Bio-X


Showing 21-30 of 39 Results

  • Daniel Fisher

    Daniel Fisher

    David Starr Jordan Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEvolutionary & ecological dynamics & diversity, microbial, expt'l, & cancer

  • Dominik Fleischmann

    Dominik Fleischmann

    Professor of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNon-invasive Cardiovascular Imaging
    Image Post-processing
    Contrast Medium Dynamics

  • Sean Follmer

    Sean Follmer

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHuman Computer Interaction, Haptics, Robotics, Human Centered Design

  • James Ford

    James Ford

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMammalian DNA repair and DNA damage inducible responses; p53 tumor suppressor gene; transcription in nucleotide excision repair and mutagenesis; genetic determinants of cancer cell sensitivity to DNA damage; genetics of inherited cancer susceptibility syndromes and human GI malignancies; clinical cancer genetics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer and mismatch repair deficient colon cancer.

  • Polly Fordyce

    Polly Fordyce

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Fordyce Lab is focused on developing new instrumentation and assays for making quantitative, systems-scale biophysical measurements of molecular interactions. Current research in the lab is focused on three main platforms: (1) arrays of valved reaction chambers for high-throughput protein expression and characterization, (2) spectrally encoded beads for multiplexed bioassays, and (3) sortable droplets and microwells for single-cell assays.

  • Michael B. Fowler, MBBS, FRCP

    Michael B. Fowler, MBBS, FRCP

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAdrenergic nervous system; beta-adrenergic function in, heart failure; drugs in heart failure.

  • Paige Fox, MD, PhD, FACS

    Paige Fox, MD, PhD, FACS

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery)

    BioDr. Paige Fox is Board Certified Plastic Surgeon who specialized in hand surgery, reconstructive microsurgery, as well as peripheral nerve and brachial plexus surgery. She is an Associate Professor in the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive surgery in the Department of Surgery. She works with adult and pediatric patients. Her research focuses on wound healing, disorders of the upper extremity, and surgical biosensors. Dr. Fox has a passion for sustainability and health care's effect on the environment. She is involved in efforts to green the OR and the clinics at Stanford.

  • Christopher Francis

    Christopher Francis

    Professor of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMicrobial cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and metals in the environment; molecular geomicrobiology; marine microbiology; microbial diversity; meta-omics

  • Curtis Frank

    Curtis Frank

    W. M. Keck, Sr. Professor in Engineering, Emeritus

    BioThe properties of ultrathin polymer films are often different from their bulk counterparts. We use spin casting, Langmuir-Blodgett deposition, and surface grafting to fabricate ultrathin films in the range of 100 to 1000 Angstroms thick. Macromolecular amphiphiles are examined at the air-water interface by surface pressure, Brewster angle microscopy, and interfacial shear measurements and on solid substrates by atomic force microscopy, FTIR, and ellipsometry. A vapor-deposition-polymerization process has been developed for covalent grafting of poly(amino acids) from solid substrates. FTIR measurements permit study of secondary structures (right and left-handed alpha helices, parallel and anti-parallel beta sheets) as a function of temperature and environment.

    A broadly interdisciplinary collaboration has been established with the Department of Ophthalmology in the Stanford School of Medicine. We have designed and synthesized a fully interpenetrating network of two different hydrogel materials that have properties consistent with application as a substitute for the human cornea: high water swellability up to 85%,tensile strength comparable to the cornea, high glucose permeability comparable to the cornea, and sufficient tear strength to permit suturing. We have developed a technique for surface modification with adhesion peptides that allows binding of collagen and subsequent growth of epithelial cells. Broad questions on the relationships among molecular structure, processing protocol, and biomedical device application are being pursued.

  • Michael Frank

    Michael Frank

    David and Lucile Packard Foundation Professor of Human Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow do we learn to communicate using language? I study children's language learning and how it interacts with their developing understanding of the social world. I use behavioral experiments, computational tools, and novel measurement methods like large-scale web-based studies, eye-tracking, and head-mounted cameras.