Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute


Showing 1-20 of 59 Results

  • Debra Safer

    Debra Safer

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary research interests include the nature and treatment of eating disorders
    (particularly bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder), the development and treatment of obesity, and the development and treatment of problematic eating patterns in patients following bariatric surgery.

  • Manish Saggar

    Manish Saggar

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are a computational neuropsychiatry lab dedicated to developing computational methods to better understand brain’s overall dynamical organization in healthy and patient populations. We employ algorithms from a wide range of fields, including Applied Mathematics, Econometrics, Machine Learning, Biophysics, and Network Science.

  • Gregory Lee Sahlem

    Gregory Lee Sahlem

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology)

    BioDr.Sahlem is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He is board-certified in general psychiatry and addictions medicine, as well as fellowship-trained in the research and clinical application of neuromodulation-based treatments including repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS), electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). He additionally has advanced training in the treatment of mood and sleep disorders. In addition to being an active clinician, Dr.Sahlem is a member of the Stanford Brain Stimulation Lab and directs the Addictions Research Section of the Lab.

    Major areas of study for Dr.Sahlem include: The development of rTMS as a focused treatment for addictive disorders; the development of a novel form of ECT theorized to have reduced cognitive side effects, Focal Electrically Administered Seizure Therapy (FEAST), and; the further development of rTMS for the treatment of mood disorders.

  • Alberto Salleo

    Alberto Salleo

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNovel materials and processing techniques for large-area and flexible electronic/photonic devices. Polymeric materials for electronics, bioelectronics, and biosensors. Electrochemical devices for neuromorphic computing. Defects and structure/property studies of polymeric semiconductors, nano-structured and amorphous materials in thin films. Advanced characterization techniques for soft matter.

  • Julia Salzman

    Julia Salzman

    Associate Professor of Biomedical Data Science, of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Statistics and of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsstatistical computational biology focusing on splicing, cancer and microbes

  • Niyatee Samudra, MD

    Niyatee Samudra, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Samudra is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She specializes in the care of patients with memory disorders and epilepsy. She has completed fellowship training in behavioral neurology at the University of California, San Francisco, as well as in epilepsy and clinical neurophysiology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Dr. Samudra is board-certified in neurology and in epilepsy.

    Her research interests include clinical trials in memory disorders and epilepsy; early neurophysiological markers of Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders; neuropsychiatric symptoms in neurodegenerative disorders; and the cognitive and neuropsychiatric consequences of epilepsy. She is interested in improving neurologic care for underserved populations.

    Dr. Samudra has published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease; Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports; Journal of the Neurological Sciences; Seizure; and Epilepsy and Behavior, among others. She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

  • Peter L. Santa Maria, MBBS, PhD

    Peter L. Santa Maria, MBBS, PhD

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering
    On Partial Leave from 08/01/2023 To 07/14/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study chronic suppurative otitis media, a chronic biofilm infection of the middle ear predominantly involving pseudomonas and staph aureus. We are investigating mechanisms of sensory hearing loss, host microbe interactions and trialling novel therapeutics.

    Our work in tympanic membrane regeneration has entered clinical trials.

    Novel treatments for wound healing in intra oral wounds with potential applications to prevent post tonsillectomy wound healing and oral mucositis.

  • Robert Sapolsky

    Robert Sapolsky

    John A. and Cynthia Fry Gunn Professor, Professor of Biology, of Neurology and of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeuron death, stress, gene therapy

  • Ansuman Satpathy

    Ansuman Satpathy

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab works at the interface of immunology, cancer biology, and genomics to study cellular and molecular mechanisms of the immune response to cancer. In particular, we are leveraging high-throughput genomic technologies to understand the dynamics of the tumor-specific T cell response to cancer antigens and immunotherapies (checkpoint blockade, CAR-T cells, and others). We are also interested in understanding the impact of immuno-editing on the heterogeneity and clonal evolution of cancer.

    We previously developed genome sequencing technologies that enable epigenetic studies in primary human immune cells from patients: 1) 3D enhancer-promoter interaction profiling (Nat Genet, 2017), 2) paired epigenome and T cell receptor (TCR) profiling in single cells (Nat Med, 2018), 3) paired epigenome and CRISPR profiling in single cells (Cell, 2019), and high-throughput single-cell ATAC-seq in droplets (Nature Biotech, 2019). We used these tools to study fundamental principles of the T cell response to cancer immunotherapy (PD-1 blockade) directly in cancer patient samples (Nature Biotech, 2019; Nat Med, 2019).

  • Alan F. Schatzberg

    Alan F. Schatzberg

    Kenneth T. Norris, Jr. Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiological bases of depressive disorders;, glucocorticoid/dopamine interactions in delusional depression;, pharmacologic treatment of depressive disorders.

  • David Schneider

    David Schneider

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study innate immunity and microbial pathogenesis. We have been studying models for a variety of bacterial infections including: Listeria, Mycobacteria, Salmonella and Streptococcus as well as some fungi, malaria and viruses. Our current focus is to determine how we recover from infections.

  • Mark J. Schnitzer

    Mark J. Schnitzer

    Professor of Biology, of Applied Physics and of Neurosurgery (Adult Neurosurgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of our research is to advance experimental paradigms for understanding normal cognitive and disease processes at the level of neural circuits, with emphasis on learning and memory processes. To advance these paradigms, we invent optical brain imaging techniques, several of which have been widely adopted. Our neuroscience studies combine these imaging innovations with behavioral, electrophysiological, optogenetic and computational methods, enabling a holistic approach to brain science.

  • Birgitt Schuele

    Birgitt Schuele

    Associate Professor (Research) of Pathology

    BioBirgitt Schüle, MD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on medical genetics and stem cell modeling to uncover disease mechanisms and pathways involved in neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease and related disorders. She is dedicated to developing novel therapeutic strategies that contribute to the advancement of precision medicine.
    Dr. Schüle obtained her medical training from the Georg-August University Göttingen and Medical University Lübeck, Germany, between 1993 and 2001. She earned her doctoral degree in medicine (Dr. med.) in neurophysiology from the Georg-August University Göttingen in 2001. During her neurology internship from 2001 to 2002 at the Medical University of Lübeck under the guidance of Prof. Christine Klein. Subsequently, she pursued a postdoctoral fellowship in human genetics with Prof. Uta Francke at Stanford University School of Medicine from 2003 to 2005.
    From 2005 to 2019, Dr. Schüle demonstrated leadership in spearheading critical clinical research programs and establishing essential biospecimen repositories for neurogenetics, translational stem cell research, and brain donation at the Parkinson's Institute and Clinical Center.
    Currently, Dr. Schüle serves as the Associate Core Leader, Neuropathology, within the Stanford Alzheimer Research Center (ADRC). Her contributions to ADRC include genetic characterization, biobanking, and the establishment of a human induced pluripotent stem cell and post-mortem leptomeninges tissue bank. These resources are shared with the data and tissue repositories at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), facilitating collaborative research and advancing our understanding of neurodegenerative diseases.
    Dr. Schüle's expertise and dedication in the field of neurodegeneration contribute significantly to the advancement of medical knowledge. She is recognized as a respected member of the scientific community, playing an important role in the pursuit of effective treatments and precision medicine approaches.

  • Daniel Schwartz

    Daniel Schwartz

    Dean of the Graduate School of Education and the Nomellini & Olivier Professor of Educational Technology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInstructional methods, transfer of learning and assessment, mathematical development, teachable agents, cognition, and cognitive neuroscience.

  • Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical interests involve inpatient and outpatient care of patients with neurovascular diseases, mostly ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. I have a particular interest in cervical artery dissection, non-atherosclerotic vasculopathies, and stroke in the young.

  • Matthew P. Scott

    Matthew P. Scott

    Professor of Developmental Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research has been focused on the genetic regulation of animal development and its relation to birth defects, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We studied mechanisms and functions of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, which controls cell fates and growth, in the context of normal development and brain cancer. We studied a neurodegenerative disease, Niemann-Pick C syndrome, that affects intracellular organelle movements and sterol homeostasis. Due to Dr. Scott's new job, the lab is no longer active.

  • Vittorio Sebastiano

    Vittorio Sebastiano

    Associate Professor (Research) of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe thread of Ariadne that connects germ cells, preimplatation development and pluripotent stem cells is the focus of my research, with a specific interest in human development. My long-term goals are: 1. Understanding the biology of germ cells and and their ability to sustain early preimplantation development; 2. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate very early cell fate decisions in human embryos; 3. Understanding the biology of derivation and maintenance of Pluripotent Stem Cells

  • Kawin Setsompop

    Kawin Setsompop

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioKawin Setsompop is an Associate Professor of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering. His research focuses on the development of novel MRI acquisition methods, with the goal of creating imaging technologies that can be used to help better understand brain structure and function for applications in Healthcare and Health sciences. He received his Master’s degree in Engineering Science from Oxford University and his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT. Prior to joining Stanford, he was a postdoctoral fellow and subsequently a faculty at the A.A. Martinos center for biomedical imaging, MGH, as well as part of the Harvard and MIT faculty. His group has pioneered several widely-used MRI acquisition technologies, a number of which have been successfully translated into FDA-approved clinical products on Siemens, GE, Phillips, United Imaging and Bruker MRI scanners worldwide. These technologies are being used daily to study the brain in both clinical and neuroscientific fields.