Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education


Showing 81-90 of 93 Results

  • Kathleen Tarr

    Kathleen Tarr

    PWR Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Jurisprudence; Rhetoric and Climate Catastrophe; Strategic Planning in International Relations and Governments; Rhetoric and Global Economy; and Equal Employment Opportunity in the Entertainment Industry

  • John Turman

    John Turman

    Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education

    BioJohn Turman is a lecturer for the Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE) program. He earned his bachelor's degree in philosophy at U.C. Berkeley and completed his PhD in philosophy at Stanford University. John's current research is focused on foundational questions about the concept of knowledge, concepts of action, concepts of the mind, and how facts about a person's mind explain facts about their behavior.

    As a lecturer and teaching fellow John has taught (or helped to teach) Why College; Health Care Ethics and Justice; and Emotion. John Looks forward to teaching Citizenship in the 21st Century this Winter!

  • Cynthia Laura Vialle-Giancotti

    Cynthia Laura Vialle-Giancotti

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioCynthia is a Lecturer for the Civic, Liberal, and Global Education Program in Undergraduate Education.

    Her research encompasses 17th and 18th century French literary forms, with a focus on novels, literary portraits, gendered and ageist representations.

    Her dissertation titled: "Framing Portraits in 18th-Century French Novels" focuses on the portrayal of the body in French fiction of the 17th and 18th centuries. Its principal aim is to show the import of 17th century female authors in shaping 18th century descriptive practices. It also reveals the functions that descriptions of the body serve in the 18th century: instructing and guiding the reader, as well as entertaining her. Lastly, it underlines how descriptive practices offered a medium for female authors to assert their cultural primacy, against male narrative traditions.

    Teaching is my greatest passion. At Stanford I have taught and TA'd classes on various subjects (French language, European History, Italian literature, German Culture, English Gothic Novels, Autobiographies and History of Revolutions) using innovative methods and assignments. My whole teaching approach is oriented toward one goal: to make students perceive the real-life impact of literary studies in particular and the humanities more in general. I am committed to rendering the study of the humanities and the apprenticeship of languages accessible to our diverse community. Having been a FLI (First Generation College) student I understand the difficulties that students from this community encounter and I am happy to support them in their learning needs.

    Research Interests: the novel and novel theory, gender studies, life-writing genres, the body and issues of corporality (death, sickness, aging), supernatural genres, violence against women, history and art history.

  • Gregory Watkins

    Gregory Watkins

    Lecturer

    BioGreg has taught in Structured Liberal Education (SLE) since 2002. He has a BA in Social Theory (a self-designed major) from Stanford, with Honors in Humanities, an MFA in Film Production from UCLA, and a dual PhD in Religious Studies and Humanities from Stanford, also from Stanford. Greg's research interests hover around the intersection of film and religion, and he continues to work on a variety of film projects.

  • Daniela R. P. Weiner

    Daniela R. P. Weiner

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioDaniela R. P. Weiner is a COLLEGE Lecturer in the Civic, Liberal, and Global Education program.

    Previously, she was a Jim Joseph Postdoctoral Fellow in the Concentration in Education & Jewish Studies in the Stanford Graduate School of Education (2020-2022). She is a historian of modern European history (with a focus on Germany and Italy), modern Jewish history, and the Holocaust. Her current book project, "Teaching a Dark Chapter," explores how the post-fascist countries of East Germany, West Germany, and Italy taught the Second World War and the Holocaust in their educational systems. It specifically explores the representations of these events in textbooks. A new project focuses on the history of baptism and conversion during the Holocaust.

    Her research has been published in Journal of Modern Jewish Studies, Journal of Educational Media, Memory, and Society, and Journal of Contemporary History. She has received fellowships/grants from: the Fulbright U.S. Student Program (Germany, AY 2018- 2019); the Leibniz Institute for Educational Media | Georg Eckert Institute; the German Historical Institute, Washington, D.C.; the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies; and the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies.

  • Roberta Wolfson

    Roberta Wolfson

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests20th and 21st Century Multiethnic U.S. Literatures, Comparative Ethnic Studies, Critical Mixed Race Studies, Racial and Social Justice, Ethnofuturist Speculative Fiction, Popular U.S. Culture, Risk and Security Studies

  • Cassie Wright

    Cassie Wright

    PWR Advanced Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Writing Program Administration; Rhetorical Theory, Writing Studies and Assessment, Critical Discourse Analysis , Sports Rhetorics