School of Medicine


Showing 21-40 of 57 Results

  • Philip Grant

    Philip Grant

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioMy research focuses on antiretroviral therapy and complications of HIV including immune reconstitution inflammatory disease, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease.

  • Dora Ho

    Dora Ho

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Ho did her PhD work in HSV pathogenesis and postdoctoral research in CNS gene therapy with viral vectors. She is currently the clinical chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine. She specializes in infection complications of immunocompromised patients, such as those with cancers, solid organ transplant or bone marrow transplant.

  • Mark Holodniy

    Mark Holodniy

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research program is currently focused in three areas: 1) Translational research (viral evolution and antiviral resistance prevalence and development), 2) Clinical trials (diagnostic assay/medical device, antimicrobials and immunomodulators), and 3) Health services research focusing on public health, infectious diseases and clinical outcomes.

  • Marisa Holubar

    Marisa Holubar

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Marisa Holubar specializes in the treatment of infectious diseases and works primarily in the inpatient setting. She is particularly interested in antimicrobial stewardship.

  • Prasanna Jagannathan

    Prasanna Jagannathan

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    BioI am an Infectious Diseases physician-scientist with a research program in human immunology of malaria and clinical trials of immune modulatory interventions. Our group has been conducting detailed longitudinal cohort studies in children and pregnant women in order to study how repeated malaria shapes the cellular immune response. We are also studying how malaria control interventions such as antimalarial chemoprevention and vector control shape the acquisition and/or maintenance of protective immunity to malaria. We have expanded this work to not only include studying the mechanisms driving naturally acquired immunity to malaria, but other infectious diseases, including SARS CoV-2. We have also lead and/or participated in studies evaluating therapeutic strategies for patients with mild to moderate COVID-19.

  • Shanthi Kappagoda

    Shanthi Kappagoda

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCompleted a Masters degree in Health Services Research in 2012. Research focused on using network models to develop a clinical research agenda for neglected tropical diseases.

  • Michael Kozal

    Michael Kozal

    Senior Associate Dean for Veterans Affairs and Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    BioDr. Kozal was appointed Senior Associate Dean for Veteran Affairs at Stanford School of Medicine and Chief of Staff at VA Palo Alto Health Care System in 2021. Prior to coming to Stanford, he served as Associate Dean for Veteran Affairs at Yale University School of Medicine and the Chief of Staff at VA Connecticut Healthcare System.

    Dr. Kozal is a translational researcher who has focused his research career on three areas: 1) investigating the genetic determinants of HIV and HCV drug resistance, 2) the development of new molecular methods to detect viral mutations, and 3) HIV and HCV clinical trials involving new drugs and diagnostic technology. Dr. Kozal is an expert in microarray and deep sequencing technology receiving patents for his work in genotyping. Dr. Kozal previously directed the Yale HIV Clinical Trials Group and has more than 20 years of experience in running clinical trials, serving as the principal investigator or site investigator on >40 HIV and Hepatitis C trials. He has served on multiple VA and NIH/NCI review panels and is a current a member of the DHHS/NIH Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents.

  • Nathan Lo

    Nathan Lo

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research laboratory is interested in studying the transmission of infectious diseases and impact of public health interventions with an ultimate goal of informing public health policy. We study a diverse set of pathogens, both domestically and internationally, including vaccine-preventable infections (including COVID-19) and neglected parasitic diseases (such as schistosomiasis). Our group applies diverse computational methodologies, including tools from fields of epidemiology, mathematical and statistical modeling, simulation, and policy analysis.

    A large emphasis of our work is translating scientific evidence into public health policy. Our track record includes multiple studies that have changed policy in the fields of neglected parasitic diseases and COVID-19. We work closely with policy organizations like the World Health Organization and the California Department of Public Health. Nathan served as the lead writer of the World Health Organization guidelines on schistosomiasis (2022) and strongyloidiasis.

    Our current research focuses on the following areas:
    (1) Vaccine-preventable infectious diseases (including COVID-19) in the United States, with a focus on studying vaccines and transmission dynamics
    (2) Public health strategies for control and elimination of globally important neglected infectious diseases, such as helminths infections (schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis) and typhoid fever

    Hiring
    We are seeking to fill multiple research positions at all levels. Candidates interested in working on computational public health research related to infectious diseases with a strong quantitative background are highly encouraged to apply. If you an interested, please submit a cover letter, CV, and names of two references to Nathan.Lo@stanford.edu.

  • Stephen Luby

    Stephen Luby

    Lucy Becker Professor of Medicine, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Luby’s research interests include identifying and interrupting pathways of infectious disease transmission in low income countries.

  • Natalia Medvedeva

    Natalia Medvedeva

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr Natalia Medvedeva specializes in the treatment of infectious diseases. She has a special interest in antimicrobial stewardship and medical education.

  • Thomas Charles Merigan M.D.

    Thomas Charles Merigan M.D.

    George E. and Lucy Becker Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am now emeritus and only participate in university activities through advising my former trainees who have joined the faculty.

  • Joanna Nelson

    Joanna Nelson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Nelson is a board certified Infectious Disease specialist. She specializes in the treatment of immunocompromised patients, including patients who have had solid organ or bone marrow transplantation or who have malignancy undergoing chemotherapy. She also has a special interest in caring for patients with Cystic fibrosis or who have had a lung transplant as well as Nontuberculous mycobacterial Infections.

  • Andrew Nevins

    Andrew Nevins

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical general infectious diseases. Medical education.

  • Julie Parsonnet

    Julie Parsonnet

    George DeForest Barnett Professor of Medicine and Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am an infectious diseases epidemiologist who has done large field studies in both the US and developing countries. We research the long-term consequences of chronic interactions between the human host and the microbial world. My lab has done fundamental work establishing the role of H. pylori in causing disease and understanding its epidemiology. Currently, our research dissects how and when children first encounter microbes and the long term effects of these exposures on health.

  • Benjamin Pinsky

    Benjamin Pinsky

    Professor of Pathology, of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment and application of molecular assays for the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases.

  • Orlando Quintero, MD

    Orlando Quintero, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Orlando Quintero is a board-certified, fellowship trained internist specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. He is also clinical assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    As a clinician, Dr. Quintero diagnoses and treats infectious diseases in immunocompromised patients. This includes the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of infections in patients who are immunosuppressed because of Solid Organ Transplantation, Bone Marrow (Hematopoeitic Cell) Transplants, Hematologic Malignancies, Chemotherapy for Solid Tumors, HIV who receive Chemotherapy, Solid Organ or Bone Marrow Transplants Immunomodulators for Auto-Immune Diseases and other forms of immunodeficiency.

    Dr. Quintero has published on topics including coronavirus in kidney transplant patients, prevention of cytomegalovirus in heart transplant patients, and prevention of urinary tract infections in renal transplant patients. His work has appeared in publications including Transplant Infectious Disease, Emerging Infectious Diseases, and the Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation.

    He has delivered presentations at meetings of organizations including the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation, Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, and American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Topics of his presentations have included prevention of cytomegalovirus, prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections, Chagas disease in New York City, and more.

    Currently, Dr. Quintero is conducting research on treatment of patients with COVID-19, prevention and treatment of invasive fungal infections of the gastrointestinal tract in immunocompromised patients, and the epidemiology of invasive fungal infections in heart transplant recipients.

    Among his awards, He has received honors for his teaching and research from Albert Einstein College. He also has earned recognition from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the American Society of Transplantation.

    Dr. Quintero’s volunteer community service includes participation in health fairs to promote HIV testing and hypertension control, plus disease management in the Garifuna population in New York – descendants of an Afro-indigenous population from the Caribbean island of St. Vincent.

    He is a member of the Infectious Disease Society of American, Infectious Diseases Association of California, American Society of Transplantation, and HIV Medicine Association.

  • David A. Relman

    David A. Relman

    Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
    On Partial Leave from 04/29/2024 To 10/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy investigative program focuses on human-microbe interactions and human microbial ecology, and primarily concerns the ecology of human indigenous microbial communities; a secondary interest concerns the classification of humans with systemic infectious diseases, based on features of genome-wide gene transcript abundance patterns and pther aspects of the host response.

  • Cybele A. Renault, MD, DTM&H, FIDSA

    Cybele A. Renault, MD, DTM&H, FIDSA

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Renault has devoted her career to caring for vulnerable patient populations, both domestically and overseas. She completed her medical school and residency training at the University of Chicago, caring for underserved patients on Chicago's South Side, followed by a Chief Resident year at John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County, the public hospital serving the uninsured in Chicago. She began her career in global health as an Infectious Diseases fellow at Stanford, validating low-cost HIV diagnostics in Burkina Faso, and providing clinical service and teaching in India and Zimbabwe as a fellow, and later in Thailand, Uganda, Rwanda and Kenya as one of our Infectious Diseases faculty. Her clinical work is focused on caring for our veteran population, working to empower veterans to engage in their care, often in the setting of significant mental illness.

    Dr. Renault is most passionate about medical education and program development to combat global antimicrobial resistance through antimicrobial stewardship, to create opportunities for the Internal Medicine residents centering on caring for vulnerable patient populations, and to develop impactful and sustainable programs in collaboration with our low- and middle-income partners for our Center for Innovation in Global Health. She served as Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency Program for 4 years prior to transitioning to her current role as Program Lead for Global Health, for which she leads the Global Health Track for the Internal Medicine residency program and develops global health initiatives for the Department of Medicine. She co-founded and has been director of the Stanford 2-week intensive global health course since its inception in 2012, she has structured trainee and faculty rotations based on evolving needs of our partner sites in Uganda, Rwanda, Zimbabwe, and Sri Lanka, she is the faculty lead for the ID/antimicrobial stewardship partnership between Stanford and Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret, Kenya through the AMPATH Consortium, and she is leading Stanford's Internal Medicine virtual case-based education initiative to support our newest medical school partner in Negele Arsi, Ethiopia.

    Dr. Renault strives to augment Stanford's contributions and support for underserved patient populations in the United States. She established resident rotations in Shiprock, New Mexico and Chinle, Arizona through the Indian Health Service, and she is Faculty Advisor for the Internal Medicine Health Equity, Advocacy and Research concentration in the residency program. She also aspires to improve resources for women physicians. In 2016, Dr. Renault established the GME Women in Medicine Leadership Council, with the intention of creating community and encouraging conversations about professional and personal life decisions as women in the field of medicine. She is passionate about mentoring through sharing personal experiences, creating an environment that encourages reflection, and building skills to address challenges unique to women in medicine.

    In 2022, in recognition of her passion for medical education and her success in program development, Dr. Renault was asked to join the leadership at Palo Alto Veterans Health Care System as Deputy Associate Chief of Staff for Education. In this role, she works with rotation directors to optimize their respective rotations to offer robust educational opportunities for trainees across specialties who are rotating at the Palo Alto VA.