School of Medicine


Showing 101-142 of 142 Results

  • Benjamin Pulli, MD

    Benjamin Pulli, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology
    Clinical Assistant Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Pulli is a dual fellowship trained diagnostic and interventional neuroradiologist with a focus on vascular disorders of the brain, head, neck, and spine. He is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Division.

    Having grown up in Austria, Dr. Pulli moved to the US after completing medical school in Innsbruck, Austria. He completed post-doctoral research training in stroke imaging in the Division of Neuroradiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital, as well as in experimental molecular imaging techniques of neuroinflammatory disorders at the Center for Systems Biology of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

    He completed residency training in Radiology and fellowship training in Diagnostic Neuroradiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He then completed a second fellowship in interventional neuroradiology/neurointerventional surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    After having graduated from fellowship, Dr. Pulli then spent more than a year practicing Interventional Neuroradiology at Pacific Neuroscience Institute in Los Angeles. He employs state-of-the-art minimally invasive endovascular and percutaneous surgical techniques to treat patients with brain aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, dural arteriovenous fistulas, carotid artery stenosis, acute stroke, chronic subdural hematoma, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, vascular tumors, and chronic back pain.

    His research focuses on advanced imaging techniques for acute ischemic stroke and other neurovascular diseases. He has authored more than 40 peer-reviewed publications and received scientific grants from institutions such as the Radiological Society of North America and the Ernst Schering Foundation. In addition, he has made invited presentations to his peers at meetings of organizations such as the American Society of Neuroradiology, Radiological Society of North American, European Congress of Radiology, and Western Neuroradiological Society.

    He is a member of the Society of Neurointerventional Surgery.

  • Xiang Qian

    Xiang Qian

    Stanford Medicine Endowed Director
    Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Interests
    -Pain Medicine:
    Facial pain
    Migraine and headache
    Trigeminal Neuralgia and Glossopharyngeal neuralgia
    Cancer Pain
    Spine Disease
    Neuropathic pain
    Interventional Surgery
    CT guided Procedure
    Opioid Management

    -Facial Nerve neuralgia and neuropathy
    Hemifacial Spasm
    CT guided awake RFA of facial nerve

    Research Interests:
    -Medical device development
    -AI based headache diagnosis and management
    -CT guided intervention
    -Intra-nasal endoscopy guided procedure
    -Optogenetics
    -Mechanisms of neuropathic pain
    -Ion channel and diseases
    -Neurotoxicity of anesthetics

  • Ashwin Ramayya, MD, PhD

    Ashwin Ramayya, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Ramayya is an assistant professor in the Department of Neurosurgery. He specializes in the treatment of patients with chronic pain, movement disorders, epilepsy, and traumatic brain injury. His research program will focus on understanding brain mechanisms underlying pain experience and how to alleviate pain using brain stimulation.

    Dr. Ramayya specializes in neuromodulation, including deep brain stimulation (DBS), spinal cord stimulation, MRI-guided laser therapy, and focused ultrasound. Dr. Ramayya obtained his MD and PhD from the University of Pennsylvania, where he also completed his neurosurgery residency and a fellowship in stereotactic and functional neurosurgery.

    His research efforts have identified neural substrates underlying learning, memory, and decision-making using computational behavioral modeling, neurophysiology, and neuroimaging.

    Dr. Ramayya has published in numerous peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Neuroscience, NeuroImage, and Cerebral Cortex. He has also presented his work at national and international meetings, including those for the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Pan Philadelphia Neurosurgery Conference.

  • John Ratliff, MD, FACS

    John Ratliff, MD, FACS

    Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests focus upon preventing complications in spine surgery, assessing patient outcomes after spine surgery procedures, and developing population-based metrics for assessing surgical outcomes.

  • Lawrence Recht, MD

    Lawrence Recht, MD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory focuses on two interrelated projects: (1) assessment of glioma development within the framework of the multistage model of carcinogenesis through utilization of the rodent model of ENU neurocarcinogenesis; and (2) assessment of stem cell specification and pluripotency using an embryonic stem cell model system in which neural differentiation is induced.

  • Nidhi Rohatgi, MD MS

    Nidhi Rohatgi, MD MS

    Clinical Professor, Medicine
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioNidhi Rohatgi, MD, MS, SFHM is a Clinical Professor of Medicine and Section Chief for Surgical Co-management (Neurosurgery, Orthopedic surgery, and ENT) in the Division of Hospital Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. She primarily manages medical co-morbidities and strives to prevent medical complications in post-surgical patients in the hospital setting. She has led several quality improvement and clinical research studies and is passionate about finding innovative, cost-efficient and sustainable solutions in healthcare. She serves as an investigator in NIH and industry sponsored clinical trials and is the Director of Clinical Research (Palo Alto) in the Division of Hospital Medicine and an Affiliated Faculty at the Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine and Imaging at Stanford University. She is an invited speaker at national and international meetings and serves on several national committees. She is the recipient of local, national, and international awards for her work as a clinician, educator, and researcher. She is a strong advocate for patient experience and serves as the Medical Director for the Clinical Advice Services at Stanford Health Care.

  • Sarada Sakamuri, MD

    Sarada Sakamuri, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Sarada Sakamuri specializes in neuromuscular medicine. Her interests are peripheral nerve injury, neuromuscular ultrasound, EMG/NCS, and neurogenetic disorders. Her other passion is graduate medical education.

    She graduated from Rutgers University with Phi Beta Kappa distinction and a degree in psychology. She attended Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, NJ, where she led multiple community service and medical education activities and was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha and Gold Humanism Honor Societies. She moved to the Bay Area to pursue neurology residency at Stanford, where she later served as chief resident. She then completed two years of fellowship in EMG/Clinical Neurophysiology and Neuromuscular Medicine and research training at Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research Center.

    Dr. Sakamuri's passion is neuromuscular medicine, with a focus on peripheral nerve traumas and disorders. She is Co-Director of the Center for Peripheral Nerve Surgery along with neurosurgeon Dr. Thomas J. Wilson. She performs advanced evaluations of peripheral nerve conditions by integrating nerve and muscle ultrasound and neurophysiologic testing (EMG/NCS) at the bedside. She has advanced training in nerve and muscle ultrasound, and sits on the Neuromuscular Ultrasound Committee of the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM).

    She is board-certified in Neurology and in Neuromuscular disorders by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN). She is certified in EMG/NCS by the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (ABEM), and holds a Certificate of Added Qualification in Neuromuscular Ultrasound.

    Dr. Sakamuri's other passion is graduate medical education. She is the Program Director of the Stanford Neuromuscular Medicine Fellowship and Associate Director of the Clinical Neurophysiology/EMG Fellowship, with a total of five ACGME-accredited positions filled by extremely bright and talented fellows. She supervises a weekly neurology resident continuity clinic and enjoys teaching medical students and neurology and physiatry residents and fellows. She been awarded the Lysia S. Forno Award for outstanding contributions to resident teaching.

  • Robert Sapolsky

    Robert Sapolsky

    John A. and Cynthia Fry Gunn Professor, Professor of Biology, of Neurology and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeuron death, stress, gene therapy

  • Mark J. Schnitzer

    Mark J. Schnitzer

    Professor of Biology, of Applied Physics and of Neurosurgery (Adult Neurosurgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of our research is to advance experimental paradigms for understanding normal cognitive and disease processes at the level of neural circuits, with emphasis on learning and memory processes. To advance these paradigms, we invent optical brain imaging techniques, several of which have been widely adopted. Our neuroscience studies combine these imaging innovations with behavioral, electrophysiological, optogenetic and computational methods, enabling a holistic approach to brain science.

  • Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical interests involve inpatient and outpatient care of patients with neurovascular diseases, mostly ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. I have a particular interest in cervical artery dissection, non-atherosclerotic vasculopathies, and stroke in the young.

  • Mehrdad Shamloo

    Mehrdad Shamloo

    Professor (Research) of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe ultimate goal of the Shamloo laboratory is to rapidly advance our understanding of brain function at the molecular, cellular, circuit and behavioral levels, and to elucidate the pathological process underlying malfunction of the nervous system following injury and neurologic disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson’s disease, and autism. We have been focusing on the noradrenergic system and approaches leading to restoration of brain adrenergic signaling in these disorders.

  • Lawrence Shuer, MD

    Lawrence Shuer, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have clinical research interests in the surgical treatment of epilepsy. I am also interested in new developments in the treatment of craniosynostosis a congenital abnormality of infant's skulls

  • Gerald Silverberg

    Gerald Silverberg

    Professor of Neurosurgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAge-related changes in the blood-brain barrier (BBB)and on CSF dynsmics decrease the clearance of toxic metabolites, such as amyloid beta peptides (A-betas), from the brain. I am studing the effects of aging and hydrocephalus on the BBB receptors that transport A-betas and on the formation and bulk flow of CSF.

  • Harminder Singh, M.D.

    Harminder Singh, M.D.

    Clinical Professor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMinimally Invasive Cranial and Spinal Surgery, Endoscopic Keyhole Surgery

  • Stephen Skirboll

    Stephen Skirboll

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on screening strategies to identify and characterize cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human gliomas. We are pursuing this in several ways: 1) a novel colony-forming antibody live cell array to identify distinct CSC surface phenotypes, 2) RNAi screens to identify kinases critical for CSC tumorigenicity, 3) high throughput small molecule and chemical screens to identify compounds that selectively kill or target CSCs, and 4) identifying CSCs using the tumor specific EGFRvIII

  • Ivan Soltesz

    Ivan Soltesz

    James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences

    BioIvan Soltesz received his doctorate in Budapest and conducted postdoctoral research at universities at Oxford, London, Stanford and Dallas. He established his laboratory at the University of California, Irvine, in 1995. He became full Professor in 2003, and served as department Chair from 2006 to July 2015. He returned to Stanford in 2015 as the James R. Doty Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. His major research interest is focused on neuronal microcircuits, network oscillations, cannabinoid signaling and the mechanistic bases of circuit dysfunction in epilepsy.
    His laboratory employs a combination of closely integrated experimental and theoretical techniques, including closed-loop in vivo optogenetics, paired patch clamp recordings, in vivo electrophysiological recordings from identified interneurons in awake mice, 2-photon imaging, machine learning-aided 3D video analysis of behavior, video-EEG recordings, behavioral approaches, and large-scale computational modeling methods using supercomputers. He is the author of a book on GABAergic microcircuits (Diversity in the Neuronal Machine, Oxford University Press), and editor of a book on Computational Neuroscience in Epilepsy (Academic Press/Elsevier). He co-founded the first Gordon Research Conference on the Mechanisms of neuronal synchronization and epilepsy, and taught for five years in the Ion Channels Course at Cold Springs Harbor. He has over 30 years of research experience, with over 20 years as a faculty involved in the training of graduate students (total of 16, 6 of them MD/PhDs) and postdoctoral fellows (20), many of whom received fellowship awards, K99 grants, joined prestigious residency programs and became independent faculty.

  • Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Scott G. Soltys, MD

    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical and research interests focus on the development of new radiation techniques involving stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of malignant and benign tumors of the brain and spine, as well as functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia.

  • Konstantina M. Stankovic, MD, PhD, FACS

    Konstantina M. Stankovic, MD, PhD, FACS

    Bertarelli Foundation Professor and Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur investigative efforts are organized along 3 research thrusts:
    1. Vestibular schwannoma: uncovering mechanisms of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and identifying better therapies;
    2. High-resolution imaging of the inner ear;
    3. Novel sensing of and therapies for SNHL.
    Given the complex, multifaceted nature of these problems, our approach to them involves domain-specific customization and fusion of tools from molecular biology, systems neuroscience, biotechnology and otologic surgery.

  • Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Gary K. Steinberg, MD, PhD

    Bernard and Ronni Lacroute-William Randolph Hearst Professor of Neurosurgery and Neurosciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory investigates the pathophysiology and treatment of cerebral ischemia, and methods to restore neurologic function after stroke. Treatment strategies include brain hypothermia, stem cell transplantation and optogenetic stimulation. Our clinical research develops innovative surgical, endovascular and radiosurgical approaches for treating difficult intracranial aneurysms, complex vascular malformations and occlusive disease, including Moyamoya disease, as well as stem cell transplant.

  • Thomas Sudhof

    Thomas Sudhof

    Avram Goldstein Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInformation transfer at synapses mediates information processing in brain, and is impaired in many brain diseases. Thomas Südhof is interested in how synapses are formed, how presynaptic terminals release neurotransmitters at synapses, and how synapses become dysfunctional in diseases such as autism or Alzheimer's disease. To address these questions, Südhof's laboratory employs approaches ranging from biophysical studies to the electrophysiological and behavioral analyses of mutant mice.

  • Peter Tass

    Peter Tass

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Peter Tass investigates and develops neuromodulation techniques for understanding and treating neurologic conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, dysfunction following stroke and tinnitus. He creates invasive and non-invasive therapeutic procedures by means of comprehensive computational neuroscience studies and advanced data analysis techniques. The computational neuroscience studies guide experiments that use clinical electrophysiology measures, such as high density EEG recordings and MRI imaging, and various outcome measures. He has pioneered a neuromodulation approach based on thorough computational modelling that employs dynamic self-organization, plasticity and other neuromodulation principles to produce sustained effects after stimulation. To investigate stimulation effects and disease-related brain activity, he focuses on the development of stimulation methods that cause a sustained neural desynchronization by an unlearning of abnormal synaptic interactions. He also performs and contributes to pre-clinical and clinical research in related areas.

  • Nicholas Telischak

    Nicholas Telischak

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Nick Telischak is a neurointerventional surgeon (neurointerventional radiologist) who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of stroke, brain aneurysms, brain arteriovenous malformations, brain and spinal dural arteriovenous fistulae, carotid artery stenosis, vertebral body compression fractures, spinal metastases, axial back pain, and congenital vascular malformations. Dr. Telischak treats all of these conditions using minimally-invasive, image-guided procedures and state-of-the-art technology.

  • Suzanne Tharin

    Suzanne Tharin

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery
    On Partial Leave from 10/16/2023 To 02/28/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long-term goal of my research is the repair of damaged corticospinal circuitry. Therapeutic regeneration strategies will be informed by an understanding both of corticospinal motor neuron (CSMN) development and of events occurring in CSMN in the setting of spinal cord injury. MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of “suites” of genes. The work in my lab seeks to identify microRNA controls over CSMN development and over the CSMN response to spinal cord injury.

  • Reena Thomas, MD PhD

    Reena Thomas, MD PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests-Neuro Oncology Immunotherapy
    -Health Equity
    -Medical Education

  • Zachary David Threlkeld

    Zachary David Threlkeld

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Threlkeld cares for critically ill patients with acute neurologic illness, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and epilepsy. He completed his residency training in neurology at the University of California, San Francisco, and joined the Stanford Neurocritical Care program after completing fellowship training in neurocritical care at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He has a particular clinical and research interest in traumatic brain injury. His research uses advanced imaging modalities like functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to better understand disorders of consciousness.

  • Maxine Umeh Garcia

    Maxine Umeh Garcia

    Instructor, Neurosurgery

    BioMaxine was born and raised in Sacramento, CA and transferred to UC Merced in 2007 after attending a community college for 2 years. She received her B.S. in Developmental Biology with a minor in Psychology in 2010. During the last year of her undergrad, Maxine was invited to do research in the lab of Dr. Michael Cleary, studying nervous system development. Because of this research experience, Maxine decided to stay at UC Merced to pursue her Master’s in Quantitative and Systems Biology, graduating in 2013. Immediately after graduating, she started her Ph.D. at UC Davis, where her research centered on triple negative breast cancer – a type of breast cancer that has a high incidence in Black and African women.

    After completing her PhD in Biochemistry, Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology with an emphasis in Translational Research in 2019, Maxine became a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University in the department of Neurosurgery. Dr. Umeh Garcia’s research focuses on breast cancers that metastasize (or travel) to the brain. Maxine was recently promoted to an instructor position in her department after receiving a major career development award from the National Cancer Institute (K99/R00), which will fund the remainder of her postdoctoral research and provide 3 years of funding for Maxine to establish her own independent research lab. Using her background in bench research, informatics, and translational research, Dr. Umeh Garcia hopes to bring together biologists, data scientists, and clinicians to make important advances in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. Additionally, as a women and underrepresented minority, Dr. Umeh Garcia is keenly interested in mentoring women and underrepresented students, and in developing novel strategic approaches to increasing diversity in biomedical sciences and academic research.

  • Anand Veeravagu

    Anand Veeravagu

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe focus of my laboratory is to utilize precision medicine techniques to improve the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic conditions. From traumatic brain injury to spinal scoliosis, the ability to capture detailed data regarding clinical symptoms and treatment outcomes has empowered us to do better for patients. Utilize data to do better for patients, that’s what we do.

    Stanford Neurosurgical Ai and Machine Learning Lab
    http://med.stanford.edu/neurosurgery/research/AILab.html

  • Chitra Venkatasubramanian, MBBS, MD, MSc, FNCS

    Chitra Venkatasubramanian, MBBS, MD, MSc, FNCS

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in the study of the radiological characteristics and temporal profile of edema/ tissue injury in the perihematomal area around spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. I am also interested in developing protocols for emergent reversal of anticoagulation in a life-threatening hemorrhage situation.

  • Hannes Vogel MD

    Hannes Vogel MD

    Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics (Pediatric Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, Neurology and of Comparative Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests include nerve and muscle pathology, mitochondrial diseases, pediatric neurooncology, and transgenic mouse pathology.

  • Xinnan Wang

    Xinnan Wang

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMechanisms underlying mitochondrial dynamics and function, and their implications in neurological disorders.

  • Thomas J. Wilson

    Thomas J. Wilson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Thomas J. Wilson was born in Omaha, Nebraska. He attended the University of Nebraska College of Medicine, earning his MD with highest distinction. While a medical student, he was awarded a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Training Fellowship and spent a year in the lab of Dr. Rakesh Singh at the University of Nebraska. He was also elected to the prestigious Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. He completed his residency training in neurological surgery at the University of Michigan and was mentored by Dr. Lynda Yang and Dr. John McGillicuddy in peripheral nerve surgery. Following his residency, he completed a fellowship in peripheral nerve surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, working with Dr. Robert Spinner. He is now Clinical Associate Professor and Co-Director of the Center for Peripheral Nerve Surgery at Stanford University. He also holds a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree from the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, with focused certificates in Clinical Trials and Health Finance and Management. His research interests include peripheral nerve outcomes research, clinical trials advancing options for patients with peripheral nerve pathologies and spinal cord injuries, and translational research focused on improved imaging techniques to assist in diagnosing nerve pain and other peripheral nerve conditions. His clinical practice encompasses the treatment of all peripheral nerve pathologies, including entrapment neuropathies, nerve tumors, nerve injuries (including brachial plexus injuries, upper and lower extremity nerve injuries), and nerve pain. Dr. Wilson enjoys working in multi-disciplinary teams to solve complex problems of the peripheral nervous system. His wife, Dr. Monique Wilson, is a practicing dermatologist in the Bay Area.

  • Albert J. Wong, M.D.

    Albert J. Wong, M.D.

    Professor of Neurosurgery
    On Leave from 01/01/2024 To 05/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur goal is to define targets for cancer therapeutics by identifying alterations in signal transduction proteins. We first identified a naturally occurring mutant EGF receptor (EGFRvIII) and then delineated its unique signal transduction pathway. This work led to the identification of Gab1 followed by the discovery that JNK is constitutively active in tumors. We intiated using altered proteins as the target for vaccination, where an EGFRvIII based vaccine appears to be highly effective.

  • Moss Zhao

    Moss Zhao

    Instructor, Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Moss Zhao is an Instructor at Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University. He develops cutting-edge and clinically viable imaging technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases across the lifespan. His specific areas of expertise include physiological modeling, arterial spin labeling, Bayesian inference, PET/MRI, and artificial intelligence. His scientific contributions could significantly improve the early detection of strokes and dementia as well as enrich the knowledge of brain development in the first two decades of life.

    Dr. Zhao received his DPhil at St Cross College of University of Oxford under the supervision of Prof. Michael Chappell. As an alumni mentor, he supports the career development of students of his alma mater. Since 2016, he has presented his work to more than 3000 delegates at international conferences and held leadership positions in professional societies. His research and teaching are supported by the American Heart Association, the National Institutes of Health, and the European Cooperation in Science and Technology.

  • Quan Zhou

    Quan Zhou

    Instructor, Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent Research Focus: molecular targeted theranostic imaging of brain tumor and enhanced drug delivery

    Areas of Insterests: molecular imaging, theranostics, fluorescence-guided surgery, brain tumor, drug delivery

    Dr. Zhou has made substantial contributions to the growing biomedical research field of Molecular Imaging. Molecular imaging emerged in the mid twentieth century as a highly specialized discipline at the intersection of molecular biology and in vivo imaging, focusing on imaging molecules of medical interest within intact living subjects. Dr. Zhou’s research addresses some of the nation’s most pressing issues related to the development of effective approaches for accurate detection of human diseases and improving their treatment outcome. Her innovations in molecular imaging technology enables the visualization, characterization, and quantification of biologic processes taking place at the cellular and subcellular levels. The multiple and numerous potentialities of Quan’s work are applicable to the diagnosis of diseases such as cancer, neurological and cardiovascular diseases. Her strong education background in biological sciences and biomedical engineering followed by postdoctoral training in translational and clinical research have helped her develop multiple disease-specific molecular probes and imaging strategies for early cancer diagnosis, image-guided surgery, therapeutic delivery prediction and at-risk cardiovascular plaque detection. Her research also contributes to improving the treatment of these disorders by testing and optimizing the execution of new interventions. Her work is expected to have a major economic impact due to earlier disease detection and personalized therapy.

    Dr. Zhou’s research has led to emergence of novel solutions and opportunities, in particular, for molecular imaging of cancer and other diseases, for discovering, leveraging and integration of cancer biomarker and tumor microenvironment information, and for novel approaches to acquire real-time high-resolution contrast enhanced visualization of tumor margin and optimization based on imaging depth, quality and speed. Dr. Zhou has been able to formulate the involved clinical and biological problems into biomedical engineering frameworks and find ways to exploit a variety of modern techniques and approaches from photoacoustic imaging, fluorescence-guided surgery, micro-electromechanical systems and therapeutic delivery strategies in developing elegant and effective solutions. Her work in the Neurosurgery Department and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford involves research related to developing tumor-specific molecular probes, advanced imaging methods and therapeutic delivery systems for adult and pediatric patients with malignant brain cancers to improve margin detection, enhance resection accuracy, and improve treatment outcome.

  • J. Bradley Zuchero

    J. Bradley Zuchero

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are primarily focused on understanding myelinating glia (oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells). How is myelin formed, dynamically remodeled to support learning, and why does regeneration of myelin fail in disease? We are also interested in understanding novel roles of myelin in the nervous system, beyond its textbook role as an electrical insulator. We combine in vivo and primary culture models with the generation of new cell biology tools to answer these questions.

  • Corinna Zygourakis, MD

    Corinna Zygourakis, MD

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy goal is to translate research into real-world action and decision-making so that my work can impact patients and the institutions in which they receive care. With a research focus on healthcare cost and quality of care, I approach neurosurgery in a unique way—one that applies business operations, economics, and healthcare delivery principles to our field. I have pursued formal LEAN business training, and believe in the importance of working together with other departments and administrators, as well as physicians and surgeons on the hospital and national level, to effect change. During my residency, I developed and led a multi-departmental prospective study at UCSF called OR SCORE (OR Surgical Cost Reduction Project) that brought together surgeons from the neurosurgery, orthopedics and ENT departments with nurses and administrators. OR SCORE successfully reduced surgical supply costs by nearly one million dollars in its first year by providing >60 surgeons with price transparency scorecards. This work led to a first-author publication in JAMA Surgery, but more importantly, set the foundation for further quality improvement and cost reduction efforts across the UCSF hospital system.

    A volunteer neurosurgical mission trip to Guadalajara, Mexico, where limited resources create an OR environment that is strikingly more frugal than the U.S., inspired me to lead another project aimed at quantifying and reducing operating room waste at UCSF. I have also conducted research looking at the safety and outcomes of overlapping surgery, as well as several projects to define the factors underlying variation in cost for neurosurgical care using UCSF’s hospital data and national databases like the National Inpatient Sample, Vizient (formerly known as University Health Consortium), and Medicare.

    As a clinical fellow at Johns Hopkins, I continued and expanded these research efforts. I designed and implemented an Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS) protocol at the Johns Hopkins Bayview hospital. This protocol standardized care for our spine patients, emphasizing pre-operative rehabilitation, psychiatric and nutritional assessments, and smoking cessation, as well as intra- and post-operative multi-modal pain therapy, early mobilization, and standardized antibiotic and bowel regimens. I also collaborated with engineers in the Johns Hopkins Carnegie Center for Surgical Innovation to develop better algorithms for intra-operative CT imaging, and provided assistance with operations to a basic science study looking at the role of cerebrospinal fluid drainage and duraplasty in a porcine model of spinal cord injury.

    At Stanford, I am building a research group focused on: (1) perfecting paradigms for delivery of high-end technology in spinal care, including robotics and navigation, (2) implementing cost and quality strategies in large healthcare systems, and (3) computational analysis of big-data to effect real-time risk stratification and decision making in spine surgery. I'm excited to collaborate with my peers across surgical and medical departments, as well as business and engineering colleagues.