School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1,321-1,340 of 1,353 Results

  • Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

    Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

    Professor of Iberian and Latin American Cultures, Emerita

    BioProfessor Yarbro-Bejarano is interested in Chicana/o cultural studies with an emphasis on gender and queer theory; race and nation; interrogating critical concepts in Chicana/o literature; and representations of race, sexuality and gender in cultural production by Chicanas/os and Latinas/os.

    She is the author of Feminism and the Honor Plays of Lope de Vega (1994), The Wounded Heart: Writing on Cherríe Moraga (2001), and co-editor of Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation (1991). She has published numerous articles on Chicana/o literature and culture. She teaches Introduction to Chicana/o Studies and a variety of undergraduate courses on literature, art, film/video, theater/performance and everyday cultural practices. Her graduate seminars include topics such as race and nation; interrogating critical concepts in Chicana/o literature; and representations of race, sexuality and gender in cultural production by Chicanas/os and Latinas/os.

    Since 1994, Professor Yarbro-Bejarano has been developing "Chicana Art," a digital archive of images focusing on women artists. Professor Yarbro-Bejarano is chair of the Chicana/o Studies Program in Stanford's Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.

  • Ali Yaycioglu

    Ali Yaycioglu

    Associate Professor of History

    BioAli Yaycioglu is a historian of the Ottoman Empire and Modern Turkey. His research centers on economic, political and legal institutions and practices as well as social and cultural life in southeastern Europe and the Middle East during the Ottoman Empire. He also has a research agenda on how people imagined, represented and recorded property, territory, and nature in early periods. Furthermore, Yaycioglu explores how we can use digital tools to understand, visualize and conceptualize these imaginations, representations and recordings. Yaycioglu’s first book, Partners of the Empire: Crisis of the Ottoman Order in the Age of Revolutions (Stanford University Press, 2016) offers a rethinking of the Ottoman Empire within the global context of the revolutionary age in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Currently Dr. Yaycioglu is working on a book project entitled The Ultimate Debt: State, Wealth and Death in the Ottoman Empire, in which he analyzes transformations in property, finance and statehood in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Ali Yaycioglu is the supervisor of a digital history project, Mapping Ottoman Epirus housed in Stanford’s Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis.

  • Yinyu Ye

    Yinyu Ye

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering
    On Leave from 10/01/2022 To 06/30/2023

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research interests include Continuous and Discrete Optimization, Algorithm Development and Analyses, Algorithmic Game/Market Theory and Mechanism-Design, Markov Decision Process and Reinforcement Learning, Dynamic/Online Optimization and Resource Allocation, and Stochastic and Robust Decision Making. These areas have been the unique and core disciplines of MS&E, and extended to new application areas in AI, Machine Learning, Data Science, and Business Analytics.

  • Lee Yearley

    Lee Yearley

    Walter Y. Evans-Wentz Professor of Oriental Philosophies, Religions and Ethics
    On Leave from 09/01/2022 To 03/31/2023

    BioLee Yearley works in comparative religious ethics and poetics, focusing on materials from China and the West. He is the author of The Ideas of Newman: Christianity and Human Religiosity and Mencius and Aquinas: Theories of Virtue and Conceptions of Courage (recently translated into Chinese), as well as numerous journal articles and essays in edited volumes.

    Professor Yearley holds a Ph.D. from University of Chicago.

  • Jason Yeatman

    Jason Yeatman

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics), of Education and of Psychology

    BioDr. Jason Yeatman is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education and Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at Stanford University. Dr. Yeatman completed his PhD in Psychology at Stanford where he studied the neurobiology of literacy and developed new brain imaging methods for studying the relationship between brain plasticity and learning. After finishing his PhD, he took a faculty position at the University of Washington’s Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences before returning to Stanford.

    As the director of the Brain Development and Education Lab, the overarching goal of his research is to understand the mechanisms that underlie the process of learning to read, how these mechanisms differ in children with dyslexia, and to design literacy intervention programs that are effective across the wide spectrum of learning differences. His lab employs a collection of structural and functional neuroimaging measurements to study how a child’s experience with reading instruction shapes the development of brain circuits that are specialized for this unique cognitive function.

  • Serkan Yolacan

    Serkan Yolacan

    Assistant Professor of Anthropology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSerkan Yolaçan’s research straddles anthropology and history to examine how transregional networks of business, religion, and education act as conduits of political change in the Middle East and Asia. His book project, Time Travelers of Baku: Conversion and Revolution in West Asia, brings to light the role of the Caucasus and its erstwhile Azeri diaspora in connecting the modern histories of Iran, Turkey, and Russia.

  • Janine Zacharia

    Janine Zacharia

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInterested in new forms of foreign correspondence, how stories go viral, the intersection between technology/social media and national security. Middle East/Israel is my main area of reporting expertise.

  • Jamil Zaki

    Jamil Zaki

    Associate Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the cognitive and neural bases of social behavior, and in particular on how people respond to each other's emotions (empathy), why they conform to each other (social influence), and why they choose to help each other (prosociality).

  • Richard Zare

    Richard Zare

    Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Natural Science and Professor, by courtesy, of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research group is exploring a variety of topics that range from the basic understanding of chemical reaction dynamics to the nature of the chemical contents of single cells.

    Under thermal conditions nature seems to hide the details of how elementary reactions occur through a series of averages over reagent velocity, internal energy, impact parameter, and orientation. To discover the effects of these variables on reactivity, it is necessary to carry out studies of chemical reactions far from equilibrium in which the states of the reactants are more sharply restricted and can be varied in a controlled manner. My research group is attempting to meet this tough experimental challenge through a number of laser techniques that prepare reactants in specific quantum states and probe the quantum state distributions of the resulting products. It is our belief that such state-to-state information gives the deepest insight into the forces that operate in the breaking of old bonds and the making of new ones.

    Space does not permit a full description of these projects, and I earnestly invite correspondence. The following examples are representative:

    The simplest of all neutral bimolecular reactions is the exchange reaction H H2 -> H2 H. We are studying this system and various isotopic cousins using a tunable UV laser pulse to photodissociate HBr (DBr) and hence create fast H (D) atoms of known translational energy in the presence of H2 and/or D2 and using a laser multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer to detect the nascent molecular products in a quantum-state-specific manner by means of an imaging technique. It is expected that these product state distributions will provide a key test of the adequacy of various advanced theoretical schemes for modeling this reaction.

    Analytical efforts involve the use of capillary zone electrophoresis, two-step laser desorption laser multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and Hadamard transform time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We believe these methods can revolutionize trace analysis, particularly of biomolecules in cells.

  • Evgeny Zatulovskiy

    Evgeny Zatulovskiy

    Basic Life Research Scientist

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCell cycle and cell size control in animal cells