School of Medicine


Showing 51-86 of 86 Results

  • Mildred Cho, PhD

    Mildred Cho, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Center for Biomedical Ethics) and of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Cho's major areas of interest include: ethical and social issues in genetic research, including those arising from gene therapy and editing, synthetic biology, microbiome research, the use of artificial intelligence to analyze genomic and medical data, the effects of gene patenting on clinical genetic testing and research, and the impacts of academic-industry ties on biomedical research.

  • Curtis R. Chong, MD, PhD, MPhil, FACP

    Curtis R. Chong, MD, PhD, MPhil, FACP

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Chong was recruited to Stanford from the Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) Cancer Center, where he led MSK's launch of the early drug development and immunotherapy clinical trials program in New Jersey. At MSK, Dr. Chong was a member of the gastrointestinal oncology service and was one of two MSK physicians in New Jersey who specialized in treating melanoma. Prior to joining MSK, Dr. Chong was a member of the thoracic oncology service at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and an attending physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital, all ailiates of Harvard Medical School.

    Dr. Chong completed his categorical residency in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, his oncology fellowship at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and is board-certified in internal medicine and medical oncology. He has received research support from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (Young Investigator Award), Uniting Against Lung Cancer, and the American Cancer Society. Dr. Chong has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Nature, Nature Medicine, Nature Chemical Biology, JAMA Oncology, and his research on drug discovery has been featured in the New York Times and Popular Science.

    Born and raised in Honolulu where he attended public schools, Dr. Chong sang in the Honolulu Boy Choir, and was the 1993 Honolulu Star Bulletin Newspaper Boy of the Year. He received his A.B. in biochemical sciences from Harvard University magna cum laude followed by an M.Phil. in Chemistry with Sir Alan Fersht at the University of Cambridge (Emmanuel College). He then received his MD and PhD in pharmacology from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

    An intrepid traveler and avid long-distance runner, Dr. Chong has visited 54 countries and completed 126 marathons in all 50 states, 18 countries, and 6 on continents.

  • Alvina Dor-Yan Chu

    Alvina Dor-Yan Chu

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioAlvina Chu, MD, is an adjunct clinical faculty member within the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology. She has practiced rheumatology for more than 10 years, specializing in treatment of a wide range of chronic inflammatory conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, vasculitis, and gout.

    She holds a longstanding scientific interest in immunology, especially the role of B-cell signaling mechanisms in lupus and other autoimmune diseases.

    In addition to taking care of patients in clinic and in the hospital, Dr. Chu enjoys teaching and mentoring fellows, residents, and medical students.

  • Gilbert Chu

    Gilbert Chu

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAfter shuttering the wet lab, we have focused on: a point-of-care device to measure blood ammonia and prevent brain damage; a human protein complex that juxtaposes and joins DNA ends for repair and V(D)J recombination; and strategies for teaching students and for reducing selection bias in educational programs.

  • Weihan Chu

    Weihan Chu

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    BioWeihan Chu, M.D., is a clinical assistant professor at Stanford School of Medicine. He completed his M.D. degree at Case Western Reserve University and his Internship and Residency at Stanford Hospital. He has been working at Stanford Health Care ValleyCare Hospital as an academic hospitalist since 2015.

    He serves as the Medical Informatics Director at SHC ValleyCare hospital and spends his time focused on leveraging technology to improve patient care. At SHC ValleyCare, he was the physician champion for the hospital's transition to electronic medical records and currently serves as the chair of the Physician IT Advisory Committee and the Clinical Decision Support Committee.

    He interested in hospital based quality improvement projects. His past projects include the sepsis initiative at Stanford hospital and minimizing delay in obtaining outside hospital records.

    In his spare time, he enjoys hiking, scuba diving, photography, and keeping up to date with the latest tech gadgets.

  • Katrin Chua

    Katrin Chua

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab is interested in understanding molecular processes that underlie aging and age-associated pathologies in mammals. We focus on a family of genes, the SIRTs, which regulate stress resistance and lifespan in lower organisms such as yeast, worms, and flies. In mammals, we recently uncovered a number of ways in which SIRT factors may contribute to cellular and organismal aging by regulating resistance to various forms of stress. We have now begun to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which these SIRT factors function. In particular, we are interested in how SIRT factors regulate chromatin, the molecular structure in which the DNA of mammalian genomes is packaged, and how such functions may link genome maintenance to stress resistance and aging.

  • Lorinda Chung

    Lorinda Chung

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology) and, by courtesy, of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests focus on all aspects of systemic sclerosis. I am currently involved in clinical, translational, and epidemiologic research in these areas, and dedicate a substantial portion of my research time to investigator-initiated and multi-center clinical trials of novel therapeutics for the treatment of systemic sclerosis.

  • Daniel Eugene Clark

    Daniel Eugene Clark

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Clark completed a 4-year MD/MPH program at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. He subsequently completed all of his post-graduate training at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC), including Internal Medicine-Pediatrics, Adult Cardiology, and Adult Congenital Heart Disease (ACHD). Additionally, he served as Chief Fellow of the Vanderbilt Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship, trained in multimodality cardiovascular imaging, and conducted clinical research during a two-year NIH-funded T32 research fellowship at VUMC.

    Prior to joining the Stanford ACHD faculty, he was appointed Instructor of Cardiovascular Medicine at Vanderbilt and read cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging as an attending for two years. He is appointed Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His academic and investigative interests focus on advanced cardiovascular imaging for ACHD patients, particularly the application of CMR in this population. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Dr. Clark pivoted his scholarly efforts to focus on studying the cardiovascular effects of COVID-19 with CMR. His current clinical investigations include understanding the CMR-derived diastolic patterns of Fontan physiology and the effect of cardiac rehabilitation on functional status among patients with Fontan failure.

  • John Clarke

    John Clarke

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioDr. John Clarke recently joined the Gastroenterology & Hepatology Division at Stanford University as Director of the Esophageal Program. He previously spent 17 years in Baltimore, including 9 years on the faculty at Johns Hopkins University where he was an Associate Professor and at various times Director of Esophageal Motility, Director of Gastrointestinal Motility, Clinical Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Neurogastroenterology, and Clinical Director of the Gastroenterology & Hepatology Division at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.

    His career has combined research, education and clinical care. His clinical areas of expertise include achalasia, dysphagia, eosinophilic esophagitis, esophageal dysmotility, gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastroparesis, GI-manifestations of scleroderma and GI dysmotility. While at Johns Hopkins University, he was inducted into The Miller-Coulson Academy for Clinical Excellence, an institutional honor society for master clinicians at the time limited to 50 members across the entire university.

    From an education standpoint, he has lectured in over a dozen countries, authored over 25 textbook chapters and serves on the educational affairs committee of the American College of Gastroenterology. He has also won several major teaching awards, including The Johns Hopkins University Alumni Association Award for Excellence in Teaching, given to one faculty member per year in the entire School of Medicine.

    His research has focused on optimization and characterization of diagnostic studies to evaluate motility disorders, as well the relationship between therapeutic endoscopic techniques and treatment of motility disorders. He was an investigator on the NIH Gastroparesis Consortium and is also a former recipient of the AGA Don Castell Award.

  • Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Karel H. and Avice N. Beekhuis Professor of Cancer Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Clarke maintains a laboratory focused on two areas of research: i) the control of self-renewal of normal stem cells and diseases such as cancer and hereditary diseases; and ii) the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells. His laboratory is investigating how perturbations of stem cell regulatory machinery contributes to human disease. In particular, the laboratory is investigating epigenetic regulators of self renewal, the process by which stem cells regenerate themselves.

  • Shoa L. Clarke, MD, PhD

    Shoa L. Clarke, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
    Instructor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    BioDr. Clarke is a preventive cardiologist and an instructor at Stanford University School of Medicine in the Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics. He earned his undergraduate degree in human biology from the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University before obtaining his MD and PhD (genetics) from Stanford University School of Medicine. He has completed clinical training in internal medicine (Brigham & Women’s Hospital), pediatrics (Boston Children’s Hospital), and cardiovascular medicine (Stanford Hospital), and he is board certified in all three specialties. His research is focused on 1) understanding complex disease genetics in diverse populations, 2) integrating monogenic and polygenic risk with clinical risk, 3) large-scale phenotyping using the electronic health record. His clinical practice focuses on identifying risk factors for cardiovascular disease with the goal of promoting health and longevity through evidence-based personalized treatment. He is interested in developing family-centric approaches for the treatment of adults and children carrying high genetic risk for disease.

  • William Clusin, MD

    William Clusin, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiac action potentials; tissue culture, voltage, clamp technique; role of calcium in ischemia arrhythmias; coronary, artery disease; myocardial infarction.

  • Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Stanley N. Cohen, MD

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Genetics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study mechanisms that affect the expression and decay of normal and abnormal mRNAs, and also RNA-related mechanisms that regulate microbial antibiotic resistance. A small bioinformatics team within our lab has developed knowledge based systems to aid in investigations of genes.

  • John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    John P. Cooke, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur translational research program in vascular regeneration is focused on generating and characterizing vascular cells from human induced pluripotential stem cells. We are also studying the therapeutic application of these cells in murine models of peripheral arterial disease. In these studies we leverage our longstanding interest in endothelial signaling, eg by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) as well as by nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR).

  • Allen Cooper

    Allen Cooper

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have had a long standing interest in the liver's role in cholesterol and lipid metabolism. In the past this was focused on laboratory studies but currently involves human studies as part of my patient care responsibilities. In particular I am interested in the role of NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease) in patients with Hepatitis C aand in post liver transplant patients.

  • Steven M. Corsello

    Steven M. Corsello

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    BioI am a physician scientist and medical oncologist at Stanford University. My laboratory operates at the intersection of functional genomics and chemical biology, with the goal of advancing novel molecular mechanisms of cancer inhibition to clinical use. We aim to 1) leverage phenotypic screening and functional genomics to determine novel anti-cancer mechanisms of small molecules, 2) develop new targeted therapy approaches in gastrointestinal cancer, and 3) build a comprehensive community resource for drug repurposing discovery.

  • Alexandra Cours, MD

    Alexandra Cours, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Cours is a clinician educator in geriatrics. She cares for patients as a primary care physician for older adults and as a geriatric medicine consultant in Stanford Hospital. She completed her Internal Medicine residency at University of California, San Diego and Geriatric Medicine fellowship at Stanford University. She has also received additional training in integrative medicine and health professions education. During her residency and fellowship, she created a podcast about integrative medicine and co-authored a book about managing dementia in the telemedicine environment. She conducts research on bone and muscle health and leads a wellness program for medical trainees. Her interests include optimizing lifestyle medicine in older adults, creating innovative approaches to medical education, and improving physician and trainee wellness.

  • Lawrence Crapo

    Lawrence Crapo

    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology, Gerontology and Metabolism) at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInvestigation of the epidemiology of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at a public hospital. All cases of DKA at SCVMC occurring over the past 5 years have been identified. Of the 480 cases of DKA, about 1/3 are in Type II diabetics, and 2/3 in Type I diabetics. We are exploring the causes of DKA in the two groups.

  • Meredith Craven, PhD, MPH

    Meredith Craven, PhD, MPH

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Craven’s research reflects her background and interests in psychogastroenterology (GI psychology), public health, and positive psychology. She has collaborated on projects across the spectrum of GI disorders, using quantitative and qualitative methods. She is interested in the role of biopsychosocial factors on symptom perception, experience, and related health outcomes and behaviors. In particular, she is passionate about investigating the role of patient strengths that can be fostered clinically, and mind-body practices.

  • Alia Crum

    Alia Crum

    Associate Professor of Psychology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Primary Care & Population Health)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab focuses on how subjective mindsets (e.g., thoughts, beliefs and expectations) can alter objective reality through behavioral, psychological, and physiological mechanisms. We are interested in understanding how mindsets affect important outcomes both within and beyond the realm of medicine, in the domains such as exercise, diet and stress. https://mbl.stanford.edu/

  • Nancy Cuan, MD

    Nancy Cuan, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Nancy Cuan is an internal medicine primary care physician at Stanford Coordinated Care (SCC). SCC is a primary care medicine practice that is a benefit for eligible members of the Stanford University, Stanford Health Care, SLAC and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital community and their covered adult dependents with ongoing health conditions. More information, including a self-assessment to determine eligibility based on health condition(s) and health insurance, can be found at the Stanford Coordinated Care website.

    Prior to joining Stanford Coordinated Care, she had practiced for many years at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center and helped with the resident training program there. She has had experience in working with patients with multiple ongoing medical conditions.

  • Christina Curtis

    Christina Curtis

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology), of Genetics and of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Curtis laboratory for Cancer Computational and Systems Biology is focused on the development and application of innovative experimental, computational, and analytical approaches to improve the diagnosis, treatment, and early detection of cancer.