School of Medicine


Showing 21-30 of 57 Results

  • Philip Grant

    Philip Grant

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioMy research focuses on antiretroviral therapy and complications of HIV including immune reconstitution inflammatory disease, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease.

  • Dora Ho

    Dora Ho

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Ho did her PhD work in HSV pathogenesis and postdoctoral research in CNS gene therapy with viral vectors. She is currently the clinical chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine. She specializes in infection complications of immunocompromised patients, such as those with cancers, solid organ transplant or bone marrow transplant.

  • Mark Holodniy

    Mark Holodniy

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research program is currently focused in three areas: 1) Translational research (viral evolution and antiviral resistance prevalence and development), 2) Clinical trials (diagnostic assay/medical device, antimicrobials and immunomodulators), and 3) Health services research focusing on public health, infectious diseases and clinical outcomes.

  • Marisa Holubar

    Marisa Holubar

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Marisa Holubar specializes in the treatment of infectious diseases and works primarily in the inpatient setting. She is particularly interested in antimicrobial stewardship.

  • Prasanna Jagannathan

    Prasanna Jagannathan

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    BioI am an Infectious Diseases physician-scientist with a research program in human immunology of malaria and clinical trials of immune modulatory interventions. Our group has been conducting detailed longitudinal cohort studies in children and pregnant women in order to study how repeated malaria shapes the cellular immune response. We are also studying how malaria control interventions such as antimalarial chemoprevention and vector control shape the acquisition and/or maintenance of protective immunity to malaria. We have expanded this work to not only include studying the mechanisms driving naturally acquired immunity to malaria, but other infectious diseases, including SARS CoV-2. We have also lead and/or participated in studies evaluating therapeutic strategies for patients with mild to moderate COVID-19.

  • Shanthi Kappagoda

    Shanthi Kappagoda

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCompleted a Masters degree in Health Services Research in 2012. Research focused on using network models to develop a clinical research agenda for neglected tropical diseases.

  • Michael Kozal

    Michael Kozal

    Senior Associate Dean for Veterans Affairs and Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    BioDr. Kozal was appointed Senior Associate Dean for Veteran Affairs at Stanford School of Medicine and Chief of Staff at VA Palo Alto Health Care System in 2021. Prior to coming to Stanford, he served as Associate Dean for Veteran Affairs at Yale University School of Medicine and the Chief of Staff at VA Connecticut Healthcare System.

    Dr. Kozal is a translational researcher who has focused his research career on three areas: 1) investigating the genetic determinants of HIV and HCV drug resistance, 2) the development of new molecular methods to detect viral mutations, and 3) HIV and HCV clinical trials involving new drugs and diagnostic technology. Dr. Kozal is an expert in microarray and deep sequencing technology receiving patents for his work in genotyping. Dr. Kozal previously directed the Yale HIV Clinical Trials Group and has more than 20 years of experience in running clinical trials, serving as the principal investigator or site investigator on >40 HIV and Hepatitis C trials. He has served on multiple VA and NIH/NCI review panels and is a current a member of the DHHS/NIH Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents.

  • Nathan Lo

    Nathan Lo

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research laboratory is interested in studying the transmission of infectious diseases and impact of public health interventions with an ultimate goal of informing public health policy. We study a diverse set of pathogens, both domestically and internationally, including vaccine-preventable infections (including COVID-19) and neglected parasitic diseases (such as schistosomiasis). Our group applies diverse computational methodologies, including tools from fields of epidemiology, mathematical and statistical modeling, simulation, and policy analysis.

    A large emphasis of our work is translating scientific evidence into public health policy. Our track record includes multiple studies that have changed policy in the fields of neglected parasitic diseases and COVID-19. We work closely with policy organizations like the World Health Organization and the California Department of Public Health. Nathan served as the lead writer of the World Health Organization guidelines on schistosomiasis (2022) and strongyloidiasis.

    Our current research focuses on the following areas:
    (1) Vaccine-preventable infectious diseases (including COVID-19) in the United States, with a focus on studying vaccines and transmission dynamics
    (2) Public health strategies for control and elimination of globally important neglected infectious diseases, such as helminths infections (schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis) and typhoid fever

    Hiring
    We are seeking to fill multiple research positions at all levels. Candidates interested in working on computational public health research related to infectious diseases with a strong quantitative background are highly encouraged to apply. If you an interested, please submit a cover letter, CV, and names of two references to Nathan.Lo@stanford.edu.