Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


Showing 1-50 of 68 Results

  • Felipe Galvis-Delgado

    Felipe Galvis-Delgado

    Masters Student in Environment and Resources, admitted Spring 2023
    Master of Arts Student in International Policy, admitted Autumn 2022

    BioFelipe is an M.A. student in International Policy and an M.S. student in Environment and Resources. He focuses his studies on renewable energy development, electricity markets, climate finance, and the transition toward a clean energy economy in oil and gas dependent economies, such as his home communities of New Mexico and Colombia.

    Most recently, Felipe worked for Pattern Energy, an international renewable energy developer, during which he worked on utility-scale wind, solar, and storage projects, including SunZia, the largest renewable energy project in U.S. history. Prior to joining Stanford, Felipe spent five years in Washington D.C. working on policy in the U.S. Congress, where he worked on several policy issues including international affairs, homeland security and climate-agriculture. During this time, Felipe managed his boss’ work in several Senate Appropriations Subcommittees and in the House Homeland Security Committee. Felipe also drafted several pieces of legislation that ultimately were enacted into law. Outside of work, Felipe was an active member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute and the Congressional Hispanic Staff Association.

    Felipe holds a B.A. in International Relations and Politics from Pomona College, where he was also a four-year member of the men’s soccer team. During his time at Pomona, Felipe studied European politics and economics for a semester in Florence, Italy, and conducted field work in Budapest, Hungary for his senior thesis on right-wing populists’ exploitation of migration crises.

  • Angela Garcia

    Angela Garcia

    Associate Professor of Anthropology

    BioProfessor Garcia’s work engages historical and institutional processes through which violence and suffering is produced and lived. A central theme is the disproportionate burden of addiction, depression and incarceration among poor families and communities. Her research is oriented toward understanding how attachments, affect, and practices of intimacy are important registers of politics and economy.

    Garcia’s most recent book, The Way That Leads Among the Lost: Life, Death, and Hope in Mexico City's Anexos (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2024) examines how violence precedes and functions in the ways families seek to care for and protect each other. Central to this work are anexos (annexes), informal and coercive rehabilitation clinics for the treatment of drug addiction that are run and utilized by the working poor, and which incorporate violence into their therapeutic practices. Anexos are widespread across Mexico and are widely condemned as abusive, illegal, ineffective, and unethical. By situating anexos within a larger social and historical frame, and closely attending to life within and beyond these spaces, Garcia shows that anexos provide refuge from the catastrophic and everyday violence associated with the drug war. The book also demonstrates that anexos are the leading resource for the treatment of drug addiction among Mexico’s poor, and are an essential space of protection for individuals at risk of the intensifying violence in Mexico.

    Garcia's first book, The Pastoral Clinic: Addiction and Dispossession Along The Rio Grande (University of California Press, 2010) received awards in anthropology and writing. The Pastoral Clinic explores the relationship between intergenerational heroin use, poverty and colonial history in northern New Mexico. It argues that heroin addiction among Hispanos is a contemporary expression of an enduring history of dispossession, social and intimate fragmentation, and the existential desire for a release from these. Ongoing work in the U.S. explores processes of legal “re-entry” and intimate repair that incarcerated and paroled drug users undertake, particularly within kin networks.

    Currently, Garcia is studying the environmental, social, and bodily effects resulting from Mexico City’s ongoing desagüe, the massive drainage project initiated by Spanish colonists in the seventeenth century in the Valley of Mexico. Mexico City’s desagüe speaks to some of the most pressing concerns of our time: water scarcity, humans’ relationship to changing ecologies, and chronic disease. This project examines how the desagüe remakes bodies, neighborhoods, and social worlds.

  • Christopher Gardner

    Christopher Gardner

    Rehnborg Farquhar Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe role of nutrition in individual and societal health, with particular interests in: plant-based diets, differential response to low-carb vs. low-fat weight loss diets by insulin resistance status, chronic disease prevention, randomized controlled trials, human nutrition, community based studies, Community Based Participatory Research, sustainable food movement (animal rights and welfare, global warming, human labor practices), stealth health, nutrition policy, nutrition guidelines

  • Anchal Garg

    Anchal Garg

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioShe is an environmental researcher working on the negative implications of air pollution on human health and climate change. She has worked on monitoring, mapping, emission inventory, and identifying health hazards of Volatile Organic Compounds, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, and Particulate Matter present in the air. Anchal conducted extensive fieldwork, surveys, and cross-sectional studies to identify air quality and health-related data. Her current project is modeling and measuring the health consequences of indoor air pollutants formed during the combustion of stove gas in California.

  • Margot Gerritsen

    Margot Gerritsen

    Professor of Energy Resources Engineering, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My work is about understanding and simulating complicated fluid flow problems. My research focuses on the design of highly accurate and efficient parallel computational methods to predict the performance of enhanced oil recovery methods. I'm particularly interested in gas injection and in-situ combustion processes. These recovery methods are extremely challenging to simulate because of the very strong nonlinearities in the governing equations. Outside petroleum engineering, I'm active in coastal ocean simulation with colleagues from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, yacht research and pterosaur flight mechanics with colleagues from the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, and the design of search algorithms in collaboration with the Library of Congress and colleagues from the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering.

    Teaching
    I teach courses in both energy related topics (reservoir simulation, energy, and the environment) in my department, and mathematics for engineers through the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering (ICME). I also initiated two courses in professional development in our department (presentation skills and teaching assistant training), and a consulting course for graduate students in ICME, which offers expertise in computational methods to the Stanford community and selected industries.

    Professional Activities
    Senior Associate Dean, School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences, Stanford (from 2015); Director, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Stanford (from 2010); Stanford Fellow (2010-2012); Magne Espedal Professor II, Bergen University (2011-2014); Aldo Leopold Fellow (2009); Chair, SIAM Activity group in Geosciences (2007, present, reelected in 2009); Faculty Research Fellow, Clayman Institute (2008); Elected to Council of Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) (2007); organizing committee, 2008 Gordon Conference on Flow in Porous Media; producer, Smart Energy podcast channel; Director, Stanford Yacht Research; Co-director and founder, Stanford Center of Excellence for Computational Algorithms in Digital Stewardship; Editor, Journal of Small Craft Technology; Associate editor, Transport in Porous Media; Reviewer for various journals and organizations including SPE, DoE, NSF, Journal of Computational Physics, Journal of Scientific Computing, Transport in Porous Media, Computational Geosciences; member, SIAM, SPE, KIVI, AGU, and APS

  • Rwaida Gharib

    Rwaida Gharib

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources, admitted Autumn 2023

    BioRwaida “Rudy” Gharib is pursuing her PhD in environment and resources at the Stanford School of Sustainability. Her research focuses on environmental justice and the policy changes/financing needed to support the climate adaptation and resilience of vulnerable populations—specifically, those living in rural poverty, women and girls, and im/migrants/refugees.

  • William Gilly

    William Gilly

    Professor of Oceans

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy work has contributed to understanding electrical excitability in nerve & muscle in organisms ranging from brittle-stars to mammals. Current research addresses behavior, physiology and ecology of squid through field and lab approaches. Electronic tagging plus in situ video, acoustic and oceanographic methods are used to study behaviors and life history in the field. Lab work focuses on control of chromogenic behavior by the chromatophore network and of locomotion by the giant axon system.

  • Meredith Goebel

    Meredith Goebel

    Physical Sci Res Scientist

    BioMeredith Goebel primary interests center on the application of geophysical methods for addressing problems surrounding the evaluation and management of groundwater resources. She currently serves as a Research Scientist at Stanford University, developing methods for integrating new datasets into groundwater models to improve their accuracy and utility, specifically in California’s Central Valley. In addition to this work, she is also involved in number of projects investigating new tools for groundwater recharge site assessment in the Central Valley.

    Meredith completed her PhD in Geophysics at Stanford University, working with electrical and electromagnetic geophysical methods to map and monitor saltwater intrusion at both the lab and field scale. The field scale research for her PhD was conducted along the coast of the Monterey Bay, mapping the distribution of fresh and salt water in the subsurface both onshore and offshore along the bay. Prior to starting at Stanford she got her BA in Geophysics from UC Berkeley, and interned in the seismology group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  • Mark Golden

    Mark Golden

    Director of Communications, Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioWorking with the Precourt Institute's small communications team, my principal responsibility is to inform the public about energy research and education at Stanford through articles, press releases, social media, Stanford Energy newsletter, printed materials and presentations. I also aid reporters writing about energy. I began work at Stanford in 2011, when I joined the Precourt Institute's communications team as a writer.

    Before coming to Stanford, I taught in the San Francisco public schools for several years. Previously, I was a reporter for Dow Jones & Co. for 10 years, primarily covering the U.S. natural gas and power industries. I also worked in Kiev, Ukraine in 1996-97, editing a weekly news magazine on that country's economic and political development. I also worked for Columbia University, writing on public health research.

  • Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Professor of Health Policy

    BioJeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, PhD, is a Professor of Health Policy and a Core Faculty Member in the Centers for Health Policy and Primary Care and Outcomes Research. His research focuses on complex policy decisions surrounding the prevention and management of increasingly common, chronic diseases and the life course impact of exposure to their risk factors. In the context of both developing and developed countries including the US, India, China, and South Africa, he has examined chronic conditions including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer, tuberculosis, and hepatitis C and on risk factors including smoking, physical activity, obesity, malnutrition, and other diseases themselves. He combines simulation modeling methods and cost-effectiveness analyses with econometric approaches and behavioral economic studies to address these issues. Dr. Goldhaber-Fiebert graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1997, with an A.B. in the History and Literature of America. After working as a software engineer and consultant, he conducted a year-long public health research program in Costa Rica with his wife in 2001. Winner of the Lee B. Lusted Prize for Outstanding Student Research from the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2006 and in 2008, he completed his PhD in Health Policy concentrating in Decision Science at Harvard University in 2008. He was elected as a Trustee of the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2011 and Secretary/Treasurer in 2021.

    Past and current research topics:

    - Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors: Randomized and observational studies in Costa Rica examining the impact of community-based lifestyle interventions and the relationship of gender, risk factors, and care utilization.

    -Cervical cancer: Model-based cost-effectiveness analyses and costing methods studies that examine policy issues relating to cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus vaccination in countries including the United States, Brazil, India, Kenya, Peru, South Africa, Tanzania, and Thailand.

    - Measles, haemophilus influenzae type b, and other childhood infectious diseases: Longitudinal regression analyses of country-level data from middle and upper income countries that examine the link between vaccination, sustained reductions in mortality, and evidence of herd immunity.

    - Patient adherence: Studies in both developing and developed countries of the costs and effectiveness of measures to increase successful adherence. Adherence to cervical cancer screening as well as to disease management programs targeting depression and obesity is examined from both a decision-analytic and a behavioral economics perspective.

    - Simulation modeling methods: Research examining model calibration and validation, the appropriate representation of uncertainty in projected outcomes, the use of models to examine plausible counterfactuals at the biological and epidemiological level, and the reflection of population and spatial heterogeneity.

  • Andrea Goldsmith

    Andrea Goldsmith

    Stephen Harris Professor in the School of Engineering, Emerita

    BioAndrea Goldsmith is the Dean of Engineering and Applied Science and the Arthur LeGrand Doty Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Princeton University. She was previously the Stephen Harris Professor of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, where she is now Harris Professor Emerita. Her research interests are in information theory, communication theory, and signal processing, and their application to wireless communications, interconnected systems, and biomedical devices. She founded and served as Chief Technical Officer of Plume WiFi (formerly Accelera, Inc.) and of Quantenna (QTNA), Inc, and she serves on the Board of Directors for Intel (INTC), Medtronic (MDT), Crown Castle Inc (CCI), and the Marconi Society. She also serves on the Presidential Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST). Dr. Goldsmith is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Royal Academy of Engineering, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is a Fellow of the IEEE and has received several awards for her work, including the Marconi Prize, the ACM Sigmobile Outstanding Contribution Award, the IEEE Sumner Technical Field Award, the ACM Athena Lecturer Award, the ComSoc Armstrong Technical Achievement Award, the Kirchmayer Graduate Teaching Award, the WICE Mentoring Award, and the Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal’s Women of Influence Award. She is author of the book ``Wireless Communications'' and co-author of the books ``MIMO Wireless Communications,” “Principles of Cognitive Radio,” and “Machine Learning and Wireless Communications,” all published by Cambridge University Press, as well as an inventor on 29 patents. She received the B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from U.C. Berkeley.

    Dr. Goldsmith is the founding Chair of the IEEE Board of Directors Committee on Diversity and Inclusion. She served as President of the IEEE Information Theory Society in 2009, as founding Chair of its Student Committee, and as founding Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Information Theory. She has also served on the Board of Governors for both the IEEE Information Theory and Communications Societies. At Stanford she served as Chair of Stanford’s Faculty Senate and for multiple terms as a Senator, and on its Academic Council Advisory Board, Budget Group, Committee on Research, Planning and Policy Board, Commissions on Graduate and on Undergraduate Education, Faculty Women’s Forum Steering Committee, and Task Force on Women and Leadership.

  • Anna Gomes

    Anna Gomes

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science, admitted Autumn 2020

    BioMy main interests lie within anthropogenic climate change, environmental science, and agriculture. The complex system dynamics and interconnections between agriculture and the environment including nutrient cycling, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions are a few of the most critical challenges for today's soil scientists. After completing a master’s degree in Sustainability Science and Environmental Studies at Lund University in Sweden, researching farmer adoption of practices which mitigate GHGs from arable soils in the Netherlands at Wageningen University, I started a PhD in Earth System Science at Stanford University, aiming to focus on soil and environmental biogeochemistry. In parallel to my work in academia, I have been working on a start-up to address food waste and food insecurity in CA (Ugly Food Market), in addition to being a team member on several projects including a sharing library (Circle Centre), a soil science educational platform (Soil Life), and other sustainability related initiatives.

  • Kenneth Goodson

    Kenneth Goodson

    Senior Associate Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs, Davies Family Provostial Professor, and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Goodson’s Nanoheat Lab studies heat transfer in electronic nanostructures, microfluidic heat sinks, and packaging, focussing on basic transport physics and practical impact for industry. We work closely with companies on novel cooling and packaging strategies for power devices, portables, ASICs, & data centers. At present, sponsors and collaborators include ARPA-E, the NSF POETS Center, SRC ASCENT, Google, Intel, Toyota, Ford, among others.

  • Deborah M Gordon

    Deborah M Gordon

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Deborah M Gordon studies the evolutionary ecology of collective behavior. Ant colonies operate without central control, using local interactions to regulate colony behavior.

  • Emily Gordon

    Emily Gordon

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioPhD, Colorado State University, 2023
    MSc, University of Otago, 2020
    BSc, University of Otago, 2018

  • Steven Gorelick

    Steven Gorelick

    Cyrus Fisher Tolman Professor and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests. Research : .

    As a hydrogeologist and hydrologist, my research involves the study of water resources and water security with emphasis on freshwater. Using lab and field data, our aim is to develop an understanding of fundamental aspects of the transport of water and contaminants, and to investigate regional water resources systems. We have developed simulation-based planning tools to aid in sustainable agricultural and urban water management in the US, Mexico, India, and Jordan. With my colleagues, we have initiated the Global Freshwater Initiative, which studies water resources vulnerability problems throughout the world. During the past 15 years, our field investigations have focused on the interactions between groundwater and patterns of vegetation in studies of both meadow and salt-marsh ecohydrology. Scales of physical processes of interest extend from the domain of small pores to vast regional subsurface flow environments. Although driven by observations and data, we develop conceptual and quantitative models to rigorously understand physical processes, make predictions, and explore the impacts of new water management policies, such as taxes, quota, and markets. Such models enhance our understanding of groundwater flow behavior and provide the means to better manage water resources. .




    . - Teaching :

    . I teach courses for graduate and undergraduate students involving principles and methods used in physical and contaminant hydrogeology. In addition, I run a seminar series that exposes students to a variety of multidisciplinary topics involving hydrology. .





    : - Professional Activities :


    . 2021-2022 von Humboldt Fellow-Germany, 2022-23 Fulbright Fellow - Distinguished Chair in Science, Technology and Innovation, Australian-American Program, 2016 Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 2014 Best Paper in Environmental Research Letters in 2014 (Padowski and Gorelick, (2014), 2013 Editor's Choice Award, Water Resources Research for paper Srinivasan et al., (2012), Member, US National Academy of Engineering (2012), International Fellow, Institute for Environmental Science and Research (ESR) (2011), New Zealand, Fulbright Senior Scholar (2008-09); Chester C. Keisel Memorial Lecturer, University of Arizona (2008); Best Paper Award in Computers and Geosciences, International Association for Mathematical Geology (2006); fellow, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (2005); Stanford representative to the Consortium of Universities for Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences (2005-2008); M. King Hubbert Science Award, NGWA (2004); Ineson Distinguished Lecturer (1998); Fulbright Senior Scholar (1997); O.E. Meinzer Award, GSA (1994) James B. Macelwane medal, AGU (1990); Fellow, GSA (1988) and AGU (1990); Editorial Board, Optimization and Engineering Journal (1990-present); visiting professor, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Ecological Engineering Laboratory (2006); visiting professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, jointly at the Swiss Federal Institute for Environmental Science and Technology (2005); visiting scholar, University of Cambridge, Zoology (2007); visiting scientist, CSIRO, Perth, Australia (2009); Member AGU Water and Society Technical Committee (2011-present) visiting professor, University of Western Australia Centre for Ecohydrology (2012); visiting professor, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH Zurich (2013, 2019)

  • Diana Gragg

    Diana Gragg

    Managing Director Explore Energy, Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Role at StanfordManaging Director, Explore Energy, Precourt Institute for Energy
    Core Lecturer, Civil and Environmental Engineering

  • Mark Granovetter

    Mark Granovetter

    Joan B. Ford Professor

    BioMark Granovetter's main interest is in the way people, social networks and social institutions interact and shape one another. He has written extensively on this subject, including his two most widely cited articles "The Strength of Weak Ties" (1973) and "Economic Action and Social Structure: The Problem of Embeddedness" (1985). In recent years, his focus has been on the social foundations of the economy, and he is working on a book entitled Society and Economy, to be published by Harvard University Press in two volumes. The first volume, Society and Economy: Framework and Principles,appeared in 2017. It is broadly theoretical, treating the role in the economy of social networks, norms, culture, trust, power, and social institutions. The second volume will use this framework to illuminate the study of such important topics as corruption, corporate governance, organizational form and the emergence of new industries such as the American electricity industry and the high-tech industry of Silicon Valley.

  • Andrea Gray

    Andrea Gray

    Director of Finance and Operations, Sustainability Accelerator

    BioAndrea joined the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability in 2023 from Stanford's Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC), where she had been the Associate Director for Administration and Finance since 2017. Andrea started her career at Stanford in 2012 as a director at the Graduate School of Business, responsible for delivering innovation and entrepreneurship programs internationally. In 2015, she moved to the School of Medicine as an internal consultant, supporting leadership at the School and two hospitals across a portfolio of initiatives in the areas of international strategy, graduate medical education, clinical expansion, and faculty affairs. Prior to Stanford, Andrea managed a product line at a Fortune 500 company, helped lead a technology startup from conception to acquisition, worked as a strategy consultant, played a leadership role at a grassroots environmental non-profit, and directed an educational foundation. Andrea holds a bachelor's degree from Queen's University in Canada.