School of Medicine


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  • MyMy Buu

    MyMy Buu

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Pulmonary Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHer scholarly work has been focused on pediatric health in vulnerable communities. Her current research is pulmonary outcomes of patients with neuromuscular disease. She is involved in clinical trials in patients with neuromuscular disease.

  • Christina Buysse

    Christina Buysse

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTelemedicine to teach pediatrics residents Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics

  • Erica P. Cahill MD

    Erica P. Cahill MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsreproductive and sexual health care and education

  • Michele Calos

    Michele Calos

    Professor of Genetics, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is developing innovative gene and stem cell therapies for genetic diseases, with a focus on gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

    We have created novel methods for inserting therapeutic genes into the chromosomes at specific places by using homologous recombination and recombinase enzymes.

    We are working on 3 forms of muscular dystrophy.

    We created induced pluripotent stem cells from patient fibroblasts, added therapeutic genes, differentiated, and engrafted the cells.

  • David Camarillo

    David Camarillo

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering
    On Leave from 04/01/2022 To 06/30/2022

    BioDavid B. Camarillo is Associate Professor of Bioengineering, (by courtesy) Mechanical Engineering and Neurosurgery at Stanford University. Dr. Camarillo holds a B.S.E in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University, a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University and completed postdoctoral fellowships in Biophysics at the UCSF and Biodesign Innovation at Stanford. Dr. Camarillo worked in the surgical robotics industry at Intuitive Surgical and Hansen Medical, before launching his laboratory at Stanford in 2012. His current research focuses on precision human measurement for multiple clinical and physiological areas including the brain, heart, lungs, and reproductive system. Dr. Camarillo has been awarded the Hellman Fellowship, the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program award, among other honors including multiple best paper awards in brain injury and robotic surgery. His research has been funded by the NIH, NSF, DoD, as well as corporations and private philanthropy. His lab’s research has been featured on NPR, the New York Times, The Washington Post, Science News, ESPN, and TED.com as well as other media outlets aimed at education of the public.

  • Jan Carette

    Jan Carette

    Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on the identification of host genes that play critical roles in the pathogenesis of infectious agents including viruses. We use haploid genetic screens in human cells as an efficient approach to perform loss-of-function studies. Besides obtaining fundamental insights on how viruses hijack cellular processes and on host defense mechanisms, it may also facilitate the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  • Jennifer Carlson

    Jennifer Carlson

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Adolescent Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests and scholarship fall into two major "buckets" of activity: 1) confidentiality and clinical informatics and 2) eating disorders, particularly the Female/Male Athlete Triad.

  • Suzan Carmichael

    Suzan Carmichael

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Neonatology), of Obstetrics & Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Carmichael is a perinatal and nutritional epidemiologist and Professor of Pediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Her team is committed to finding ways to improve maternal and infant health outcomes and equity by leading research that identifies effective leverage points for change, from upstream 'macro' social and structural factors, to downstream clinical factors (eg, related to care and morbidities) through a collaborative research approach that integrates epidemiologic approaches with community engagement and systems thinking.

    Exposure themes include social context, nutrition, care, environmental contaminants and genetics. Outcome themes include severe maternal morbidity, stillbirth, birth defects, and preterm delivery. She is particularly interested in understanding the intersectionality of these varied types of exposures and outcomes and how they interact to impact health and health disparities, for the mother-baby dyad.

    Please see the team web-site for further information!
    https://med.stanford.edu/carmichaellab.html

  • Victor G. Carrión

    Victor G. Carrión

    John A. Turner Endowed Professor for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExamines the interplay between brain development and stress vulnerability via a multi-method approach that includes psychophysiology, neuroimaging, neuroendocrinology and phenomenology. Treatment development that focuses on individual and community-based interventions for stress related conditions in children and adolescents that experience traumatic stress.

  • Thomas Caruso

    Thomas Caruso

    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    Ph.D. Student in Education, admitted Autumn 2019

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research pursuits are focused on system based improvement projects. At Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, I use system based approaches to improve the quality of care patients receive in the perioperative area and in the ICUs, with a focus on safe transitions of care. Through the Department of Graduate Medical Education at Stanford School of Medicine, I advise residency and fellowship programs on evidence based methods to improve their programs, with a focus on mentorship.

  • Brendan Carvalho

    Brendan Carvalho

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main research interest is in clinical and translational research related to cesarean delivery and labor analgesia as well as maternal-fetal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics drug modeling.

  • Alma-Martina Cepika

    Alma-Martina Cepika

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    BioDr. Cepika is an immunologist with an extensive background in translational research, autoimmunity, autoinflammation, and human systems immunology. Her goal is to understand the mechanisms governing immunological tolerance, and to leverage this knowledge to cure currently incurable diseases.

    Dr. Cepika received her MD degree and a PhD in Immunology from the University of Zagreb School of Medicine in Croatia. There, she focused on the immunomonitoring of patients with lupus, identifying how circulating DNA levels changed with therapy. Subsequently, she joined the lab of Dr. Virginia Pascual at the Baylor Institute for Immunology Research in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Pascual had previously discovered that IL-1beta is a key pathogenic player in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), but the immune alterations contributing to IL-1beta-mediated inflammation remained unknown. To address this, Dr. Cepika developed a 3D in vitro stimulation assay to evaluate immune responses of blood leukocytes of pediatric sJIA patients. In combination with integrated bioinformatics analysis, this approach identified aberrant cellular responses, transcriptional pathways and genes that shed new light on immune dysregulation in sJIA. This assay can be further applied to dissect underlying immunopathogenic mechanisms in many human disorders.

    Currently, Dr. Cepika is a member of the laboratory of Dr. Maria Grazia Roncarolo, in the Pediatric Division of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. There, she is working to uncover the underlying mechanisms governing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cell differentiation and function, and use this knowledge to design Tr1 cell-based therapies for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, cancer immunotherapy and autoimmunity.

  • Lisa J. Chamberlain

    Lisa J. Chamberlain

    Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) and, by courtesy, of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsChild Health disparities - Projects focus on elucidating the non-clinical factors that impact access to appropriate care for children with chronic illness.

    Health Policy - Projects explore the intersection of medicine as a profession and formation of child health policy.

  • Charles Chan

    Charles Chan

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Chan's research interests include identifying risk factors for growth plate injuries during ACL reconstruction, developing new strategies to prevent pediatric sports injuries, and clinical outcomes of surgical reconstructions in the pediatric athlete.

  • Anne Lynn S. Chang, MD

    Anne Lynn S. Chang, MD

    Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have two main research interests:
    1) to better understand and treat patients with aggressive basal and squamous cell carcinomas
    2) to better understand the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of healthy human skin aging and to translate these insights into better care of skin diseases enriched in older patients particularly skin cancer and rosacea

  • Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Howard Y. Chang, MD, PhD

    Virginia and D. K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Research and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research is focused on how the activities of hundreds or even thousands of genes (gene parties) are coordinated to achieve biological meaning. We have pioneered methods to predict, dissect, and control large-scale gene regulatory programs; these methods have provided insights into human development, cancer, and aging.

  • Stephanie Chao

    Stephanie Chao

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Chao is passionate about disease prevention as she believes it is the ultimate way to impact the health of a population. Surgeons often see the devastating, end-results of the failure of prevention. With this perspective, Dr. Chao believes that it is crucial for surgeons to be active in prevention research. Dr. Chao currently serves as Trauma Medical Director of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital and focuses much of her research on injury prevention.

  • Danton Char

    Danton Char

    Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Pediatric)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Char's research is focused on identifying and addressing ethical concerns associated with the implementation of next generation technologies like whole genome sequencing and its attendant technologies like machine learning to bedside clinical care.

  • Vivek Charu

    Vivek Charu

    Assistant Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Quantitative Sciences)

    BioI am a physician and a biostatistician. My clinical expertise is in the diagnosis of non-neoplastic kidney and liver disease (including transplantation). My research interests center on the design of observational studies and clinical trials, the analysis of observational data, and causal inference.

  • Bertha Chen, MD

    Bertha Chen, MD

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Gynecology - Urogynecology) and, by courtesy, of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Chen’s research examines the molecular causes of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor dysfunction. Recognizing that urinary incontinence linked to demise of smooth muscle sphincter function, she is investigating the potential use of stem cell regeneration to restore muscle capacity.

  • James K. Chen

    James K. Chen

    Jauch Professor and Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology, of Developmental Biology and of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory combines chemistry and developmental biology to investigate the molecular events that regulate embryonic patterning, tissue regeneration, and tumorigenesis. We are currently using genetic and small-molecule approaches to study the molecular mechanisms of Hedgehog signaling, and we are developing chemical technologies to perturb and observe the genetic programs that underlie vertebrate development.

  • Lu Chen

    Lu Chen

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWhat distinguishes us humans from other animals is our ability to undergo complex behavior. The synapses are the structural connection between neurons that mediates the communication between neurons, which underlies our various cognitive function. My research program aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie synapse function during behavior in the developing and mature brain, and how synapse function is altered during mental retardation.

  • Alan G. Cheng, MD

    Alan G. Cheng, MD

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsActive Wnt signaling maintains somatic stem cells in many organ systems. Using Wnt target genes as markers, we have characterized distinct cell populations with stem cell behavior in the inner ear, an organ thought to be terminally differentiated. Ongoing work focuses on delineating the developing significance of these putative stem/progenitor cells and their behavior after damage.

  • Sundari Chetty

    Sundari Chetty

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Chetty lab is interested in understanding the mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. In particular, our group has been investigating the mechanisms underlying brain overgrowth or undergrowth in these disorders using human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technology. Changes in brain size often precede clinical symptoms, suggesting that understanding the underlying mechanisms regulating brain overgrowth or undergrowth could provide a window of opportunity for intervention or mitigation of symptoms.

    Using hiPSCs from idiopathic patients as well as those with known genetic variations, we generate iPSC-derived cortical neural and oligodendroglial cells to investigate changes at the cellular, functional, and mechanistic levels using a broad range of techniques from RNA sequencing, genome editing, to functional assays in in vitro and in vivo models. The overarching goal of our research program is to identify novel therapeutic targets based on these mechanistic insights.

  • Albert Sean Chiou, MD, MBA

    Albert Sean Chiou, MD, MBA

    Clinical Associate Professor, Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a clinical researcher interested in evaluating promising new diagnostic paradigms and treatments for serious or poorly treated, chronic skin conditions. My research currently includes:

    Therapeutics:

    - Treatments for itch from epidermolysis bullosa

    - Treatments for chronic wounds for patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (In collaboration with Dr. Jean Tang and Dr. Peter Marinkovich)

    - Treatments for atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and other inflammatory skin conditions

    Diagnostics:

    - Artificial intelligence approaches for melanoma and skin cancer early detection

    - Imaging mass spectrometry for skin cancer margin analysis and diagnosis

    I collaborate with other faculty within the Stanford Skin Innovation and Interventional Research Group (SIIRG) to conduct investigator initiated and sponsored clinical trials seeking to improve care for important dermatologic diseases

    Please learn more about our work at: https://siirg.stanford.edu/

  • Bill Chiu

    Bill Chiu

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery)

    BioDr. Chiu obtained his B.S. degree in Biological Sciences and graduated with Honors from Stanford University. After graduating, he received his Medical Degree at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, where he remained for his internship and General Surgery residency training. Dr. Chiu completed his Pediatric Surgery training at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. He is an Associate Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine where he has an active research program studying innovative approaches to treat patients with neuroblastoma.

  • Valerie Chock

    Valerie Chock

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeurological monitoring in critically ill infants. Altered hemodynamics in neonates, especially in relation to prematurity, congenital heart disease, and central nervous system injury. Determination of the hemodynamic significance and effects of a patent ductus arteriosus in the preterm infant. Utilizing NIRS (near-infrared spectroscopy) and other technologies for improved monitoring in the NICU.

  • Ricky Y. Choi, MD, MPH

    Ricky Y. Choi, MD, MPH

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    BioRicky Y. Choi, MD, MPH is Clinical Assistant Professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine in the Division of General Pediatrics where he attends on the newborn nursery service and in outpatient clinic. He also leads digital health initiatives for the Division. In the past he has served in a number of clinical leadership positions including as the Department Head of Pediatrics at Asian Health Services Community Health Center in Oakland, CA. He has held multiple national physician leadership roles for many years including the Board of Directors for the National Physicians Alliance and as the founding Chair of the Immigrant Child Health Group of the American Academy of Pediatrics. He is a past Fellow of the California HealthCare Foundation Health Care Leadership Program.

    In addition to his clinical work, Dr. Choi serves as Global Medical Director at Samsung Electronics where he leads virtual care, strategy and strategic partnerships. Initially based out of Samsung's headquarters in South Korea and now in the Bay Area, Dr. Choi's expertise is in delivering improved clinical and financial outcomes by using consumer technologies to drive health engagement.

  • HyeRan Choo

    HyeRan Choo

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery

    BioDr. HyeRan Choo is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. She is Director of Pediatric Craniofacial and Airway Orthodontics and Dental Sleep Medicine in the Department of Surgery and Director of Pediatric Craniofacial and Airway Orthodontic Fellowship at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford. She is also a Faculty Fellow of the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign.

    After graduating from Seoul National University with a combined degree in Natural Sciences and Dental Surgery in 2002, Dr. Choo received her Dental Medicine degree from the University of Pennsylvania. She completed her orthodontic residency and Masters in Science degree program at the University of Alabama in Birmingham. Following her Craniofacial Fellowship at the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) / National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), Dr. Choo was recruited as a full-time faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania and The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr. Choo joined the faculty of Stanford University School of Medicine in 2016. Dr. Choo is a board-certified craniofacial orthodontist by American Board of Orthodontics since 2008 and became a diplomate of the American Board of Dental Sleep Medicine in 2021.

    Dr. Choo’s areas of expertise are non-surgical airway management and facial reconstruction for newborns with cleft and/or Robin Sequence in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Her treatments utilize simple custom-fabricated orthodontic devices to establish a healthy environment to correct neonatal orofacial abnormalities with great respect for natural growth potential of each neonate. She also practices the full scope of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea management as well as orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics for patients with cleft and craniofacial abnormalities in a multi-disciplinary clinical setting.

    Dr. Choo’s treatment philosophy is based on a fundamental understanding of facial growth and oral functions (Biocreative Orthodontic Strategy). Her research focuses on translation of health innovation technology for the advancement of infant orthodontics. She also pioneers the development of skeletal anchorage-based orthodontic and orthopedic treatment strategies for pediatric sleep apnea patients.

  • Danny Hung-Chieh Chou

    Danny Hung-Chieh Chou

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program integrates concepts of chemical biology, protein engineering and structure biology to design new therapeutic leads and generate probes to study biological processes. A key focus of our lab is insulin, an essential hormone in our body to reduce blood glucose levels. We generate synthetic libraries of insulin analogs to select for chemical probes, and investigate natural insulin molecules (e.g. from the venom of fish-hunting cone snails!) to develop novel therapeutic candidates. We are especially interested in using chemical and enzymatic synthesis to create novel chemical entities with enhanced properties, and leverage the strong expertise of our collaborators to apply our skill sets in the fields of cancer biology, immunology and pain research. Our ultimate goal is to translate our discovery into therapeutic interventions in human diseases.

  • Gilbert Chu

    Gilbert Chu

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAfter shuttering the wet lab, we have focused on: a point-of-care device to measure blood ammonia and prevent brain damage; a human protein complex that juxtaposes and joins DNA ends for repair and V(D)J recombination; and strategies for teaching students and for reducing selection bias in educational programs.

  • Henry Chubb

    Henry Chubb

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestshttps://www.researchgate.net/profile/Henry_Chubb

  • Shoa L. Clarke, MD, PhD

    Shoa L. Clarke, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Medicine
    Instructor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    BioDr. Clarke is a preventive cardiologist and an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine in the Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics. He earned his undergraduate degree in human biology from the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University before obtaining his MD and PhD (genetics) from Stanford University School of Medicine. He has completed clinical training in internal medicine (Brigham & Women’s Hospital), pediatrics (Boston Children’s Hospital), and cardiovascular medicine (Stanford Hospital), and he is board certified in all three specialties. His research is focused on 1) understanding complex disease genetics in diverse populations, 2) integrating monogenic and polygenic risk with clinical risk, 3) large-scale phenotyping using the electronic health record. His clinical practice focuses on identifying risk factors for cardiovascular disease with the goal of promoting health and longevity through evidence-based personalized treatment. He is interested in developing family-centric approaches for the treatment of adults and children carrying high genetic risk for disease.

  • Michael Cleary

    Michael Cleary

    Lindhard Family Professor of Pediatric Cancer Biology and Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe role of oncoproteins in cancer and development; molecular and cellular biology of hematologic malignancies; targeted molecular therapies of cancer.

  • Jennifer R. Cochran

    Jennifer R. Cochran

    Shriram Chair of the Department of Bioengineering, Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular Engineering, Protein Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Cell and Tissue Engineering, Molecular Imaging, Chemical Biology

  • Harvey Cohen

    Harvey Cohen

    Deborah E. Addicott - John A. Kriewall and Elizabeth A. Haehl Family Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests extend from hypothesis-driven studies in biochemistry and cell biology to discovery-driven interests in proteomics and systems biology to clinical treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia of children, and pediatric palliative care.

  • Carol Conrad

    Carol Conrad

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Pulmonary Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in studying the effects of inflammation in the lung, in particular, how N-acetylcysteine may affect and decrease that in CF patients. I am the PI of a multi-center study researching this question. Additionally, in a separate study involving children who have received lung transplants, I am a participating site in an NIH-sponsored observational and mechanistic multi-center study that will examine the role of viral infections in causing chronic graft rejection.

  • Christopher H. Contag

    Christopher H. Contag

    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe develop and use the tools of molecular imaging to understand oncogenesis, reveal patterns of cell migration in immunosurveillance, monitor gene expression, visualize stem cell biology, and assess the distribution of pathogens in living animal models of human biology and disease. Biology doesn't occur in "a vacuum" or on coated plates--it occurs in the living body and that's were we look for biological patterns and responses to insult.

  • Despina Contopoulos-Ioannidis, MD

    Despina Contopoulos-Ioannidis, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEvidence based medicine: Systematic reviews, Meta-analyses
    Congenital Infections-Prenatal Screening with Point-Of-Care Tests
    Congenital Toxoplasmosis
    Comparative effectiveness-Comparative safety research
    Outcomes research (Patient safety)
    Antimicrobial Stewardship
    Early Life Antibiotic Use and Weight Gain

  • John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur translational research program in vascular regeneration is focused on generating and characterizing vascular cells from human induced pluripotential stem cells. We are also studying the therapeutic application of these cells in murine models of peripheral arterial disease. In these studies we leverage our longstanding interest in endothelial signaling, eg by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as by nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR).

  • Margaret Cooke, MD

    Margaret Cooke, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    BioDr. Cooke is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. She has a strong clinical interest in hand, wrist, and elbow surgery for adult and pediatric patients. She is dual fellowship trained in Hand & Upper Extremity Surgery and Pediatric & Congenital Hand Surgery.

    As an orthopaedic surgeon, Dr. Cooke’s goal is to alleviate pain and improve hand, wrist, and elbow function so that her patients can return to the activities they enjoy. Her primary clinical interests are nerve compression (carpal tunnel), nerve injuries (traumatic/lacerations), joint instability/arthritis (degenerative conditions of the hand wrist and elbow), sports/athletic injuries, fracture care, and pediatric & congenital conditions of the hand and upper extremity.

    Dr. Cooke utilizes a multi-disciplinary approach in order to provide comprehensive care for each patient. She works closely with colleagues from oncology, radiology, physical therapy, and other specialties. Her team includes certified hand therapists, cast technicians, medical assistants, and patient care coordinators. Together, Dr. Cooke and her team are committed to providing the best possible care for patients.

    She invites patient referrals as early as possible when an upper extremity problem is suspected. She ensures a trusting relationship with referring physicians (whether primary care providers or specialists) by staying in communication so they understand and are comfortable with her recommendations.

    In addition to patient care, Dr. Cooke has enjoyed contributing to her field through research. Among Dr. Cooke’s clinical research interests is fracture healing, including gene expression following administration of medication to stimulate bone repair. She has authored articles on topics like infection prediction and pain management after surgical repair of fractures. Her work has appeared in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, Journal of Orthopaedic Research, Osteoarthritis & Cartilage, Spine, and Transplantation. She also co-wrote the chapter “The History of Carpal Tunnel” for the textbook Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Related Median Neuropathies.

    Dr. Cooke’s honors include a Howard Hughes Research Fellowship, an Outstanding Chief Resident Research Award, and recognition for authoring one of the top ten Foot & Ankle research papers at the 2016 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons conference.

    In addition to her practice in the U.S., Dr. Cooke has traveled abroad as a physician volunteer to provide surgical services in underserved areas where there is no access to hand surgery specialists. In partnership with the surgeon-founded nonprofit organization Touching Hands, she has performed hand surgeries on adult and pediatric patients in Honduras. Dr. Cooke also has traveled with Shriners Hospital to treat children in Davao, Philippines.

  • David N. Cornfield

    David N. Cornfield

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOver the past 20 years, the Cornfield Laboratory has focused upon basic, translational and clinical research, with a primary focus on lung biology. As an active clinician-scientist, delivering care to acutely and chronically ill infants and children, our lab focuses on significant clinical challenges and tried to use science to craft novel solutions to difficult clinical problems.

  • Victoria Cosgrove

    Victoria Cosgrove

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Cosgrove studies putative roles for life and family stress as well as inflammatory and neurotrophic pathways in the etiology and development of mood disorders across the life span.

  • Helio Costa

    Helio Costa

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    BioHelio Costa, PhD, is a medical geneticist with expertise in oncology, medical genetics and genomics, computational biology, data science, software engineering, and product development. He is passionate about leveraging his interdisciplinary skillset to build and develop commercial-grade cancer diagnostic products and medical software that aid in patient care and clinical decision support. Currently he is Medical Director of Oncology at Natera, and an Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathology at Stanford Medical School.

    Dr. Costa's research focuses on developing and implementing new medical diagnostic genetic tests and software for use in patient care. His research group developed DNA and RNA cancer diagnostic tests currently in use at Stanford Health Care as well as developing clinical algorithms using large-scale clinical laboratory datasets and patient electronic medical records to predict patient outcomes and aid in therapeutic clinical decision support. Additionally, Dr. Costa served as a co-Investigator in the NIH Clinical Genome Resource (ClinGen) Consortium, and led the engineering and product management teams developing FDA-recognized medical software applications used by healthcare providers, researchers, and biotechnology companies to define the clinical relevance of genes and pathogenicity of mutations identified in patients.

    Dr. Costa is the founding director of the Stanford Clinical Data Science Fellowship where post-doctoral fellows engage in interdisciplinary clinical research and embed in health care workflows learning, building and deploying real-world health data solutions in the Stanford Health Care system. He is currently an Attending Medical Geneticist for the Molecular Genetic Pathology Laboratory at Stanford Health Care where he previously served as an Assistant Lab Director.

    Dr. Costa received his BS in Genetics from University of California at Davis, his PhD in Genetics from Stanford University School of Medicine, and his ABMGG Clinical Molecular Genetics and Genomics fellowship training from Stanford University School of Medicine.

  • Tina Cowan

    Tina Cowan

    Professor of Pathology (Clinical) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Genetics)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsscreening and diagnosis of patients with inborn errors of metabolism, including newborn screening, development of new testing methods and genotype/phenotype correlations.

  • Kenneth L. Cox

    Kenneth L. Cox

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGastroenterology, biliary motility, hormonal regulation, embryology, gastrointestinal tract, clinical management of pediatric liver transplant recipients.

  • Jacquelyn Nicole Crane

    Jacquelyn Nicole Crane

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioDr. Jacquelyn Crane is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Pediatric Hematology Oncology division at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, Stanford University School of Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree from Dartmouth College. She then conducted laboratory-based genetics research for two years in the Pauls lab at Massachusetts General Hospital. She received her medical degree from Tufts University School of Medicine and completed her pediatrics residency and pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship training at University of California Los Angeles. As a pediatric hematology & oncology fellow, she engaged in computational analysis of osteosarcoma transcriptomic data in the Graeber Lab and completed a medical education fellowship certificate program. Her primary clinical and research interests include sarcomas and other solid tumors, cancer genomics, clinical trials and medical education. She is the associate program director of the pediatric hematology-oncology fellowship.

  • Alia Crum

    Alia Crum

    Associate Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab focuses on how subjective mindsets (e.g., thoughts, beliefs and expectations) can alter objective reality through behavioral, psychological, and physiological mechanisms. We are interested in understanding how mindsets affect important outcomes both within and beyond the realm of medicine, in the domains such as exercise, diet and stress. https://mbl.stanford.edu/

  • Agnieszka Czechowicz

    Agnieszka Czechowicz

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Czechowicz’s research is aimed at understanding how hematopoietic stem cells interact with their microenvironment in order to subsequently modulate these interactions to improve bone marrow transplantation and unlock biological secrets that further enable regenerative medicine broadly. This work can be applied across a variety of disease states ranging from rare genetic diseases, autoimmune diseases, solid organ transplantation, microbiome-augmentation and cancer.

  • Gary Dahl

    Gary Dahl

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHematology/Oncology, Phase I drug studies for childhood cancer, overcoming multidrug resistance in leukemia and solid tumors, biology and treatment of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, early detection of central nervous system leukemia by measuring growth, factor binding proteins.

  • Jeremy Dahl

    Jeremy Dahl

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUltrasonic beamforming, imaging methods, systems, and devices.

  • Hongjie Dai

    Hongjie Dai

    The J.G. Jackson and C.J. Wood Professor of Chemistry

    BioProfessor Dai’s research spans chemistry, physics, and materials and biomedical sciences, leading to materials with properties useful in electronics, energy storage and biomedicine. Recent developments include near-infrared-II fluorescence imaging, ultra-sensitive diagnostic assays, a fast-charging aluminum battery and inexpensive electrocatalysts that split water into oxygen and hydrogen fuels.

    Born in 1966 in Shaoyang, China, Hongjie Dai began his formal studies in physics at Tsinghua U. (B.S. 1989) and applied sciences at Columbia U. (M.S. 1991). He obtained his Ph.D. from Harvard U and performed postdoctoral research with Dr. Richard Smalley. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1997, and in 2007 was named Jackson–Wood Professor of Chemistry. Among many awards, he has been recognized with the ACS Pure Chemistry Award, APS McGroddy Prize for New Materials, Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics and Materials Research Society Mid-Career Award. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, National Academy of Sciences (NAS), National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and Foreign Member of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

    The Dai Laboratory has advanced the synthesis and basic understanding of carbon nanomaterials and applications in nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, energy storage and electrocatalysis.

    Nanomaterials
    The Dai Lab pioneered some of the now-widespread uses of chemical vapor deposition for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth, including vertically aligned nanotubes and patterned growth of single-walled CNTs on wafer substrates, facilitating fundamental studies of their intrinsic properties. The group developed the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons, and of nanocrystals and nanoparticles on CNTs and graphene with controlled degrees of oxidation, producing a class of strongly coupled hybrid materials with advanced properties for electrochemistry, electrocatalysis and photocatalysis. The lab’s synthesis of a novel plasmonic gold film has enhanced near-infrared fluorescence up to 100-fold, enabling ultra-sensitive assays of disease biomarkers.

    Nanoscale Physics and Electronics
    High quality nanotubes from his group’s synthesis are widely used to investigate the electrical, mechanical, optical, electro-mechanical and thermal properties of quasi-one-dimensional systems. Lab members have studied ballistic electron transport in nanotubes and demonstrated nanotube-based nanosensors, Pd ohmic contacts and ballistic field effect transistors with integrated high-kappa dielectrics.

    Nanomedicine and NIR-II Imaging
    Advancing biological research with CNTs and nano-graphene, group members have developed π–π stacking non-covalent functionalization chemistry, molecular cellular delivery (drugs, proteins and siRNA), in vivo anti-cancer drug delivery and in vivo photothermal ablation of cancer. Using nanotubes as novel contrast agents, lab collaborations have developed in vitro and in vivo Raman, photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging. Lab members have exploited the physics of reduced light scattering in the near-infrared-II (1000-1700nm) window and pioneered NIR-II fluorescence imaging to increase tissue penetration depth in vivo. Video-rate NIR-II imaging can measure blood flow in single vessels in real time. The lab has developed novel NIR-II fluorescence agents, including CNTs, quantum dots, conjugated polymers and small organic dyes with promise for clinical translation.

    Electrocatalysis and Batteries
    The Dai group’s nanocarbon–inorganic particle hybrid materials have opened new directions in energy research. Advances include electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and water splitting catalysts including NiFe layered-double-hydroxide for oxygen evolution. Recently, the group also demonstrated an aluminum ion battery with graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes, a substantial breakthrough in battery science.

  • Heike Daldrup-Link

    Heike Daldrup-Link

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs a physician-scientist involved in the care of pediatric patients and developing novel pediatric molecular imaging technologies, my goal is to link the fields of nanotechnology and medical imaging towards more efficient diagnoses and image-guided therapies. Our research team develops novel imaging techniques for improved cancer diagnosis, for image-guided-drug delivery and for in vivo monitoring of cell therapies in children and young adults.

  • Mihaela Damian MD

    Mihaela Damian MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Pharmacology
    Sedation
    Solid Organ Transplantation

  • Gary Darmstadt

    Gary Darmstadt

    Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    On Partial Leave from 01/03/2022 To 11/30/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have extensive experience in the development of global health innovations and in working to test and scale-up health interventions. At Stanford University, I am playing a leading role in developing global women and children’s health research and educational programs, including the establishment of a Global Center for Gender Equality at Stanford University. My research focuses on advancing child health and development in low resource settings and advancing gender equality and health globally, and includes several applications of artificial intelligence. Before joining Stanford, I was Senior Fellow at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), where I led the development of initiatives to address gender inequalities and empower women and girls. Prior to this role, I served as the BMGF Director of Family Health, leading strategy development and implementation across maternal, newborn and child health, nutrition, and family planning. In this role, I was responsible for investments ranging from scientific discovery to intervention development and delivery of interventions at scale. I worked closely with the Discovery team to shape discovery and development investments and was a co-founder of the Saving Lives at Birth Development Grand Challenge, the Putting Women and Girls at the Center of Development Grand Challenge, and the Healthy Birth, Growth and Development initiative. Based on these experiences, I understand how to identify knowledge gaps and generate evidence of impact for new interventions, and how to utilize evidence to influence the policy dialogue leading to programmatic adoption and scale-up of interventions in low income settings. As Director of Family Health, I also co-led the development and implementation of the BMGF global health strategy for India, which cuts across multiple health and development sectors. Before joining BMGF, I was Associate Professor and Founding Director of the International Center for Advancing Neonatal Health in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. I led the development of newborn health research, including numerous facility- and community-based maternal and child health research trials. Before joining Johns Hopkins, I was Senior Research Advisor for the $50M Saving Newborn Lives program of Save the Children-US, where I led the development and implementation of the global research strategy for newborn health and survival.

  • Jenna Davis

    Jenna Davis

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Higgins-Magid Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Davis’ research and teaching deals broadly with the role that water plays in promoting public health and economic development, with particular emphasis on low- and middle-income countries. Her group conducts applied research that utilizes theory and analytical methods from public and environmental health, engineering, microeconomics, and planning. They have conducted field research in more than 20 countries, most recently including Zambia, Bangladesh, and Kenya.

  • Kara Davis

    Kara Davis

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsChildhood cancers can be considered aberrations of normal tissue development. We are interested in understanding childhood cancers through the lens of normal development. Further, individual tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations, not all cells being equal in their ability to respond to treatment or to repopulate a tumor. Thus, we take single cell approach to determine populations of clinical relevance.

  • Mark M. Davis

    Mark M. Davis

    Director, Stanford Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection and the Burt and Marion Avery Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms of lymphocyte recognition and differentiation; Systems immunology and human immunology; vaccination and infection.

  • Ronald W. Davis

    Ronald W. Davis

    Professor of Biochemistry and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Human to conduct whole genome analysis projects. The yeast genome sequence has approximately 6,000 genes. We have made a set of haploid and diploid strains (21,000) containing a complete deletion of each gene. In order to facilitate whole genome analysis each deletion is molecularly tagged with a unique 20-mer DNA sequence. This sequence acts as a molecular bar code and makes it easy to identify the presence of each deletion.

  • John W. Day, MD, PhD

    John W. Day, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology, of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur Neuromuscular Division coordinates a comprehensive effort to conquer peripheral nerve and muscle disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, motor neuron disorders, neuromuscular junction abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathies. With patients and families foremost in mind, we have had success defining and combating these diseases, with research focused on identifying genetic causes, developing novel treatment, and maximizing patient function by optimizing current management.

  • Vinicio de Jesus Perez MD

    Vinicio de Jesus Perez MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy work is aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the development and progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). I am interested in understanding the role that the BMP and Wnt pathways play in regulating functions of pulmonary endothelial and smooth muscle cells both in health and disease.

  • Luis de Lecea

    Luis de Lecea

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical and Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab uses molecular, optogenetic, anatomical and behavioral methods to identify and manipulate the neuronal circuits underlying brain arousal, with particular attention to sleep and wakefulness transitions. We are also interested in the changes that occur in neuronal circuits in conditions of hyperarousal such as stress and drug addiction.

  • Cornelia L. Dekker, M.D.

    Cornelia L. Dekker, M.D.

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Stanford-LPCH Vaccine Program provides an infrastructure for conducting clinical studies of vaccines in children and adults. We conduct immunology studies of seasonal influenza vaccines in twins, in a longitudinal cohort of young and elderly adults and studies of various vaccine candidates for NIH and industry. Additionally, we were a CDC Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment site for 10 years working on safety issues concerning licensed vaccines.

  • Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    Director, Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance at Stanford, James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering, Professor of Bioengineering, of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental and computational approaches to study human movement. Development of biomechanical models to analyze muscle function, study movement abnormalities, design medical products, and guide surgery. Imaging and health technology development. Discovering the principles of peak performance to advance human health. Human performance research. Wearable technologies, video motion capture, and machine learning to enable large-scale analysis.

  • Manisha Desai (She/Her/Hers)

    Manisha Desai (She/Her/Hers)

    Li Family Endowed Professor, Professor (Research) of Medicine (Quantitative Sciences Unit), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Desai is the Director of the Quantitative Sciences Unit. She is interested in the application of biostatistical methods to all areas of medicine including oncology, nephrology, and endocrinology. She works on methods for the analysis of epidemiologic studies, clinical trials, and studies with missing observations.

  • Tushar Desai

    Tushar Desai

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBasic and translational research in lung stem cell biology, cancer, pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, and acute lung injury/ARDS. Upper airway stem cell CRISPR gene correction followed by autologous stem cell transplantation to treat Cystic fibrosis. Using lung organoids and precision cut lung slice cultures of mouse and human lungs to study molecular regulation of lung stem cells. Using transgenic mice to visualize Wnt protein transmission from niche cell to stem cell in vivo.

  • Chitra Dinakar

    Chitra Dinakar

    Member, Maternal & Child Health Research Institute (MCHRI)

    BioDr. Chitra Dinakar is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at Stanford University and the Clinical Chief of Allergy, Asthma and Immunodeficiency, Stanford Health Care. Prior to coming to Stanford she was a Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City; and Director, Food Allergy Center at Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City. She completed her fellowship in Allergy/Immunology (A/I) at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio, and her residency in pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University/Metrohealth Medical Center, Ohio. She completed her medical school and pediatric residency training at JIPMER, a premier medical institution in India.

    Having had the benefit of experiencing health care in diverse settings, Dr. Dinakar is empowered with the perspective, and driven by the passion, to improve health care across the globe. Her interests and expertise include food allergies, asthma, and health care disparities, delivery, and outcomes. She serves on the editorial boards of four reputed Allergy/Immunology journals and the World Allergy Organization Web Editorial Board. She has been involved in more than 50 multi-centered, clinical trials relating to asthma and food allergies, and has over 100 peer-reviewed publications and research abstracts in prestigious journals.

    One of her current research interests is ASIAd (Allergy/Asthma Studies in Individuals of Asian Descent), that explores the Care, Cure and Prevention of Allergic conditions in individuals of Asian lineage. As part of the exploration she is collaborating with researchers from Northwestern University to study the unique food allergens prevalent in the South Asian population (please click on link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SouthAsianFoodAllergySurvey). She hopes to address the significant knowledge gaps and unmet needs regarding diagnostic, treatment and preventive options available to this demographic group. Another current area of focus is development of tools to improve patient outcomes in food allergic disorders; she recently received a grant to support phase I of the project. Her other ongoing research interests include the health impact of e-cigarettes, clinical intervention trials and outcomes research in asthma, and use of e-health to improve patient outcomes.

    She is an invited speaker at national and international allergy conferences, and serves on the Board of Directors at national A/I organizations [American Board of A/I; American Academy of A/I; Joint A/I Task Force on Practice Parameters; American Academy of Pediatrics Section of A/I]. Dr. Dinakar’s honors include the following national awards: ”Distinguished Fellow", "Woman in Allergy", “Acellus Teacher of the Year”, "Award of Excellence", and an honorary “Kentucky Colonel” awarded by the Governor of Kentucky, “Best Doctors in America”, and “Kansas City SuperDocs”.

  • Jun Ding

    Jun Ding

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeural circuits of movement control in health and movement disorders

  • Elizabeth DiRenzo, PhD

    Elizabeth DiRenzo, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Music

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Erickson DiRenzo's laboratory integrates research techniques from the basic and clinical sciences to improve the prevention and management of voice disorders.

  • Amy D. Dobberfuhl, MD, MS

    Amy D. Dobberfuhl, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Dobberfuhl's current clinical practice includes: Pelvic Reconstruction, Neurourology, and Voiding Dysfunction. A large proportion of Dr. Dobberfuhl's Voiding Dysfunction practice includes Bladder Pain Syndrome (BPS) and Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (PFD).

  • Dylan Dodd

    Dylan Dodd

    Assistant Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHarnessing the gut microbiome to treat human disease.

  • David Drover

    David Drover

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsField of clinical pharmacology. This involves analysis of what the body does to a drug (pharmacokinetics) and how exactly a specific drug affects the body (pharmacodynamics). His research starts at the level of new drug development with detailed analysis of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a medication.

  • Maurice L. Druzin

    Maurice L. Druzin

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAntepartum and intrapartum fetal monitoring Prenatal diagnosis Medical complications of pregnancy, particularly: SLE, hypertension, diabetes, malignancy A.

  • Justin Du Bois

    Justin Du Bois

    Henry Dreyfus Professor of Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology
    On Leave from 04/01/2022 To 06/30/2022

    BioResearch and Scholarship

    Research in the Du Bois laboratory spans reaction methods development, natural product synthesis, and chemical biology, and draws on expertise in molecular design, molecular recognition, and physical organic chemistry. An outstanding goal of our program has been to develop C–H bond functionalization processes as general methods for organic chemistry, and to demonstrate how such tools can impact the logic of chemical synthesis. A second area of interest focuses on the role of ion channels in electrical conduction and the specific involvement of channel subtypes in the sensation of pain. This work is enabled in part through the advent of small molecule modulators of channel function.

    The Du Bois group has described new tactics for the selective conversion of saturated C–H to C–N and C–O bonds. These methods have general utility in synthesis, making possible the single-step incorporation of nitrogen and oxygen functional groups and thus simplifying the process of assembling complex molecules. To date, lab members have employed these versatile oxidation technologies to prepare natural products that include manzacidin A and C, agelastatin, tetrodotoxin, and saxitoxin. Detailed mechanistic studies of metal-catalyzed C–H functionalization reactions are performed in parallel with process development and chemical synthesis. These efforts ultimately give way to advances in catalyst design. A long-standing goal of this program is to identify robust catalyst systems that afford absolute control of reaction selectivity.

    In a second program area, the Du Bois group is exploring voltage-gated ion channel structure and function using the tools of chemistry in combination with those of molecular biology, electrophysiology, microscopy and mass spectrometry. Much of this work has focused on studies of eukaryotic Na and Cl ion channels. The Du Bois lab is interested in understanding the biochemical mechanisms that underlie channel subtype regulation and how such processes may be altered following nerve injury. Small molecule toxins serve as lead compounds for the design of isoform-selective channel modulators, affinity reagents, and fluorescence imaging probes. Access to toxins and modified forms thereof (including saxitoxin, gonyautoxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) through de novo synthesis drives studies to elucidate toxin-receptor interactions and to develop new pharmacologic tools to study ion channel function in primary cells and murine pain models.

  • Dawn Duane

    Dawn Duane

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Operations

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a general pediatric neurologist. My interest is in clinical diagnosis and treatment of common neurologic diseases in pediatric patients and teaching feature doctors, neurologists and pediatric neurologists about pediatric neurology.

  • Anne Dubin

    Anne Dubin

    Professor of Pediatrics (Pediatric Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsArrhythmia management in pediatric heart failure, especially resynchronization therapy in congenital heart disease,Radio frequency catheter ablation of pediatric arrhythmias,

  • Sarah E. Dubner

    Sarah E. Dubner

    Instructor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Dubner seeks to understand how early-life experiences impact children's developing brain connections in order to design interventions to promote healthy developmental trajectories. Current projects include 1. perinatal inflammation in brain white matter microstructure and neurodevelopmental outcomes in children born preterm, and 2. parental social network interventions to promote language health in children at risk for language delays.

  • Alexander Dunn

    Alexander Dunn

    Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is deeply interested in uncovering the physical principles that underlie the construction of complex, multicellular animal life.

  • James Dunn

    James Dunn

    Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIntestinal lengthening for short bowel syndrome
    Intestinal stem cell therapy for intestinal failure
    Skin derived precursor cell therapy for enteric neuromuscular dysfunction
    Intestinal tissue engineering

  • Ram S Duriseti

    Ram S Duriseti

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    BioRam's Doctoral background and academic interests are in in computational modeling of complex decisions, algorithm design and implementation, and data driven decision making. Outside of clinical work, his main competencies in this regard are software development, algorithm design and implementation, cost-effectiveness analysis, decision analysis through computational models. He has also collaborated with industry to create and deploy operation specific software involving statistical computing and reasoning under inference. He has been practicing clinical Emergency Medicine in both community and academic settings for over 20 years. At Stanford, he primarily works in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    https://www.shiftgen.com/about
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/ram-duriseti-991614/

  • John Eaton

    John Eaton

    Charles Lee Powell Foundation Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioEaton uses experiments and computational simulations to study the flow and heat transfer in complex turbulent flows, especially those relevant to turbomachinery, particle-laden flows, and separated flows, and to develop new techniques for precise control of gas and surface temperature during manufacturing processes.

  • Noelle Hanako Ebel

    Noelle Hanako Ebel

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent projects include:
    -indications for combined heart-liver transplantation
    -mitigating perioperative bleeding during cardiac surgery in children with Alagille syndrome
    -congenital heart disease and liver transplantation
    -subspecialty advocacy