School of Engineering


Showing 1-20 of 54 Results

  • Bruce Cahan

    Bruce Cahan

    Lecturer

    BioBruce Cahan is a Lecturer in Stanford University's Management Science and Engineering Department, a Distinguished Scholar at Stanford's Human-Sciences and Technologies Advanced Research Institute's mediaX Program, and an active member of CodeX Fellow at Stanford’s Center for Legal Informatics. Bruce's course offerings at Stanford include Ethics of Finance and Financial Engineering (MS&E 148), Investing on the Buy Side of Wall Street (MS&E 449), Sustainable Banking (CEE 244A) and Redesigning Post-Disaster Finance (d.school pop out).. As an Ashoka Fellow through Urban Logic, Bruce is creating the Space Commodities Exchange, GoodBank™(IO), an independent teaching bank for high-transparency, impacts-aware commercial bankers, and other projects.

  • Wei Cai

    Wei Cai

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioPredicting mechanical strength of materials through theory and simulations of defect microstructures across atomic, mesoscopic and continuum scales. Developing new atomistic simulation methods for long time-scale processes, such as crystal growth and self-assembly. Introducing magnetic field in quantum simulations of electronic structure and transport.

  • David Camarillo

    David Camarillo

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Mechanical Engineering

    BioDavid B. Camarillo is Assistant Professor of Bioengineering, (by courtesy) Mechanical Engineering and Neurosurgery at Stanford University. Dr. Camarillo holds a B.S.E in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University, a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University and completed postdoctoral fellowships in Biophysics at the UCSF and Biodesign Innovation at Stanford. Dr. Camarillo worked in the surgical robotics industry at Intuitive Surgical and Hansen Medical, before launching his laboratory at Stanford in 2012. His current research focuses on precision human measurement for multiple clinical and physiological areas including the brain, heart, lungs, and reproductive system. Dr. Camarillo has been awarded the Hellman Fellowship, the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program award, among other honors including multiple best paper awards in brain injury and robotic surgery. His research has been funded by the NIH, NSF, DoD, as well as corporations and private philanthropy. His lab’s research has been featured on NPR, the New York Times, The Washington Post, Science News, ESPN, and TED.com as well as other media outlets aimed at education of the public.

  • Emmanuel Candes

    Emmanuel Candes

    Barnum-Simons Chair in Math and Statistics, and Professor of Statistics and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioEmmanuel Candès is the Barnum-Simons Chair in Mathematics and Statistics, a professor of electrical engineering (by courtesy) and a member of the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering at Stanford University. Earlier, Candès was the Ronald and Maxine Linde Professor of Applied and Computational Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology. His research interests are in computational harmonic analysis, statistics, information theory, signal processing and mathematical optimization with applications to the imaging sciences, scientific computing and inverse problems. He received his Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University in 1998.

    Candès has received several awards including the Alan T. Waterman Award from NSF, which is the highest honor bestowed by the National Science Foundation, and which recognizes the achievements of early-career scientists. He has given over 60 plenary lectures at major international conferences, not only in mathematics and statistics but in many other areas as well including biomedical imaging and solid-state physics. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2014.

  • Brian Cantwell

    Brian Cantwell

    Edward C. Wells Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Cantwell's research interests are in the area of turbulent flow. Recent work has centered in three areas: the direct numerical simulation of turbulent shear flows, theoretical studies of the fine-scale structure of turbulence, and experimental measurements of turbulent structure in flames. Experimental studies include the development of particle-tracking methods for measuring velocity fields in unsteady flames and variable density jets. Research in turbulence simulation includes the development of spectral methods for simulating vortex rings, the development of topological methods for interpreting complex fields of data, and simulations of high Reynolds number compressible and incompressible wakes. Theoretical studies include predictions of the asymptotic behavior of drifting vortex pairs and vortex rings and use of group theoretical methods to study the nonlinear dynamics of turbulent fine-scale motions. Current projects include studies of fast-burning fuels for hybrid propulsion and decomposition of nitrous oxide for space propulsion.

  • Shuo Cao

    Shuo Cao

    Visiting Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering

    BioShuo Cao received the Ph.D. in condensed matter physics from the Institute of Physics (IOP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS), Beijing, China in 2015. He obtained the M.Sc. degree in theoretical physics in 2004 and the B.Sc. degree in physics in 2000 from the School of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang, China.
    Since 2004, he has been on the Faculty at Liaoning University, Shenyang and currently holds the position of Associate professor in the Department of Fundamental Physics, School of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang, where he is currently serving as Chair of the Department.
    Dr. Cao was awarded the outstanding undergraduate experimental teaching prize in Liaoning University in 2018, the Teaching Achievement Prizes at the undergraduate course of University education in Liaoning Province in 2018, an Academic Achievement Award of academic paper in Shenyang City in 2018, an Academic Achievement Award of academic paper in Liaoning Province in 2017, the Miyoshi student pacesetter of University of Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2015, the Director Scholarship Award in Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2014, Miyoshi student of University of Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2013, the Director Scholarship Award in Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2013, the Excellent Posted Report Award of Chinese Society of Physics Fall Academic Conference in 2013.
    In 2019, he is awarded a scholarship under State Scholarship Fund to study in the United States of America as a Visiting Scholar from China Scholarship Council (CSC), and he has been appointed as a Visiting Associate Professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering in the School of Engineering, Stanford University.
    His research fields are the electronic and optical properties of low-dimensional materials, such as zero-dimensional quantum dot (QD), two-dimensional graphene (GR), and hybrid QD-GR materials and optoelectronic devices. Recently, he is particularly interested in analyzing and understanding energy band coupling and intrinsic charge transfer, transition micro-mechanisms of hybrid low-dimensional materials and optoelectronic devices.

  • Mark A. Cappelli

    Mark A. Cappelli

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Cappelli is the author of over 100 papers in these areas. He is currently a member of the Editorial Board of Diamond Films and Technology. He is also secretary of the Electric Propulsion Technical Committee of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics.

  • Matteo Cargnello

    Matteo Cargnello

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioMatteo Cargnello is Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and Terman Faculty Fellow. His group research interests are in the preparation and use of uniform and tailored materials for heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis and the technological exploitation of nanoparticles and nanocrystals. Reactions of interest are related to sustainable energy generation and use, control of emissions of greenhouse gases, and better utilization of abundant building blocks (methane, biomass). Dr. Cargnello received his Ph.D. in Nanotechnology in 2012 at the University of Trieste (Italy) and he was then a post-doctoral scholar in the Chemistry Department at the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia) before joining the Faculty at Stanford. He is the recipient of the ENI Award Debut in Research 2013, the European Federation of Catalysis Societies Award as best European Ph.D. thesis in catalysis in 2013, and the Sloan Fellowship in 2018.

  • Gunnar Carlsson

    Gunnar Carlsson

    Ann and Bill Swindells Professor, Emeritus

    BioDr. Carlsson has been a professor of mathematics at Stanford University since 1991. In the last ten years, he has been involved in adapting topological techniques to data analysis, under NSF funding and as the lead PI on the DARPA “Topological Data Analysis” project from 2005 to 2010. He is the lead organizer of the ATMCS conferences, and serves as an editor of several Mathematics journals

  • Maureen Carroll

    Maureen Carroll

    Lecturer

    BioMaureen Carroll, Ph.D., is the Founder of Lime Design and a lecturer at Stanford’s Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (d.school) where she co-teaches Hacking Your Innovation Mindset and worked with the d.school Fellowship Program as a Design Ally. She was the Director of REDlab, which conducts research on the intersection of design thinking and learning at Stanford University from 2008-2016 and received a National Science Foundation grant. She was also a lecturer in Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education, where she co-taught Educating Young STEM Thinkers – a course that integrated design thinking and STEM and gave Stanford students the opportunity to mentor East Palo Alto middle schoolers. Carroll is an ethnographer who has published research in Design Studies, The International Journal of Art & Design Education, The Journal of Research in STEM Education, The Journal of Pre-College Engineering Education Research, and and has a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in Education: Language, Literacy and Culture.

  • J. Edward Carryer

    J. Edward Carryer

    Adjunct Professor

    BioEd Carryer graduated from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1975 with a BSE as a member of the first graduating class of the Education and Experience in Engineering Program. This innovative project-based learning program taught him that he could learn almost anything that he needed to know and set him on a path of lifelong learning. That didn’t, however, keep him from going back to school.

    Upon completion of his Master’s Degree in Bio-Medical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin Madison in 1978, he was seduced by his love of cars, and instead of going into medical device design, he went to work for Ford on the 1979 Turbocharged Mustang. In later programs at Ford, he got to apply the background that he had gained in electronics and microcontrollers during his graduate work to the 1983 Turbocharged Mustang and Thunderbird and the 1984 SVO Mustang. After leaving Ford, Ed worked on the design and implementation of engine control software for GM and on a stillborn development program to put a turbocharged engine into the Renault Alliance at AMC before deciding to return once again to school. At Stanford University, he did research in the engine lab and earned his PhD in 1992.

    While working on his PhD, Ed got involved in teaching the graduate course sequence in mechatronics that is known at Stanford as Smart Product Design. He took over teaching the courses first part time in 1989, then full time after completing his PhD. In teaching mechatronics, Ed seems to have found his calling. The integration of mechanical, electronic, and software design with teaching others how to use all of this to make new products hits all his buttons. He is currently a Consulting Professor and the Director of the Smart Product Design Lab (SPDL). He teaches graduate courses in mechatronics in the Mechanical Engineering department and an undergraduate course in mechatronics in the Electrical Engineering department.

    Since 1984, Ed has maintained a consultancy focused on helping firms apply electronics and software in the creation of integrated electromechanical solutions (in 1984, almost no one was using the term mechatronics).The projects that he has worked on include an engine controller for an outboard motor manufacturer, an automated blood gas analyzer, a turbocharger boost control system for a new type of turbocharger, and a heated glove for arctic explorers. His most recent project involved using ZigBee radios and local structural model evaluation to create a wireless network of intelligent sensors to monitor and evaluate the structural health of buildings and transportation infrastructure.

  • Carissa Carter

    Carissa Carter

    Adjunct Professor

    BioCarissa Carter is the Director of Teaching + Learning at the Stanford d.school. In this role she guides the development of the d.school’s pedagogy, leads its instructors, and shapes its class offering. She teaches courses on the intersection of data and design, design for climate change, and maps and the visual sorting of information.

  • Dennis R Carter

    Dennis R Carter

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Carter studies the influence of mechanical loading upon the growth, development, regeneration, and aging of skeletal tissues. Basic information from such studies is used to understand skeletal diseases and treatments. He has served as President of the Orthopaedic Research Society and is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

  • Lynette Cegelski

    Lynette Cegelski

    Associate Professor of Chemistry and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research program integrates chemistry, biology, and physics to investigate the assembly and function of macromolecular and whole-cell systems. The genomics and proteomics revolutions have been enormously successful in generating crucial "parts lists" for biological systems. Yet, for many fascinating systems, formidable challenges exist in building complete descriptions of how the parts function and assemble into macromolecular complexes and whole-cell factories. We are inspired by the need for new and unconventional approaches to solve these outstanding problems and to drive the discovery of new therapeutics for human disease.

    Our approach is different from the more conventional protein-structure determinations of structural biology. We employ biophysical and biochemical tools, and are designing new strategies using solid-state NMR spectroscopy to examine assemblies such as amyloid fibers, bacterial cell walls, whole cells, and biofilms. We would like to understand at a molecular and atomic level how bacteria self-assemble extracellular structures, including functional amyloid fibers termed curli, and how bacteria use such building blocks to construct organized biofilm architectures. We also employ a chemical genetics approach to recruit small molecules as tools to interrupt and interrogate the temporal and spatial events during assembly processes and to develop new strategies to prevent and treat infectious diseases. Overall, our approach is multi-pronged and provides training opportunities for students interested in research at the chemistry-biology interface.

  • Fu-Kuo Chang

    Fu-Kuo Chang

    Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    BioProfessor Chang's primary research interest is in the areas of multi-functional materials and intelligent structures with particular emphases on structural health monitoring, intelligent self-sensing diagnostics, and integrated health management for space and aircraft structures as well safety-critical assets and medical devices. His specialties include sensors and sensor network development, built-in self-diagnostics,  integrated diagnostics and prognostics, damage tolerance and failure analysis for composite materials, and advanced multi-physics computational methods for multi-functional structures. Most of his work involves system integration and multi-disciplinary engineering in structural mechanics, electrical engineering, signal processing, and multi-scale fabrication of materials. His recent research topics include: Integrated health management for aircraft structures, bio-inspired intelligent sensory materials for fly-by-feel autonomous vehicles, active sensing diagnostics for composite structures, self-diagnostics for high-temperature materials, etc.