Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


Showing 1-20 of 33 Results

  • Greg Beroza

    Greg Beroza

    Wayne Loel Professor of Earth Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEarthquake seismology

  • Biondo Biondi

    Biondo Biondi

    Barney and Estelle Morris Professor
    On Leave from 09/01/2023 To 08/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My students and I devise new algorithms to improve the imaging of reflection seismic data. Images obtained from seismic data are the main source of information on the structural and stratigraphic complexities in Earth's subsurface. These images are constructed by processing seismic wavefields recorded at the surface of Earth and generated by either active-source experiments (reflection data), or by far-away earthquakes (teleseismic data). The high-resolution and fidelity of 3-D reflection-seismic images enables oil companies to drill with high accuracy for hydrocarbon reservoirs that are buried under two kilometers of water and up to 15 kilometers of sediments and hard rock. To achieve this technological feat, the recorded data must be processed employing advanced mathematical algorithms that harness the power of huge computational resources. To demonstrate the advantages of our new methods, we process 3D field data on our parallel cluster running several hundreds of processors.

    Teaching
    I teach a course on seismic imaging for graduate students in geophysics and in the other departments of the School of Earth Sciences. I run a research graduate seminar every quarter of the year. This year I will be teaching a one-day short course in 30 cities around the world as the SEG/EAGE Distinguished Instructor Short Course, the most important educational outreach program of these two societies.

    Professional Activities
    2007 SEG/EAGE Distinguished Instructor Short Course (2007); co-director, Stanford Exploration Project (1998-present); founding member, Editorial Board of SIAM Journal on Imaging Sciences (2007-present); member, SEG Research Committee (1996-present); chairman, SEG/EAGE Summer Research Workshop (2006)

  • Jef Caers

    Jef Caers

    Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences and, by courtesy, of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on assuring 100% renewable energy through development of geothermal energy and critical mineral supply, developing approaches from data acquisition to decision making under uncertainty and risk assessment.

  • Jon Claerbout

    Jon Claerbout

    Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Professor of Geophysics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsReflection Seismology

  • Simone D'Amico

    Simone D'Amico

    Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and, by courtesy, of Geophysics

    BioSimone D’Amico is Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AA), W.M. Keck Faculty Scholar in the School of Engineering, and Professor of Geophysics (by Courtesy). He is the Founding Director of the Space Rendezvous Laboratory and Director of the AA Undergraduate Program. He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Politecnico di Milano (2003) and the Ph.D. degree from Delft University of Technology (2010). Before Stanford, Dr. D’Amico was research scientist and team leader at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) for 11 years. There he gave key contributions to formation-flying and proximity operations missions such as GRACE (NASA/DLR), PRISMA (OHB/DLR/CNES/DTU), TanDEM-X (DLR), BIROS (DLR) and PROBA-3 (ESA). His research aims at enabling future miniature distributed space systems for unprecedented remote sensing, space and planetary science, exploration and spaceflight sustainability. To this end he performs fundamental and applied research at the intersection of advanced astrodynamics, spacecraft Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC), autonomy, decision making and space system engineering. Dr. D’Amico is institutional PI of three upcoming autonomous satellite swarm missions funded by NASA and NSF, namely STARLING, VISORS, and SWARM-EX. He is Fellow of AAS, Associate Fellow of AIAA, Associate Editor of AIAA JGCD, Advisor of NASA and several space startups. He was the recipient of several awards, including Best Paper Awards at IAF (2022), IEEE (2021), AIAA (2021), AAS (2019) conferences, the Leonardo 500 Award by the Leonardo da Vinci Society/ISSNAF (2019), FAI/NAA’s Group Diploma of Honor (2018), DLR’s Sabbatical/Forschungssemester (2012) and Wissenschaft Preis (2006), and NASA’s Group Achievement Award for the GRACE mission (2004).

  • Eric Dunham

    Eric Dunham

    Professor of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPhysics of natural hazards, specifically earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanoes. Computational geophysics.

  • William Ellsworth

    William Ellsworth

    Professor (Research) of Geophysics, Emeritus

    BioMy research interests can be broadly defined as the study of active faults, the earthquakes they generate and the physics of the earthquake source. A major objective of my work is to improve our knowledge of earthquake hazards through the application of physics-based understanding of the underlying processes. As Co-Director of the Stanford Center for Induced and Triggered Seismicity, my students, postdocs and I conduct multi-disciplinary studies into the causes and consequences of anthropogenic earthquakes in a wide variety of settings. I have also long been committed to earthquake risk reduction, specifically through the transfer of scientific understanding of the hazard to people, businesses, policymakers and government agencies. Before coming to Stanford in 2015, I was a research geophysicist at the U. S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, California for more than 40 years where I focused on problems of seismicity, seismotectonics, probabilistic earthquake forecasting, and earthquake source processes

  • Meredith Goebel

    Meredith Goebel

    Physical Sci Res Scientist

    BioMeredith Goebel primary interests center on the application of geophysical methods for addressing problems surrounding the evaluation and management of groundwater resources. She currently serves as a Research Scientist at Stanford University, developing methods for integrating new datasets into groundwater models to improve their accuracy and utility, specifically in California’s Central Valley. In addition to this work, she is also involved in number of projects investigating new tools for groundwater recharge site assessment in the Central Valley.

    Meredith completed her PhD in Geophysics at Stanford University, working with electrical and electromagnetic geophysical methods to map and monitor saltwater intrusion at both the lab and field scale. The field scale research for her PhD was conducted along the coast of the Monterey Bay, mapping the distribution of fresh and salt water in the subsurface both onshore and offshore along the bay. Prior to starting at Stanford she got her BA in Geophysics from UC Berkeley, and interned in the seismology group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  • Jerry Harris

    Jerry Harris

    The Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Professor in Geophysics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiographical Information
    Jerry M. Harris is the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Geophysics and Associate Dean for the Office of Multicultural Affairs. He joined Stanford in 1988 following 11 years in private industry. He served five years as Geophysics department chair, was the Founding Director of the Stanford Center for Computational Earth and Environmental Science (CEES), and co-launched Stanford's Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP). Graduates from Jerry's research group, the Stanford Wave Physics Lab, work in private industry, government labs, and universities.

    Research
    My research interests address the physics and dynamics of seismic and electromagnetic waves in complex media. My approach to these problems includes theory, numerical simulation, laboratory methods, and the analysis of field data. My group, collectively known as the Stanford Wave Physics Laboratory, specializes on high frequency borehole methods and low frequency labratory methods. We apply this research to the characterization and monitoring of petroleum and CO2 storage reservoirs.

    Teaching
    I teach courses on waves phenomena for borehole geophysics and tomography. I recently introduced and co-taught a new course on computational geosciences.

    Professional Activities
    I was the First Vice President of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in 2003-04, and have served as the Distinguished Lecturer for the SPE, SEG, and AAPG.

  • Leo Hollberg

    Leo Hollberg

    Professor (Research) of Physics and of Geophysics

    BioHow can we make optimal use of quantum systems (atoms, lasers, and electronics) to test fundamental physics principles, enable precision measurements of space-time and when feasible, develop useful devices, sensors, and instruments?

    Professor Hollberg’s research objectives include high precision tests of fundamental physics as well as applications of laser physics and technology. This experimental program in laser/atomic physics focuses on high-resolution spectroscopy of laser-cooled and -trapped atoms, non-linear optical coherence effects in atoms, optical frequency combs, optical/microwave atomic clocks, and high sensitivity trace gas detection. Frequently this involves the study of laser noise and methods to circumvent measurement limitations, up to, and beyond, quantum limited optical detection. Technologies and tools utilized include frequency-stabilized lasers and chip-scale atomic devices. Based in the Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory (HEPL), this research program has strong, synergistic, collaborative connections to the Stanford Center on Position Navigation and Time (SCPNT). Research directions are inspired by experience that deeper understanding of fundamental science is critical and vital in addressing real-world problems, for example in the environment, energy, and navigation. Amazing new technologies and devices enable experiments that test fundamental principles with high precision and sometimes lead to the development of better instruments and sensors. Ultrasensitive optical detection of atoms, monitoring of trace gases, isotopes, and chemicals can impact many fields. Results from well-designed experiments teach us about the “realities” of nature, guide and inform, occasionally produce new discoveries, frequently surprise, and almost always generate new questions and perspectives.

  • Seogi Kang

    Seogi Kang

    Physical Sci Res Scientist

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTo construct basis of groundwater sustainability plan in California, we develop an effective workflow that can map 3D hydrogeology of the subsurface by using airborne electromagnetic data that can cover large area fast.

  • Zerina Kapetanovic

    Zerina Kapetanovic

    Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Geophysics

    BioZerina Kapetanovic is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University working in the area of low-power wireless communication, sensing, and Internet of Things (IoT) systems. Prior to starting at Stanford, Kapetanovic was a postdoctoral researcher at Microsoft Research in the Networking Research Group and Research for Industry Group.

    Kapetanovic's research has been recognized by the Yang Research Award, the Distinguished Dissertation Award from the University of Washington, and is a Terman Faculty Fellow. She also received the Microsoft Research Distinguished Dissertation Grant and was selected to attend the 2020 UC Berkeley Rising Stars in EECS Workshop. Kapetanovic completed her PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Washington in 2022.

  • Simon Klemperer

    Simon Klemperer

    Professor of Geophysics and, by courtesy, of Earth and Planetary Sciences
    On Leave from 04/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI study the growth, tectonic evolution, and deformation of the continents. My research group undertakes field experiments in exemplary areas such as, currently, the Tibet plateau (formed by collision between Indian and Asia); the actively extending Basin-&-Range province of western North America (the Ruby Range Metamorphic Core Complex, NV, and the leaky transform beneath the Salton Trough, CA). We use active and passive seismic methods, electromagnetic recording, and all other available data!

  • Alexandra Konings

    Alexandra Konings

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and, by courtesy, of Geophysics

    BioAlexandra Konings leads the Remote Sensing Ecohydrology group, which studies interactions between the global carbon and water cycles. That is, her research studies how changes in hydrological conditions change ecosystems, and how this in turn feeds back to weather and climate. These interactions include studies of transpiration and root water uptake, photosynthesis, mortality, and fire processes, among others. To address these topics, the groups primarily uses the tools of model development and remote sensing (satellite) data, especially microwave remote sensing data of vegetation water content. Alex believes that a deep understanding of remote sensing techniques and how they can be used to create environmental datasets enables new opportunities for scientific insight and vice versa.

  • Robert Kovach

    Robert Kovach

    Professor of Geophysics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEarthquake seismology, natural hazards, and ancient earthquakes and archaeology