School of Medicine


Showing 101-150 of 327 Results

  • Michael J. Bellino, MD

    Michael J. Bellino, MD

    Clinical Professor, Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bellino also serves as Clinical Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery with specialty interest in hip and pelvis reconstruction. His areas of clinical expertise include: pelvis and acetabulum fractures, periarticular and long bone fractures, malunions and nonunions, hip arthritis, hip dysplasia, and femoro-acetabular impingement. His research interests focus on anatomy and biomechanics of the hip and pelvis as well as surgical treatments for disorders of the hip.

  • Sean Bendall

    Sean Bendall

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur goal is to understand the mechanisms regulating the development of human systems. Drawing on both pluripotent stem cell biology, hematopoiesis, and immunology, combined with novel high-content single-cell analysis (CyTOF – Mass Cytometry) and imagining (MIBI-Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging) we are creating templates of ‘normal’ human cellular behavior to both discover novel regulatory events and cell populations as well as understand dysfunctional processes such as cancer.

  • Eran Bendavid

    Eran Bendavid

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEffect of global health policies on health of individuals in developing countries, global health, HIV and TB.

  • Edward Bender

    Edward Bender

    Clinical Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Edward Bender specializes in the treatment of adult cardiac abnormalities, including ischemic heart disease, structural and valvular disease, and arrhythmias. Additionally, he has an interest and expertise in General Thoracic and Vascular surgery. Dr. Bender currently works with organizations within the medical community to develop software to aid in the teaching and practice of medicine.

  • Catherine Benedict

    Catherine Benedict

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Medical Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on improving cancer survivorship through better understanding of long-term health outcomes and through the development of theoretically driven, evidence-based behavioral interventions to improve adjustment, risk management, and quality of life. To this end, I lead studies aimed to guide and support patient decision-making and self-management after cancer. Much of my work focuses on the experiences of young adults affected by cancer.

  • Ori-Michael Johanan Benhamou

    Ori-Michael Johanan Benhamou

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Benhamou received his Bachelor's degree at Duke University and went on to complete medical school at Ben-Gurion University. He completed his residency in Psychiatry at Westchester Medical Center and fellowship in Addiction Medicine at Stanford. He has published works in the areas of suicide, autoimmune encephalitis and addiction. His current interests include substance abuse, the role of transcranial magnetic stimulation on addiction and the intersection of suicide and substance abuse.

  • William Benitz

    William Benitz

    Philip Sunshine, M.D., Professor in Neonatology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeonatology, patent ductus arteriosus, pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, infant ventilation, neonatal clinical protocols/clinical pathways.

  • Jade Benjamin-Chung

    Jade Benjamin-Chung

    Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioJade Benjamin-Chung, PhD MPH, is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Department of Epidemiology and Population Health. Her research applies causal inference and machine learning techniques to study interventions to control, eliminate, or eradicate environmentally-transmitted infectious diseases, including interventions to prevent malaria, diarrhea, soil-transmitted helminths, and influenza. She is a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub Investigator and a recipient of a K01 Career Development Award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to estimate spillover effects of malaria eradication interventions in southern Africa (K01AI141616). She completed her graduate training in epidemiology and biostatistics at UC Berkeley and joined Stanford in May 2021.

  • Christopher Bennett

    Christopher Bennett

    Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine

    BioChristopher Bennett M.D. M.A. is a physician scientist in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Stanford University. He completed residency training at Harvard Medical School's program in Emergency Medicine based at Massachusetts General Hospital. Bennett graduated with honors from Winthrop University (B.S. in Biology), earned a graduate degree from Duke University (M.A. in Genetics and Genomics), and was awarded his medical degree (M.D.) from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Medicine. In addition to his formal graduate training, Bennett was previously a scientist with the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellow at Johns Hopkins’s McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, and a researcher with the Emergency Medicine Network based at Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Christopher previously served on the 2018-2019 Board of Directors for the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM); after his term on the Board, he was a member of the SAEM executive taskforce on Equity and Inclusion. He was subsequently a founding member of the SAEM Equity and Inclusion Committee, a position he continues to hold. He also served on the Massachusetts Medical Society's 2019-2020 Committee on Publications which directs the publication and distribution of the New England Journal of Medicine. His research has appeared in journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, and JAMA Surgery. His writing has appeared in The American Journal of Bioethics, STAT News, KevinMD.com, and Forbes.

  • Rachel Bensen

    Rachel Bensen

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on improving health care delivery systems for children, adolescents and young adults with chronic illness and their families. I have particular interests in the development of chronic disease self-management skills, assessment of patient reported outcomes, the transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care, and comprehensive programs to support families caring for a child with chronic illness.

  • Brandon S. Bentzley, MD, PhD

    Brandon S. Bentzley, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Bentzley received his bachelors in physics from The College of New Jersey. Upon graduating he spent a year conducting plasma physics research in a joint project between Princeton University and NASA. Brandon then turned his interests to neuroscience and began his training in the Medical Scientist Training Program (MD/PhD) at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). At MUSC Brandon completed his dissertation research with Gary Aston-Jones, PhD, studying the behavioral economics and neuroeconomics of substance use disorders. Simultaneously, he conducted clinical research on buprenorphine maintenance therapy, focusing on how patient perspectives influence treatment. Dr. Bentzley is now a psychiatrist and Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. His current research interests focus on the role of dopamine in economic decisions and developing neurostimulation-based treatments for severe depression and suicidality.

  • Jonathan S. Berek, MD, MMSc

    Jonathan S. Berek, MD, MMSc

    Laurie Kraus Lacob Professor

    BioLaurie Kraus Lacob Professor
    Stanford University School of Medicine

    Director, Stanford Women’s Cancer Center
    Senior Advisor, Stanford Cancer Institute

    Executive Director, Stanford Health Communication Initiative
    Director, MedArts Films
    Stanford Center for Health Education
    Stanford University

  • Marc Berg

    Marc Berg

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    BioDr. Berg was born and raised in rural Minnesota and has been in academic medicine since 1997. His research interests include CPR performance, pediatric defibrillation science, and education primarily through simulation. He has been a volunteer with the American Heart Association for more than 10 years, leading the Pediatric CPR course (PALS) in 2010. He has served in several administrative positions including Division Chief of Pediatric Critical Care at the University of Arizona, Board Director of the University of Arizona Health Network and Governor-appointed member of the Arizona Medical Board. In his free time he enjoys biking, reading and spending time with his family. He is married with three children and lives in Menlo Park, California.

    See his LinkedIn profile here:

    https://www.linkedin.com/in/marc-berg-6399934/

  • Ardin S. Berger

    Ardin S. Berger

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Berger is a pediatric pain physician who is ABA boarded in pain medicine, anesthesiology, and pediatric anesthesiology.

  • David Bergman

    David Bergman

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (General Pediatrics) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research has involved the use of new technologies to create different types of patient-doctor transactions. I am also interested in how these new transactions impact clinical care processes. Current work includes the evaluation of a patient portal for children with cystic fibrosis, the use of telemedicine to bring asthma experts into the schools and the attitudes of teens and parents about the use of a secure patient portal for teens.

  • Dominique Bergmann

    Dominique Bergmann

    Shirley R. and Leonard W. Ely, Jr. Professor of the School of Humanities and Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe use genetic, genomic and cell biological approaches to study cell fate acquisition, focusing on cases where cell fate is correlated with asymmetric cell division.

  • Michele Berk

    Michele Berk

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe focus of my research is on adolescent suicidal and self-harm behavior. I am currently one of four Principal Investigators of a multisite NIMH-sponsored RCT of DBT for adolescents at high risk for suicide (NCT01528020: Collaborative Adolescent Research on Emotions and Suicide [CARES], PI: Linehan, McCauley, Berk, & Asarnow) aimed at evaluating the efficacy of DBT with adolescents compared to a combined individual and group supportive therapy control condition (IGST).

  • Rebecca Bernert

    Rebecca Bernert

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

    BioI am an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and a licensed clinical psychologist in the Stanford University School of Medicine. I am a suicidologist, with subspecialty expertise in clinical trials, epidemiology, and suicide prevention best practices. I have joint specialty in behavioral sleep medicine and treatment development. I am founding Director of The Suicide Prevention Research Laboratory, and Co-Chair an initiative to establish a Stanford Center for Suicide Prevention. Our research program utilizes cognitive, biological (e.g., fMRI), and behavioral testing paradigms, with an emphasis on translational therapeutics across the lifespan. Our mission is to identify novel therapeutic targets for suicide prevention, including seminal work in establishing the subfield of sleep and suicide prevention. A special focus of our work is the development of rapid-action, low-risk interventions for the prevention of suicide. Our mission is to evaluate transdiagnostic risk factors and biomarkers underlying treatment response that may inform etiology, reduce stigma, and advance innovation. Advocating for its utility as a visible, yet non-stigmatizing warning sign of suicide—our earliest work delineated sleep as an evidence-based risk factor for suicidal behaviors. Funded by NIH and DOD, we subsequently conducted the first suicide prevention clinical trials, testing efficacy of a rapid-action (6 h) insomnia treatment for suicidal behaviors. These use a mechanisms focus to identify central disease processes (eg, underlying neural circuitry, behavioral factors) in the pathogenesis of risk for anti-suicidal response. An overarching aim is to harness new technologies to aid risk prediction, precision medicine, and intervention opportunity. We are also committed to improving national training practices and high risk monitoring of suicidal behaviors (e.g., national needs-assessment of medical training parameters; use of AI for suicide prevention; study of sleep as an ER target to enhance acute intervention).

    Regarding translation to policy, I have served as a content expert for nationally-directed health initiatives with NIH, VA, DOD, DARPA, SAMHSA, CDC, and The White House. I recently led development of the CA 2020 Statewide Strategy for Suicide Prevention, following invited testimony (CA State Assembly) and a commissioned Policy Brief on suicide prevention best practices. Additional advisory and advocacy work centers on how research guides public health policy and implementation. I am especially committed to initiatives that promise impact to suicide prevention on a broad scale, including universal strategies for lethal means restriction and real-time surveillance of suicidal behaviors. To this end, I have been honored to serve as a content expert to The White House Office of Science and Technology for initiatives focused on technology innovation and led advisory work promoting suicide deterrent systems for private organizations and public sites, such as the Golden Gate Bridge. I have consulted for technology companies, as well as private industry and healthcare partners. Last, inspired by maternity leaves coinciding with the above work, I have a separate research line examining organizational development, inclusive practices, and employee wellness. This addresses disparate impact of institutional and federal medical leave practices on recruitment and retention of women. Our program focuses on cost-effective policy for diversity training and reduced attrition of women in medicine, law, STEM and technology fields. As such, I am dedicated to spearheading development of a center for policy and inclusive practices, diversity, and equity education.

    To donate to our work or partner with us, please contact Stanford Medical Center Development at medicalgiving@stanford.edu to connect with us directly or to learn more about supporting our programs.

  • Daniel Bernstein

    Daniel Bernstein

    Alfred Woodley Salter and Mabel G. Salter Endowed Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to understand hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and heart failure associated with congenital heart disease.
    2. Role of alterations in mitochondrial dycamics and function in normal physiology and disease.
    3. Differences between R and L ventricular responses to stress,
    4. Immune biomarkers of risk after pediatric VAD implantation.
    5. Biomarkers for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  • Jon Bernstein

    Jon Bernstein

    Professor of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on the diagnosis, discovery and delineation of rare genetic conditions with a focus of neurodevelopmental disorders. This work includes the application of novel computational methods and multi-omics profiling (whole genome sequencing, RNA sequencing, metabolomics). I additionally participate in an interdisciplinary project to develop induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) models of genetic neurodevelopmental disorders..

  • William Berquist

    William Berquist

    Professor of Pediatrics (Gastroenterology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGastroenterology, gastointestinal motility, clinical management of pediatric liver transplant recipients.

  • Gerald Berry

    Gerald Berry

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiopulmonary and pulmonary transplant medicine; diagnostic surgical pathology

  • Mark Francis Berry, MD

    Mark Francis Berry, MD

    Mylavarapu Rogers Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    BioDr. Berry joined the Division of Thoracic Surgery at Stanford in August 2014. He came to Stanford from Duke University, where he had most recently served as Associate Professor. He received his medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine after receiving bachelors and masters degrees in Electrical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his residency in Cardiothoracic Surgery at Duke University Medical Center after performing a residency in General Surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. His Cardiothoracic Surgical training included a year dedicated to Minimally Invasive General Thoracic Surgery, a period that also included an American Association for Thoracic Surgery sponsored Traveling Fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh.

    Dr. Berry practices all aspects of thoracic surgery, including procedures for benign and malignant conditions of the lung, esophagus, and mediastinum. He has a particular interest in minimally invasive techniques, and has extensive experience in treating thoracic surgical conditions using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS), laparoscopic, robotic, endoscopic, and bronchoscopic approaches. He serves as the co-Director of the Stanford Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery Center (SMITS), and has both directed and taught in several minimally invasive thoracic surgery courses.

    Dr. Berry also has a Masters of Health Sciences in Clinical Research from Duke University. His clinical research activities mirror his clinical interests and activities in optimizing short-term and long-term outcomes of patients with thoracic surgical conditions. He has more than sixty peer-reviewed publications, most of which are related to both the use of minimally invasive thoracic surgical techniques as well as evaluating outcomes after treatment of thoracic malignancies. His clinical practice and his research both focus on choosing the most appropriate treatment and approach for patients based on the individual characteristics of the patient and their disease process.

  • Edward Bertaccini

    Edward Bertaccini

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    On Leave from 01/02/2022 To 05/07/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsmolecular modeling of anesthetic-protein interactions, molecular modeling of the ligand-gated ion channels

  • Alice Bertaina MD, PhD

    Alice Bertaina MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Bertaina is a highly experienced clinician and will play a key role in supporting Section Chief Dr. Rajni Agarwal and Clinical Staff in the Stem Cell Transplant Unit at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. She will also continue her research on immune recovery and miRNA, understanding the mechanisms underlying immune reconstitution, Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD), and leukemia relapse after allogeneic HSCT in pediatric patients affected by hematological malignant and non-malignant disorders.

  • Carolyn Bertozzi

    Carolyn Bertozzi

    Baker Family Director of Stanford ChEM-H, Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Radiology

    BioProfessor Carolyn Bertozzi's research interests span the disciplines of chemistry and biology with an emphasis on studies of cell surface sugars important to human health and disease. Her research group profiles changes in cell surface glycosylation associated with cancer, inflammation and bacterial infection, and uses this information to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most recently in the area of immuno-oncology.

    Dr. Bertozzi completed her undergraduate degree in Chemistry at Harvard University and her Ph.D. at UC Berkeley, focusing on the chemical synthesis of oligosaccharide analogs. During postdoctoral work at UC San Francisco, she studied the activity of endothelial oligosaccharides in promoting cell adhesion at sites of inflammation. She joined the UC Berkeley faculty in 1996. A Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator since 2000, she came to Stanford University in June 2015, among the first faculty to join the interdisciplinary institute ChEM-H (Chemistry, Engineering & Medicine for Human Health). She is now the Baker Family Director of Stanford ChEM-H.

    Named a MacArthur Fellow in 1999, Dr. Bertozzi has received many awards for her dedication to chemistry, and to training a new generation of scientists fluent in both chemistry and biology. She has been elected to the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and received the Lemelson-MIT Prize, the Heinrich Wieland Prize, the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, and the Chemistry of the Future Solvay Prize, among others.

    The Bertozzi Group develops chemical tools to study the glycobiology underlying diseases such as cancer, inflammation, tuberculosis and most recently COVID-19. She is the inventor of "bioorthogonal chemistry", a class of chemical reactions compatible with living systems that enable molecular imaging and drug targeting. Her group also developed new therapeutic modalities for targeted degradation of extracellular biomolecules, such as antibody-enzyme conjugates and Lysosome Targeting Chimeras (LYTACs). As well, her group studies NGly1 deficiency, a rare genetic disease characterized by loss of the human N-glycanase.

    Several of the technologies developed in the Bertozzi lab have been adapted for commercial use. Actively engaged with several biotechnology start-ups, Dr. Bertozzi cofounded Redwood Bioscience, Enable Biosciences, Palleon Pharmaceuticals, InterVenn Bio, OliLux Bio, Grace Science LLC and Lycia Therapeutics. She is also a member of the Board of Directors of Lilly.

  • Jill Beyer, OD

    Jill Beyer, OD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Ophthalmology

    BioJill Beyer, OD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Beyer graduated from Southern California College of Optometry, earning her Doctor of Optometry degree with distinction. She completed her residency at New England College of Optometry in Boston, Massachusetts, and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Oregon State University.

    Jill’s residency education included time spent at the Boston Foundation for Sight, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Cornea Consultants & Boston Laser Center, and Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates.

    After residency training, Jill continued on as a clinical preceptor at the New England College of Optometry while working in private practice in Boston. She then transitioned to full time academic work at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary becoming the Director of the Contact Lens Department and an Instructor in Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School.