School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-20 of 30 Results

  • Marisa Galvez

    Marisa Galvez

    Associate Professor of French and Italian and, by courtesy, of German Studies

    BioMarisa Galvez specializes in the literature of the Middle Ages in France and Western Europe, especially the poetry and narrative literature written in Occitan and Old French. Her areas of interest include the troubadours, vernacular poetics, the intersection of performance and literary cultures, and the critical history of medieval studies as a discipline. At Stanford, she currently teaches courses on medieval and Renaissance French literature and love lyric, as well as interdisciplinary upper level courses on the medieval imaginary in modern literature, film, and art.

    Her recent book, Songbook: How Lyrics Became Poetry in Medieval Europe (University of Chicago Press, 2012), treats what poetry was before the emergence of the modern category, “poetry”: that is, how vernacular songbooks of the thirteenth to fifteenth centuries shaped our modern understanding of poetry by establishing expectations of what is a poem, what is a poet, and what is lyric poetry itself. The first comparative study of songbooks, the book concerns three vernacular traditions—Occitan, Middle High German, and Castilian—and analyzes how the songbook emerged from its original performance context of oral publication, into a medium for preservation, and finally became a literary object that performs the interests of poets and readers. Her current research project, tentatively entitled "The Subject of Crusade: Penitential Poetics in Vernacular Lyric and Romance" examines how the crusader subject of vernacular literature sought to reconcile secular ideals about love and chivalry with crusade. This study places this literature in dialogue with new ideas about penance and confession that emerged from the second half of the twelfth century to the end of the thirteenth.

    Recent and forthcoming publications related to this project include "The Voice of the Unrepentant Crusader: 'Aler m'estuet' by the Châtelain d'Arras" (Voice and Voicelessness in Medieval Europe, ed. Irit Kleinman, Palgrave) that analyzes how a crusaders poet's unrepentant voice can be viewed as in tension with the confessional voice of pastoral literature, and "The Intersubjective Performance of Confession vs. Courtly Profession" (Performance and Theatricality in the MIddle Ages and Renaissance, ed. Markus Cruse, ACMRS) that compares penitential performativity and witnessing in courtly lyric and moral tales. "Jehan de Journi’s Disme de Penitanche and the Production of a Vernacular Confessional Text in Outremer" will appear in the volume Medieval Francophone Literary Culture Outside France (Brepols) and asks how a confessional text composed by a Cypriot Frank in the thirteenth century is shaped by the political and social contingencies of the Latin East.

    Her multi-year Performing Trobar project seeks to cultivate, historicize, and compare the experience of troubadour lyrics in literary and performative modes. In exposing students and the Stanford community to the rich aural and verbal texture of the medieval world, Performing Trobar seeks to animate our engagement with medieval lyric both as a philological artifact and as a vernacular art that continues to be translated before various audiences around the world. She also currently serves on the Executive Committee for the Discussion Group on Provençal Language and Literature of the Modern Language Association and acts as Faculty Coordinator of the Theoretical Perspectives of the Middle Ages workshop at the Stanford Humanities Center.

  • Angela Garcia

    Angela Garcia

    Associate Professor of Anthropology

    BioProfessor Garcia’s work engages historical and institutional processes through which violence and suffering is produced and lived. A central theme is the disproportionate burden of addiction, depression and incarceration among poor families and communities. Her research is oriented toward understanding how attachments, affect, and practices of intimacy are important registers of politics and economy.

    Garcia’s book, The Pastoral Clinic: Addiction and Dispossession Along The Rio Grande (University of California Press, 2010) received the 2012 Victor Turner Prize and a 2010 Pen Center USA Award. The Pastoral Clinic explores the relationship between intergenerational heroin use, poverty and colonial history in northern New Mexico. It argues that heroin addiction among Hispanos is a contemporary expression of an enduring history of dispossession, social and intimate fragmentation, and the existential desire for a release from these. Ongoing work in the U.S. explores processes of legal “re-entry” and intimate repair that incarcerated and paroled drug users undertake, particularly within kin networks.

    Professor Garcia is currently engaged in research in Mexico City that examines emerging social and discursive worlds related to the dynamics of extreme urban poverty, mental illness and drug addiction in Mexico City, particularly within its peripheral zones.

  • Gabriel Garcia, MD

    Gabriel Garcia, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe natural history of common viral liver diseases of man is poorly understood, despite the fact that chronic liver diseases of man may result in death from liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma.

  • Hector Garcia-Molina

    Hector Garcia-Molina

    Leonard Bosack and Sandra K. Lerner Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioGarcia-Molina's research interests include distributed computing systems, database systems, and digital libraries.

  • Justin Gardner

    Justin Gardner

    Assistant Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow does neural activity in the human cortex create our sense of visual perception? We use a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging, computational modeling and analysis, and psychophysical measurements to link human perception to cortical brain activity.

  • Hester Gelber

    Hester Gelber

    Professor of Religious Studies and, by courtesy, of German Studies, Emerita

    BioHester Gelber specializes in late medieval religious thought. She has taught courses on philosophy of religion as well as medieval Christianity. She has written extensively on medieval Dominicans, including: Exploring the Boundaries of Reason: Three Questions on the Nature of God by Robert Holcot OP and most recently It Could Have Been Otherwise: Contingency and Necessity in Dominican Theology at Oxford 1300-1350. She has now retired.

    Professor Gelber received her Ph.D. in History from the University of Wisconsin in 1974 and has taught at Stanford since 1978, beginning as a part-time lecturer in Philosophy before moving to Religious Studies in 1982.

  • Michael Genesereth

    Michael Genesereth

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    BioGenesereth is best known for his work on computational logic and applications of that work in enterprise management and electronic commerce. Basic research interests include knowledge representation, automated reasoning, and rational action. Current projects include logical spreadsheets, data, and service integration on the World Wide Web, and computational law.

  • Sharad Goel

    Sharad Goel

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Law

    BioSharad's primary area of research is computational social science, an emerging discipline at the intersection of computer science, statistics, and the social sciences. He's particularly interested in applying modern computational and statistical techniques to study social and political policies, such as stop-and-frisk, swing voting, filter bubbles, do-not-track, and media bias. Before joining Stanford, Sharad was a senior researcher at Microsoft Research and Yahoo Labs.

  • Laura Goode

    Laura Goode

    Lecturer, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

    BioLaura Goode is the author of the novel SISTER MISCHIEF (Candlewick Press, 2011), and the collection of poems BECOME A NAME (Fathom Books, 2016); she co-wrote and produced the feature film FARAH GOES BANG, which premiered at the 2013 Tribeca Film Festival and won the inaugural Nora Ephron Prize from Tribeca and Vogue. Her essays have appeared in Refinery29, BuzzFeed, ELLE, Glamour, New York Magazine, New Republic, Longreads, Catapult, and elsewhere. She received her BA and MFA from Columbia University and lives in San Francisco.

  • Deborah M Gordon

    Deborah M Gordon

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Deborah M Gordon studies the evolutionary ecology of collective behavior. Ant colonies operate without central control, using local interactions to regulate colony behavior.

  • Erica Gould

    Erica Gould

    Lecturer, International Relations

    BioErica Gould is the Director of the International Relations Honors Program, a lecturer in International Relations and also a lecturer in International Policy Studies at Stanford University. She has taught courses on honors thesis writing, international political economy and international organizations at Stanford for the past ten years. Previously, Dr. Gould was on the faculty at the University of Virginia, and has also taught courses on international relations at Johns Hopkins University and the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. Dr. Gould’s research has centered mainly around the question of how international organizations are controlled. She is currently working on a project concerning international organizational decision-making rules and also one on the accountability mechanisms associated with international organizations. Her publications include Money Talks: The International Monetary Fund, Conditionality and Supplementary Financiers (Stanford University Press, 2006), as well as numerous articles in academic journals and edited volumes. In addition to her research and teaching, Dr. Gould serves on the Board of Accountability Counsel, an international NGO based in San Francisco. She received her PhD in Political Science from Stanford University and her BA from Cornell University.

  • William Gow

    William Gow

    Lecturer, American Studies

    BioWilliam Gow is a San Francisco-based historian, educator, and documentary filmmaker. His major research interests include Asian American history, race and visual culture, and the history and culture of California and the Pacific World. His current book project, tentatively entitled "Performing Chinatown: Hollywood, Tourism, and the Making of a Los Angeles Community," examines the social, economic, and political contexts through which representations of Chinese Americans in Los Angeles were produced and consumed during the Chinese exclusion era. The book project draws on oral histories, archival research, and analysis of film and related visual culture.

    A proud product of San Francisco’s public school system, William holds an MA in Asian American Studies from UCLA and a PhD in Ethnic Studies from UC Berkeley. Prior to entering his doctoral program, William worked as a public school teacher in California. He also served as a community historian with the Chinese Historical Society of Southern California (CHSSC) in Los Angeles Chinatown. His first documentary More to the Chinese Side (co-directed with Sharon Heijin Lee in 2003) was nominated for the Golden Reel Award at the Visual Communications Asian American Film Festival in Los Angeles. His writing and research have appeared in a variety of publications including Pacific Historical Review, Amerasia Journal, and the CHSSC's Gum Saan Journal.

  • Mark Granovetter

    Mark Granovetter

    The Joan Butler Ford Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    BioMark Granovetter's main interest is in the way people, social networks and social institutions interact and shape one another. He has written extensively on this subject, including his two most widely cited articles "The Strength of Weak Ties" (1973) and "Economic Action and Social Structure: The Problem of Embeddedness" (1985). In recent years, his focus has been on the social foundations of the economy, and he is working on a book entitled Society and Economy, to be published by Harvard University Press in two volumes. The first volume, Society and Economy: Framework and Principles,appeared in 2017. It is broadly theoretical, treating the role in the economy of social networks, norms, culture, trust, power, and social institutions. The second volume will use this framework to illuminate the study of such important topics as corruption, corporate governance, organizational form and the emergence of new industries such as the American electricity industry and the high-tech industry of Silicon Valley.