I have developed expertise in hereditary endocrine disorders and devoted my efforts to treating families affected by the hPGL syndrome. By leveraging our laboratory expertise in the hPGL syndrome, our care for individuals who have inherited the hPGL syndrome is at the forefront of medicine. Our goal is to translate our laboratory discoveries to the treatment of affected families.