School of Medicine


Showing 51-100 of 119 Results

  • Norman J. Lacayo, MD

    Norman J. Lacayo, MD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology and Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPediatric Hematology/Oncology, Phase I drug studies for refractory and relapsed leukemia; genomic studies, biologic risk-stratification and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia; prediction or induction response and risk of relapse using phosphoproteomics in childhood AML; novel MRD techniques in childhood ALL.

  • Michael Link

    Michael Link

    Lydia J. Lee Professor of Pediatric Cancer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHematology/Oncology, treatment of sarcomas of bone and soft tissue, biology of acute lymphoblastic leukemias, treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease.

  • Yu-Chen Lo

    Yu-Chen Lo

    Research Data Analyst, Pediatrics - Hematology/Oncology

    BioMy primary research interests are in developing and applying computational approaches to drug discovery, drug design, and target prediction. I have pioneered new computational approaches to determine drug actions based on chemical networks (https://services.mbi.ucla.edu/CSNAP/) and applied this method to discover new drugs inhibiting cell divisions and cancers. My postdoctoral work at Altman lab focuses on developing novel computational methods for predicting drug actions, interactions, side effects and drug repurposing. My current research at Davis lab uses high-parameter single-cell data mining combined with multi-omic integration and systems biology to identify therapeutic targets and drugs for treating pediatric cancers. By correlating low-level structural data with high-level functional biology and clinical outcomes, I will apply system-based approaches to engineer safe and effective medicine for disease treatments.

  • Clara Lo

    Clara Lo

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include:
    Biomarkers and targeted therapy in pediatric immune thrombocytopenia
    Transfusion-related iron overload
    Hemophilia and other rare bleeding disorders
    Thrombophilia

  • Adrienne H. Long, MD, PhD

    Adrienne H. Long, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioAdrienne H. Long, MD, PhD is an instructor in the Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. Dr. Long attend Northwestern University, where she earned both her BS in biomedical engineering and her MD. Determined to help develop novel treatments for pediatric cancer patients, she took time during medical school to pursue a PhD at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), where she helped advance CAR T cell therapies with Dr. Crystal Mackall. Her influential thesis work was the first to identify T cell exhaustion as a critical factor limiting efficacy of CAR therapies (Long et al., Nature Medicine, 2015), and also identified novel methods to enhance CAR therapies for pediatric solid tumor patients (Long/Highfill et al., Cancer Immunology Research, 2016). Dr. Long went on to complete her pediatrics residency training at Boston Children’s Hospital, where she continued her research in cancer immunology with Dr. Nicholas Haining – this time focusing on strategies to enhance antigen presentation to augment checkpoint blockade (Long et al. Keystone Symposium on Cancer Immunotherapy, 2019). She completed her pediatric oncology fellowship at Stanford, and remains dedicated to a career as a physician-scientist focused on developing novel immunotherapies for children with cancer. She is currently conducting her post-doctoral research with Dr. Mark Davis, studying how thymic selection, designed to prevent auto-immunity, may also inhibit antitumor immunity in children.

  • Crystal Mackall

    Crystal Mackall

    Ernest and Amelia Gallo Family Professor and Professor of Pediatrics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRecent clinical studies, by us and others, have demonstrated that genetically engineered T cells can eradicate cancers resistant to all other therapies. We are identifying new targets for these therapeutics, exploring pathways of resistance to current cell therapies and creating next generation platforms to overcome therapeutic resistance. We have discovered novel insights into the biology of human T cell exhaustion and developed approaches to prevent and reverse this phenomenon.

  • Robbie Majzner

    Robbie Majzner

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    BioRobbie Majzner is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Hematology and Oncology. After graduating with a BA from Columbia University, Dr. Majzner attended Harvard Medical School, where he developed an interest in pediatric oncology. He completed his residency training in pediatrics at New York Presbyterian-Columbia and fellowship training in pediatric hematology-oncology at Johns Hopkins and the National Cancer Institute. During his fellowship, he cared for some of the first pediatric patients to receive CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, children with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) who often had no other therapeutic option. Witnessing the success of CAR T cells in these patients drove Dr. Majzner to the laboratory, where he focuses on extending the use of CAR T cells to solid tumors. He has generated and optimized novel receptors to recognize antigens over-expressed on pediatric solid tumors such as GD2 (Mount/Majzner et al., Nature Medicine, 2018) B7-H3 (Majzner et al., Clinical Cancer Research, 2019), and ALK (Walker/Majzner et al., Molecular Therapy, 2017). Current work focuses on imparting multi-specificity to CAR T cells and optimizing these receptors to enhance their efficacy when the amount of target (antigen density) is limiting (Majzner et al., Cancer Discovery, 2020). By drawing on state of the art bioengineering techniques, the Majzner Laboratory focuses on enhancing the potency and specificity of CAR T cells for children with cancer.

    Clinically, Dr. Majzner cares for all patients with neuroblastoma at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and has a specific interest in bringing novel immunotherapies to clinical trials for these patients and those with other solid tumors. He is board certified in pediatrics and pediatric hematology-oncology.

  • Raúl Montiel-Esparza

    Raúl Montiel-Esparza

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other
    Fellow in Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioRaúl Montiel-Esparza, MD is a board-certified pediatrician and clinical fellow in the Division of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, Stem Cell Transplantation, and Regenerative Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Montiel-Esparza grew up in central Mexico and earned his MD with honors from Tecnológico de Monterrey Escuela de Medicina. He completed a postdoctoral research fellowship in cancer immunology in the Luznik Lab at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Montiel-Esparza completed his residency in Pediatrics at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. He has presented his work on Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Graft-versus-Host disease multiple times at national conferences and has several publications and co-authorships. His experiences as a clinician, scientist, and advocate have ultimately inspired him to explore graft engineering strategies in haploidentical stem-cell transplantation to ameliorate graft-versus-host disease in the Bertaina Lab at Stanford University School of Medicine. Ultimately, decreasing barriers to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in order to improve donor availability in Latin America is in alignment with his future career goals.

  • Anupama Narla

    Anupama Narla

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests are to study the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies and to translate these insights into the work-up and management of pediatric bone marrow failure syndromes.

  • Rofida Nofal

    Rofida Nofal

    Clinical Scholar, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine
    Postdoctoral Scholar, Stem Cell Transplantation

    BioDr. Rofida Nofal is a physician scientist with special interest in benign hematology, immune-hematology and stem cell transplant. She is a postdoc scholar at the Czechowicz lab in the Stanford University’s Department of Pediatrics, Hematology, Oncology, Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine Division.
    Dr. Nofal’s primary clinical interests are immune-hematological disorders, primary immune-deficiency/immune dysregulations disorders as well as non-malignant transplant and non-genotoxic conditioning. Her current research interests are in bone marrow failure syndromes focusing on Fanconi Anemia (FA); understanding the disease biology, the immune profile of patients with FA as well as determinants of disease severity, progression, and response to therapy.
    Her current main research project at the Czechowicz lab addresses clonal hematopoiesis in patients with Fanconi Anemia, trying to understand leukemogenesis and identify good biomarkers for early detection of clonal evolution to inform treatment decisions in an effort to improve outcome of stem cell therapy in Fanconi Anemia. Other research projects she is involved in, include gene therapy and alternative donor therapy for Fanconi Anemia; addressing how therapy affects disease phenotype, leukemogenesis and stem cell biology and function.
    Dr. Nofal completed a pediatric residency in the Children’s Hospital Zagazig university in Egypt, after which she worked as an assistant lecturer in the department of Pediatrics. During that time, she pursued specialty training in the Primary Immune Deficiency (PID) in Cairo University Children’s Hospital, where she developed her interests in immune-hematology, immune-deficiency and dysregulations. Dr. Nofal then moved to the US and completed a pediatric residency in St. John Hospital in MI where she continued to pursue her specialty interests during her rotations in the Comprehensive Immune-Hematology program in Mott Children’s Hospital in Ann Arbor, the Diagnostic Immunology Lab in Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, and the BMT center in Children’s Hospital LA. Dr. Nofal then joined the pediatric hematology oncology program at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital with focus on immune-hematology, BMF syndromes, non-malignant and in-utero transplant.

  • Allison Pribnow

    Allison Pribnow

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSolid Tumors, Bone Sarcomas, Global Oncology, Health Disparities

  • Sneha Ramakrishna

    Sneha Ramakrishna

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioSneha Ramakrishna, M.D., is an Instructor of Pediatrics in the Division of Hematology and Oncology, working with Dr Crystal Mackall. Dr. Ramakrishna obtained her B. A. from the University of Chicago and her M.D. from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University. She completed her residency training in Pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and her fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at the Johns Hopkins/National Cancer Institute combined program. Her research focuses on identifying mechanisms of relapse in patients following chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies and optimizing both CAR design and tumor sensitivity to improve long-term success of CAR T cell therapies.

  • Rameshwar (Ram) Rao MD PhD

    Rameshwar (Ram) Rao MD PhD

    Affiliate, Dean's Office Operations - Dean Other
    Fellow in Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioMy scientific training spans over a decade of published research in the fields of vascularized bone tissue engineering, biomineralization, gene therapy, and spectral ultrasound. I earned my BS from UC Davis and MS/PhD in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan. I have aimed to form highly collaborative and multidisciplinary research groups at each level of training. This work has resulted in 21 publications, award-winning manuscripts, and multiple national conference research awards. My successful research career began during my undergraduate studies where my work in Prof. Kent Leach’s lab resulted in 3 publications and the Department of Biomedical Engineering Outstanding Undergraduate Research Award. My graduate thesis under the guidance of Prof. Jan Stegemann resulted in 12 publications (7 as first author) in high quality, peer-reviewed journals in the fields of engineering and biotechnology. My graduate studies were funded by an NIH T32 Training grant and the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship. My graduate work culminated in the 2013 Outstanding PhD Research Award from the Society for Biomaterials (SFB) and the 2013 Outstanding Student Award from the Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Society (TERMIS). Recognizing the gap in translation of bioengineering research into clinical practice, I opted to pursue an MD at the University of Michigan to become the physician-scientist that identifies clinical problems, engineers the solution, and delivers it back to the patient to advance treatments and improve survival outcomes. My success continued through medical school with 4 clinical research manuscripts and Graduation with Distinction in Research, awarded to 10% of the class.

    In the next phase of my training, I will complete my fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at Stanford through the Accelerated Research Pathway by the American Board of Pediatrics. Prof. Sarah Heilshorn, Associate Chair of Materials Science at Stanford, will be my primary research and career development mentor. Together, we have designed an innovative approach targeting the extracellular matrix to improve survival outcomes in pediatric osteosarcoma.

  • Julien Sage

    Julien Sage

    Elaine and John Chambers Professor of Pediatric Cancer and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe investigate the mechanisms by which normal cells become tumor cells, and we combine genetics, genomics, and proteomics approaches to investigate the differences between the proliferative response in response to injury and the hyperproliferative phenotype of cancer cells and to identify novel therapeutic targets in cancer cells.

  • Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the molecular pathways that regulate normal and aberrant blood cell development, including acute leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. We are also studying novel drugs for treatment of cancer.

  • Ece Canan Sayitoglu

    Ece Canan Sayitoglu

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Stem Cell Transplantation

    BioExperienced Postdoctoral Researcher with a demonstrated history of working with genetically modified immune cells. Skilled in Genome Editing/Crispr, Multi-color Flow Cytometry, Molecular Biology, Cell Culture and Immunotherapy.

  • Liora Schultz

    Liora Schultz

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioI am currently postdoctoral research fellow pursuing immunotherapy research in the oncology department at Stanford University. My clinical training as a pediatric hematology oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center highlighted the desperate need for novel therapeutic options for a subtype of aggressive pediatric leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Despite our best standard of care for AML, long term survival rates range from 50-60% with an unacceptably high relapse rate of 40%. The urgent need for novel treatments inspired me to pursue a research project in adoptive immunotherapy, genetically modifying Tcells to express artificial T cell receptors, termed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), that target AML specific antigens. In parallel to my clinical training, I constructed an AML specific CAR and demonstrated its ability to redirect T cell function mediating eradication of AML cells. As the field of CAR therapy rapidly advances, novel methods to optimize this therapeutic modality are imperative. To this end, supported by research demonstrating superior antitumor function of naïve derived effector T cells compared to central memory derived effector T cells, I am investigating whether preferential modification of naïve T cells to express CARs will generate a T cell subpopulation with increased efficacy. Consolidating my clinical and research experiences within highly academic institutes allows me to synthesize my pursuit of scientific rigor and commitment to the field of oncology, with a mission to achieve productive research and translatable results.

  • Mona D. Shah, MD, MBA

    Mona D. Shah, MD, MBA

    Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology

    BioMona is a pediatric hematologist-oncologist, who earned her MD degree at the University of Maryland in 2001. She completed both her categorical pediatric and global health residencies in 2004, followed by a pediatric hematology-oncology fellowship in 2007. She earned her MS in Clinical Investigation as part of the Clinical Scientist Training Program at Baylor College of Medicine in 2011, and more recently, completed an Executive MBA at Rice University’s Jones School of Business in 2018.

    Mona was an Associate Professor at Baylor College of Medicine (2007 - 2020) in both Pediatrics and Medicine, local site PI on a number of pediatric hemostasis/thrombosis clinical trials, and spent 10 years as an Associate Medical Director of clinical operations, quality, and safety at Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX.

    Mona joined Genentech (a member of Roche Group)’s Rare Blood Disorders Franchise (Product Development - Oncology-Hematology) in February 2020, now as Lead Medical Director, and currently serves as Medical Monitor for the COMMUTE-a and COMMUTE-p Phase III clinical trials (crovalimab in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, aHUS). She is also engaged with the Renal Franchise (I2O) in developing crovalimab in Lupus Nephritis (Phase I & II clinical trials in development), and with Human Factors/Pediatric Formulations Working Group on autoinjector devices and oral formulations. Since May 2022, Mona is spending 25% of her time with Early Development Safety (EDS) on a one year rotation. She is based in South San Francisco, CA, and will be working closely with both EDS gRED (Oncology and OMNI) teams.

    Mona has kept a bucket list since she was 7 years old (keeps growing): Running wild bouldering/rock climbing as a child in the Shenandoah/Blue Ridge Mountains, swimming with dolphins/piranhas in the Amazon, climbing inside a volcano caldera in Iceland, snorkeling the Great Barrier Reef ... have passport/will travel!

    Since July 2022, she has joined Stanford University School of Medicine, as an Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology-Oncology. Mona enjoys free time in her new home base near San Francisco, where she hosts her visiting parents, friends, and extended family.