Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute


Showing 1-32 of 32 Results

  • Aida Habtezion MD MSc.

    Aida Habtezion MD MSc.

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLeukocyte recruitment & immune responses in diseases affecting digestive organs

  • Scott S. Hall, Ph.D

    Scott S. Hall, Ph.D

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary area of scholarly and clinical interest is the pathogenesis of problem behaviors shown by individuals diagnosed with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), particularly those with neurogenetic forms of IDD, such as fragile X syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome. My work aims to both advance understanding of these disorders and to identify effective new treatment approaches for pediatric and adult patient populations by state-of-the-art methodologies, such as brain imaging, eye tracking and functional analysis to determine how environmental and biological factors affect the development of aberrant behaviors in these syndromes. The end goal of my research is to create patient-specific methods for treating the symptoms of these disorders.

  • Joachim Hallmayer

    Joachim Hallmayer

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrincipal Investigator
    Infrastructure to facilitate discovery of autism genes
    The purpose of this project is to facilitate the discovery of the genes that contribute autism by maintaining an infrastructure which research groups studying the genetics of autism can work collaboratively. This will be
    accomplished through workshops, a Virtual Private Network, and access to a database that includes phenotype and genotype data from all participating groups.

    Principal Investigator
    A California Population-Based Twin Study of Autism
    This will address several fundamental questions: (1) What is the heritability of autism (2) What is the contribution of genetic factors to variation in symptom dimensions? (3) Is there a continuum between the quantitative neurocognitive traits and clinical disorder? (4) What proportion of the variance in the neurocognitive traits is accounted for by genetic and non-genetic factors?

    Co-Investigator
    Center for Integrating Ethics in Genetics Research(Cho)
    The goal of this project is to serve as a center of excellence in neurogenetics research, to develop a national model for bench, to bedside research ethics consultation, and to provide training opportunity in biomedical ethics.

    Co-Investigator
    Gene, Brain and Behavior in Turner Syndrome(Reiss)
    The primary objective of this project is to use advanced, multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, analyses of X chromosome parent-of-origin and cognitive-behavioral assessment to elucidate the effects of monosomy and X-linked imprinting on neurodevelopment and neural function in a large cohort of young girls with Turner syndrome, pre-estrogen replacement.

    Project Director
    Project F: Genomic Analysis in narcolepsy cataplexy
    The goal of the project is to locate genes outside the HLA region that influence susceptibility to narcolepsy. In order to localize these genes we will carry out a linkage and association study in the most extensive world-wide collection of DNAs from well-characterized patients with narcolepsy and their families.

  • Casey H. Halpern, MD

    Casey H. Halpern, MD

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are currently investigating the effects of deep brain stimulation in obesity using mouse models of human behavior. Many obese individuals exhibit behavioral disinhibition, a clinical feature of many neurologic and psychiatric conditions. We are dissecting the mesocorticolimbic circuit with novel techniques including optogenetics.

  • May Han, MD

    May Han, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMultiple sclerosis
    Neuromyelitis optica
    Autoimmune CNS disorders

  • Antonio Hardan, M.D.

    Antonio Hardan, M.D.

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe neurobiology of autism
    Neuroimaging in individuals with autism
    Psychopharmacological treatment of children and adults with autism and/or developmental disorders
    The neurobiology and innovative interventions of several neurogenic disorders including DiGeorge Syndrome (Velocardiofacial syndrome; 22q11.2 mutations), PTEN mutations, and Phelan McDermid Syndrome (22q13 mutations).

  • Keren Haroush

    Keren Haroush

    Assistant Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory studies the mechanisms by which highly complex behaviors are mediated at the neuronal level, mainly focusing on the example of dynamic social interactions and the neural circuits that drive them. From dyadic interactions to group dynamics and collective decision making, the lab seeks a mechanistic understanding for the fundamental building blocks of societies, such as cooperation, empathy, fairness and reciprocity.

  • James Harris

    James Harris

    James and Elenor Chesebrough Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Applied Physics

    BioHarris utilizes molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of III-V compound semiconductor materials to investigate new materials for electronic and optoelectronic devices. He utilizes heterojunctions, superlattices, quantum wells, and three-dimensional self-assembled quantum dots to create metastable engineered materials with novel or improved properties for electronic and optoelectronic devices. He has recently focused on three areas: 1) integration of photonic devices and micro optics for creation of new minimally invasive bio and medical systems for micro-array and neural imaging and 2) application of nanostructures semiconductors for the acceleration of electrons using light, a dielectric Laser Accelerator (DLA), and 3) novel materials and nano structuring for high efficiency solar cells and photo electrochemical water splitting for the generation of hydrogen.

  • Trevor Hastie

    Trevor Hastie

    John A. Overdeck Professor, Professor of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFlexible statistical modeling for prediction and representation of data arising in biology, medicine, science or industry. Statistical and machine learning tools have gained importance over the years. Part of Hastie's work has been to bridge the gap between traditional statistical methodology and the achievements made in machine learning.

  • Zihuai He

    Zihuai He

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Neurology and of Medicine (BMIR)

    BioDr. He received his PhD from the University of Michigan in 2016. Following a postdoctoral training in biostatistics at Columbia University, he joined Stanford University as an assistant professor of neurology and of medicine in 2018. His research is concentrated in the area of statistical genetics and integrative analysis of omics data, with the aim of developing novel statistical and computational methodologies for the identification and interpretation of complex biological pathways involved in human diseases, particularly neurological disorders. His methodology interest includes high-dimensional data analysis, correlated (longitudinal, familial) data analysis and machine learning algorithms.

  • Boris Heifets

    Boris Heifets

    Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult MSD) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHarnessing synaptic plasticity to treat neuropsychiatric disease

  • Sarah Heilshorn

    Sarah Heilshorn

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProtein engineering
    Tissue engineering
    Regenerative medicine
    Biomaterials

  • Jeremy J. Heit, MD, PhD

    Jeremy J. Heit, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Neuroimaging and Neurointervention) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research seeks to advance our understanding of cerebrovascular disease and to develop new minimally invasive treatments for these diseases. We study ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, cerebral aneurysms, delayed cerebral ischemia, cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), dural arteriovenous fistulae, and other vascular diseases of the brain. We use state-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques to non-invasively study these diseases, and we are developing future endovascular technologies to advance neurointerventional surgery.

    www.heitlab.com

  • H. Craig Heller

    H. Craig Heller

    Lorry I. Lokey/Business Wire Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeurobiology of sleep, circadian rhythms, regulation of body temperature, mammalian hibernation, and human exercise physiology. Currently applying background in sleep and circadian neurobiology the understanding and correcting the learning disability of Down Syndrome.

  • Stefan Heller

    Stefan Heller

    Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on the inner ear, from its earliest manifestation as one of the cranial placodes until it has developed into a mature and functioning organ. We are interested how the sensory epithelia of the inner ear that harbor the sensory hair cells develop, how the cells mature, and how these epithelia respond to toxic insults. The overarching goal of this research is to find was to regenerate lost sensory hair cells in mammals.

  • Jaimie Henderson, MD

    Jaimie Henderson, MD

    John and Jene Blume - Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor, Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests encompass several areas of stereotactic and functional neurosurgery, including frameless stereotactic approaches for therapy delivery to deep brain nuclei; cortical physiology and its relationship to normal and pathological movement; brain-computer interfaces; and the development of novel neuromodulatory techniques for the treatment of movement disorders, epilepsy, pain, and other neurological diseases.

  • Victor W. Henderson, MD, MS

    Victor W. Henderson, MD, MS

    Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests:
    (1) Risk factors for age-associated cognitive decline and for dementia.
    (2) Therapeutic strategies to improve cognitive function in aging and in dementia.
    (3) Brain-–behavior relations as they pertain to human cognition.

  • Tina Hernandez-Boussard

    Tina Hernandez-Boussard

    Associate Professor (Research) of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics), of Biomedical Data Science and of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy background and expertise is in the field of computational biology, with concentration in health services research. A key focus of my research is to apply novel methods and tools to large clinical datasets for hypothesis generation, comparative effectiveness research, and the evaluation of quality healthcare delivery. My research involves managing and manipulating big data, which range from administrative claims data to electronic health records, and applying novel biostatistical techniques to innovatively assess clinical and policy related research questions at the population level. This research enables us to create formal, statistically rigid, evaluations of healthcare data using unique combinations of large datasets.

  • Lambertus Hesselink

    Lambertus Hesselink

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioHesselink's research encompasses nano-photonics, ultra high density optical data storage, nonlinear optics, optical super-resolution, materials science, three-dimensional image processing and graphics, and Internet technologies.

  • Shaul Hestrin, PhD

    Shaul Hestrin, PhD

    Professor of Comparative Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe main interest of my lab is to understand how the properties of neocortical neurons, the circuits they form and the inputs they receive give rise to neuronal activity and behavior. Our approach includes behavioral studies, two-photon calcium imaging, in vivo whole cell recording in behaving animals and optogenetic methods to activate or to silence the activity of cortical neurons.

  • Karen G. Hirsch, MD

    Karen G. Hirsch, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Karen G. Hirsch cares for critically ill patients with neurologic disorders in the intensive care unit and for patients with cerebrovascular disease in the inpatient stroke unit. Dr. Hirsch's research focuses on novel imaging techniques such as functional brain imaging in patients with cardiac arrest and traumatic brain injury. She also studies methods of non-invasive measurement of cerebral blood flow, oxygenation, and cerebrovascular autoregulation and how these parameters might be targeted to improve outcome in patients with neurologic injury. In the outpatient clinic, she sees patients with head injury, stroke and other neurovascular diseases in addition to patients who have been discharged from the neurological intensive care unit.

  • Susan Holmes

    Susan Holmes

    Professor of Statistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab has been developing tools for the analyses of complex data structures, extending work on multivariate data to structured multitable table that include graphs, networks and trees as well as categorical and continuous measurements.
    We created and support the Bioconductor package phyloseq for the analyses of microbial ecology data from the microbiome. We have specialized in developing interactive graphical visualization tools for doing reproducible research in biology.

  • Guosong Hong

    Guosong Hong

    Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioGuosong Hong's research aims to bridge materials science and neuroscience, and blur the distinction between the living and non-living worlds by developing novel neuroengineering tools to interrogate and manipulate the brain in a minimally invasive way.

    Guosong received his Ph.D. degree in chemistry from Stanford University in 2014 under the advice of Prof. Hongjie Dai. His Ph.D. research focused on the development of a new fluorescence imaging method in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II window, 1,000-1,700 nm) to afford deep-tissue penetration in the brain and other biological tissues. During his postdoctoral training at Harvard University with Prof. Charles Lieber, Guosong developed tissue-like mesh electronics neural probes to interrogate the brain and the retina with chronic stability, and is a recipient of the American Heart Association (AHA) Postdoctoral Fellowship and the NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00). Guosong joined the Stanford faculty in September 2018, and is an assistant professor of Materials Science and Engineering, and the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute.

  • Mark Horowitz

    Mark Horowitz

    Yahoo! Founders Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Computer Science

    BioProfessor Horowitz's initially focused on designing high-performance digital systems by combining work in computer-aided design tools, circuit design, and system architecture. During this time, he built a number of early RISC microprocessors, and contributed to the design of early distributed shared memory multiprocessors. In 1990, Dr. Horowitz took leave from Stanford to help start Rambus Inc., a company designing high-bandwidth memory interface technology. After returning in 1991, he research group pioneered many innovations in high-speed link design, and many of today’s high speed link designs are designed by his former students or colleagues from Rambus.

    In the 2000s he started a long collaboration with Prof Levoy on computation photography, that included work that led to the Lytro camera. Dr. Horowitz's current research interests are quite broad and span using EE and CS analysis methods to problems in neuro and molecular biology to creating new agile design methodologies for analog and digital VLSI circuits. He remains interested in learning new things, and building interdisciplinary teams.

  • SM Hadi Hosseini

    SM Hadi Hosseini

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab’s research portfolio crosses multiple disciplines including computational neuropsychiatry, cognitive neuroscience, multimodal neuroimaging and neurocognitive rehabilitation. Our computational neuropsychiatry research mainly involves investigating alterations in the organization of connectome in various neurodevelopmental and neurocognitive disorders using state of the art neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, sMRI, DWI, functional NIRS) combined with novel computational methods (graph theoretical and multivariate pattern analyses).

    The ultimate goal of our research is to translate the findings from computational neuropsychiatry research toward developing personalized interventions. We have been developing personalized interventions that integrate computerized cognitive rehabilitation, real-time functional brain imaging and neurofeedback, as well as virtual reality (VR) tailored toward targeted rehabilitation of the affected brain networks in patients with neurocognitive disorders.

  • Roger Howe

    Roger Howe

    William E. Ayer Professor in Electrical Engineering

    BioDesign and fabrication of sensors and actuators using micro and nanotechnologies, with applications to information processing and energy conversion.

  • Yang Hu, MD, PhD

    Yang Hu, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe ultimate goal of the laboratory is to develop efficient therapeutic strategies to achieve CNS neural repair, through promoting neuroprotection, axon regeneration and functional recovery.

    More specifically, we study retinal ganglion cell (RGC) and optic nerve in various optic neuropathies including traumatic, glaucomatous and inflammatory optic nerve injuries to fully understand the molecular mechanisms of CNS neurodegeneration and axon regeneration failure.

  • Ting-Ting Huang

    Ting-Ting Huang

    Associate Professor (Research) of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the role of oxygen free radicals in oxidative tissue damage and degeneration. Our research tools include transgenic and knockout mice and tissue culture cells for in vitro gene expression.

  • Andrew D. Huberman

    Andrew D. Huberman

    Associate Professor of Neurobiology and of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) We study the mechanisms of neural degeneration and regeneration with the specific goal of developing treatments to prevent and reverse vision loss. (e.g., Laha and Huberman, Science, 2017; Lim et al., Nature Neuroscience, 2016).

    2) We study the neural circuits that merge visual perceptions with internal states, to drive adaptive behavioral decisions. We are parsing the neural circuits related to anxiety, and visually-driven autonomic arousal (e.g., Salay et al., Nature, 2018).

  • John Huguenard

    John Huguenard

    Professor of Neurology, of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in the neuronal mechanisms that underlie synchronous oscillatory activity in the thalamus, cortex and the massively interconnected thalamocortical system. Such oscillations are related to cognitive processes, normal sleep activities and certain forms of epilepsy. Our approach is an analysis of the discrete components (cells, synapses, microcircuits) that make up thalamic and cortical circuits, and reconstitution of components into in silico computational networks.

  • Keith Humphreys

    Keith Humphreys

    Esther Ting Memorial Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Humphreys researches interventions for substance abuse and psychiatric disorders. He focuses particularly on evaluating the outcomes of professionally-administered treatments and peer-operated self-help groups (e.g., Alcoholics Anonymous), developing health services research-related applications for innovative qualitative and quantitative research techniques, and analyzing national mental health policy.