School of Medicine


Showing 51-100 of 177 Results

  • Jessica Ferguson

    Jessica Ferguson

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Ferguson is a board certified Infectious Disease specialist. She specializes in the treatment of immunocompromised patients, including patients who have undergone bone marrow or solid organ transplantation and patients with hematologic or solid malignancies on chemotherapy.

  • Anne Fernald

    Anne Fernald

    Josephine Knotts Knowles Professor of Human Biology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWorking with English- and Spanish-learning children from diverse socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds, our research examines the importance of early language experience in supporting language development. We are deeply involved in community-based research in San Jose, designing an innovative parent-engagement program for low-resource Latino families with young children. We are also conducting field studies of beliefs about child development and caregiver-child interaction in rural villages in Senegal. A central goal of this translational research is to help parents understand their vital role in facilitating children’s language and cognitive growth.

  • Russell D. Fernald

    Russell D. Fernald

    Benjamin Scott Crocker Professor of Human Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn the course of evolution,two of the strongest selective forces in nature,light and sex, have left their mark on living organisms. I am interested in how the development and function of the nervous system reflects these events. We use the reproductive system to understand how social behavior influences the main system of reproductive action controlled by a collection of cells in the brain containing gonodotropin releasing hormone(GnRH)

  • Marcelo Fernandez Vina

    Marcelo Fernandez Vina

    Professor of Pathology

    BioMarcelo Fernández-Viña, Ph.D., D (ABHI) is a Professor for the Department of Pathology at Stanford University Medical School and serves as Director of the Histocompatibility, Immunogenetics and Disease Profiling Laboratory at this institution. He has been working in the fields of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics since 1982. He earned a degree in Biochemistry from the School of Basic Sciences in Rosario, Argentina, and his Ph.D. in Internal Medicine from the University of Buenos Aires Medical School in Argentina. Previously he held a position as a Professor in the Department of Laboratory Medicine at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. He has more than 180 peer reviewed publications, many of them focusing on HLA variation in multiple world populations, identifying susceptibility and resistance factors for diseases and in the impact of HLA mismatches in allogeneic transplantation; and 59 book chapters. He served as expert Consultant for Donor Searches for NMDP and as President Elect, President and Past President of the American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. He served as a member of the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee for the United Network for Organ Sharing. He served as Co-Chair of the Immunobiology Committee of the CIBMTR; He also served as a member of the HHS Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation (ACBSCT).He serves as HLA Expert Consultant for the NMDP for the HRSA contract and is a member of the Histocompatibility Advisory Group for NMDP. He is Councilor of the International Histocompatibility Workshop and a member of the WHO Nomenclature Committee for Factors of the HLA System and was Chairman of the (17th) International HLA & Immunogenetics Workshop, and Past President of the International HLA & Immunogenetics Workshop.

  • Nielsen Fernandez-Becker

    Nielsen Fernandez-Becker

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioI am the director of the Celiac Disease Program at Stanford and I am highly experienced in diagnosis and management of celiac disease and gluten associated disorders.
    My objective is to provide excellent and compassionate clinical care for my patients while seeking a better understanding of diseases I treat, particularly Celiac disease (CeD), eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). My top priorities are patient care and translational research to make new discoveries and improve the care my patients.

  • Juan Carlos Fernandez-Miranda

    Juan Carlos Fernandez-Miranda

    Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    BioDr. Juan Fernandez-Miranda is Professor of Neurosurgery and Surgical Director of the Stanford Brain Tumor, Skull Base, and Pituitary Centers. He is internationally renowned for his expertise in minimally invasive brain surgery, endoscopic skull base and pituitary surgery, open skull base surgery, and complex brain tumor surgery. He has performed nearly 3,000 cranial operations including over 1,500 endoscopic endonasal operations for pituitary tumors and other skull base lesions. He is highly regarded for his innovative contributions to the development and refinement of endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery, for his ability to select the most effective and less invasive approach to each individual patient, and for his precise knowledge of the intricate anatomy of the white matter tracts required to maximize resection and minimize morbidity on high and low grade glioma patients. He has been recently ranked by Expertscape as World-Expert (top 0.05%) on Skull Base Surgery and #1 Neurosurgeon Expert on Skull Base Tumors (pituitary adenomas, meningiomas, craniopharyngiomas, chordomas, chondrosarcomas, schwannomas and esthesioneuroblastomas) on the US Pacific Region. He is co-founder and vice-president of the International Rhoton Society and executive member of the Board of Directors of the The Neurosurgical Atlas, the largest nonprofit organization for neurosurgical education and research in the world.

    Dr. Fernandez-Miranda completed neurosurgery residency at La Paz University Hospital in Madrid, Spain. Upon completion of his residency, he was awarded the Sanitas Prize to the best medical postgraduate trainee in the country. From 2005 to 2007, he underwent fellowship training in microsurgical neuroanatomy at the University of Florida under legendary neurosurgeon Albert L. Rhoton, Jr. From 2007 to 2010 he continued subspecialty clinical training in cerebrovascular surgery at the University of Virginia, and endoscopic endonasal and open skull base surgery at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC). During his 10-year tenure at UPMC, he pioneered endoscopic endonasal approaches to highly complex pituitary and skull base tumors, developed a world-class complex brain surgery program, and led a premier training and research program on surgical neuroanatomy and skull base surgery.

    In 2018, he was recruited to bring to Stanford his unique technical expertise and to collaborate with world-renowned Stanford colleagues across multiple disciplines, leading the establishment of one of the most preeminent centers worldwide for comprehensive treatment of complex lesions in the brain, skull base, and pituitary regions. His top priority is to provide gentle, accurate, and safe surgery, in a team-based and compassionate approach to patient care.

  • Sebastian Fernandez-Pol

    Sebastian Fernandez-Pol

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pathology

    BioDr. Sebastian Fernandez-Pol is an academic hematopathologist with fellowship training in hematopathology and dermatopathology. He has a particular interest in improving diagnostic accuracy for cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders. Dr. Fernandez-Pol received his B.A. in chemistry with a concentration in biochemistry from the Washington University in St. Louis in 2003, his MD and PhD from Northwestern University in 2013, and completed his anatomic pathology and clinical pathology residency, hematopathology fellowship, and dermatopathology fellowship at Stanford University in 2019.

  • Katherine Ferrara

    Katherine Ferrara

    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy focus is image-guided drug and gene delivery and I am engaged in the design of imaging devices, molecularly-targeted imaging probes and engineered delivery vehicles, drawing upon my education in biology and imaging physics and more than 20 years of experience with the synthesis and labeling of therapeutic particles. My laboratory has unique resources for and substantial experience in synthetic chemistry and ultrasound, CT, MR and PET imaging.

  • James Ferrell

    James Ferrell

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab has two main goals: to understand the regulation of mitosis and to understand the systems-level logic of simple signaling circuits. We often make use of Xenopus laevis oocytes, eggs, and cell-free extracts for both sorts of study. We also carry out single-cell fluorescence imaging studies on mammalian cell lines. Our experimental work is complemented by computational and theoretical studies aimed at understanding the design principles and recurring themes of regulatory circuits.

  • Margaret S. Ferris, MD

    Margaret S. Ferris, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Ferris is a fellowship-trained neurologist and Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology, Division of Movement Disorders.

    She diagnoses and treats a breath of movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and essential tremor. She recognizes the broad effects of these conditions on daily living and aims to develop personalized, comprehensive treatment plans that optimize health and quality of life.

    Dr. Ferris research interests focus on access to interventional therapies for movement disorders. She has participated in investigations sponsored by the National Institutes of to evaluate advanced treatments for complications of Parkinson’s disease.

    She has co-authored articles in publications such as Nature, The Neurohospitalist, and BioMed Central (BMC) Genomics. She has presented her insights about innovations in the understanding, detection, and management of movement disorders at conferences including, the Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, Pan American Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Congress.

    She is a member of the American Academy of Neurology and the Movement Disorder Society.

  • Vikram Fielding-Singh

    Vikram Fielding-Singh

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImproving perioperative care of patients with end stage kidney disease, using biomarkers to aid early diagnosis of acute kidney injury, and evaluating the performance of risk prediction models in perioperative medicine.

  • Andrey Finegersh, MD, PhD

    Andrey Finegersh, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    BioDr. Finegersh is a fellowship-trained head and neck surgical oncologist with board certification in otolaryngology and a clinical assistant professor with the Stanford School of Medicine Department of Otolaryngology.

    He specializes in treatment of benign and malignant tumors of the head and neck and has received additional training in microvascular reconstruction and transoral robotic surgery. He takes tremendous pride in providing compassionate care for patients and managing challenging diagnoses.

    Dr. Finegersh completed his MD and PhD degrees at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine's combined Medical Scientist Training Program. He went on to complete residency in otolaryngology at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) and his fellowship at Stanford University, where he stayed on as faculty.

    He has extensive research experience in head and neck cancer epigenetics and completed post-doctoral research at the University of Pittsburgh and UCSD. He has received grants from the NIH and American Academy of Otolaryngology and has an active research lab studying molecular mechanisms of cancer. Dr. Finegersh has additional clinical interests in studying the role of minimally invasive surgery to improve outcomes for head and neck cancer patients.

  • Anna Finley Caulfield, MD

    Anna Finley Caulfield, MD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Finley joined the Stanford Stroke Center in 2004 from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. She cares for acute stroke patients and other neurologically critical ill patients in the intensive care unit. Currently, her research interests include hypothermia after cardiac arrest and comparing health care provider's predications of future neurological function in neurologically critical ill patients to their 6-month outcome.

  • David Fiorentino, MD, PhD

    David Fiorentino, MD, PhD

    Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in all types of immune-mediated skin disease, with a focus on psoriasis and rheumatic skin disease. I co-direct a multi-disciplinary clinic dedicated to the care of patients with rheumatic skin diseases, such as lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, dermatyositis and scleroderma. I conduct multiple clinical trials and I participate in translational research with tissues obtained from a prospective cohort of patients with scleroderma, lupus, and dermatomyositis.

  • Andrew Fire

    Andrew Fire

    George D. Smith Professor of Molecular and Genetic Medicine and Professor of Pathology and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study natural cellular mechanisms for adapting to genetic change. These include systems activated during normal development and those for detecting and responding to foreign or unwanted genetic activity. Underlying these studies are questions of how a cells can distinguish information as "self" versus "nonself" or "wanted" versus "unwanted".

  • Michael Fischbach

    Michael Fischbach

    Liu (Liao) Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe microbiome carries out extraordinary feats of biology: it produces hundreds of molecules, many of which impact host physiology; modulates immune function potently and specifically; self-organizes biogeographically; and exhibits profound stability in the face of perturbations. Our lab studies the mechanisms of microbiome-host interactions. Our approach is based on two technologies we recently developed: a complex (119-member) defined gut community that serves as an analytically manageable but biologically relevant system for experimentation, and new genetic systems for common species from the microbiome. Using these systems, we investigate mechanisms at the community level and the strain level.

    1) Community-level mechanisms. A typical gut microbiome consists of 200-250 bacterial species that span >6 orders of magnitude in relative abundance. As a system, these bacteria carry out extraordinary feats of metabolite consumption and production, elicit a variety of specific immune cell populations, self-organize geographically and metabolically, and exhibit profound resilience against a wide range of perturbations. Yet remarkably little is known about how the community functions as a system. We are exploring this by asking two broad questions: How do groups of organisms work together to influence immune function? What are the mechanisms that govern metabolism and ecology at the 100+ strain scale? Our goal is to learn rules that will enable us to design communities that solve specific therapeutic problems.

    2) Strain-level mechanisms. Even though gut and skin colonists live in communities, individual strains can have an extraordinary impact on host biology. We focus on two broad (and partially overlapping) categories:

    Immune modulation: Can we redirect colonist-specific T cells against an antigen of interest by expressing it on the surface of a bacterium? How do skin colonists induce high levels of Staphylococcus-specific antibodies in mice and humans?

    Abundant microbiome-derived molecules: By constructing single-strain/single-gene knockouts in a complex defined community, we will ask: What are the effects of bacterially produced molecules on host metabolism and immunology? Can the molecular output of low-abundance organisms impact host physiology?

    3) Cell and gene therapy. We have begun two new efforts in mammalian cell and gene therapies. First, we are developing methods that enable cell-type specific delivery of genome editing payloads in vivo. We are especially interested in delivery vehicles that are customizable and easy to manufacture. Second, we have begun a comprehensive genome mining effort with an emphasis on understudied or entirely novel enzyme systems with utility in mammalian genome editing.

  • Michael Fischbein

    Michael Fischbein

    Thelma and Henry Doelger Professor of Cardiovascular Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular and genetic mechanisms of aortic aneurysm/dissection development. Molecular mechanisms of aneurysm formation in Marfan Syndrome. Clinical research interests include thoracic aortic diseases (aneurysms, dissections).

  • Adina S. Fischer, MD, PhD

    Adina S. Fischer, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology)
    On Leave from 10/10/2022 To 10/09/2024

    BioDr. Fischer’s research focuses on characterizing risk and resilience factors in depression. She has been awarded an NIH Career Development Award (K23) and Klingenstein Foundation Fellowship in Adolescent Depression to build her program of clinical and translational research at Stanford. Dr. Fischer's program of clinical care focused on the delivery and teaching of evidence-based clinical interventions that enhance resilience, with a focus on addressing the unique stressors encountered in academia and academic medicine that may contribute to risk and resilience in mood and anxiety disorders.

    Dr. Fischer’s translational program of research focuses on:
    (1) Improving our understanding of protective biomarkers of resilience to depression
    (2) Characterizing the effects of cannabis on neurobiological function and depressive symptoms
    (3) Developing neurobiologically-guided interventions for depressive disorders, particularly those that co-occur with cannabis and other substance use

    Dr. Fischer earned her BSc at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Brain and Cognitive Sciences, where she conducted research in the Early Childhood Cognition Laboratory. She then completed the MD/PhD Program at Dartmouth, where she obtained her PhD in in Neuroscience. Dr. Fischer’s doctoral research focused on characterizing the acute effects of cannabis in patients with schizophrenia and co-occurring cannabis use disorder. She then completed the Stanford Psychiatry Residency Training Program as a member of the Research Track, and an NIH funded T-32 postdoctoral research fellowship within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

  • Stephen Fischer

    Stephen Fischer

    Associate Professor of Anesthesia at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPreoperative evaluation of the medically complex, patient; cost-effectiveness of preop diagnostic testing; patient, outcome studies in relation to preoperative preparation; computer, database of patient perioperative data; development of the, Anesthesia Preoperative Clinic as a model of quality, efficient, and, cost-effective care.

  • Kevin Fish

    Kevin Fish

    Professor of Anesthesia at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeurological dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass;, metabolism of inhalation anesthetics.

  • Ann Caroline Fisher, MD

    Ann Caroline Fisher, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Ophthalmology

    BioCaroline Fisher, MD, is a Clinical Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at Stanford University Hospital and Clinics. She specializes in cataract and glaucoma surgery, including minimally invasive glaucoma surgery.

    She completed her undergraduate education at Stanford University, obtaining both a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Spanish, with Departmental Honors. She earned her medical degree from Stanford University School of Medicine and then went on to her internship at the University of Pennsylvania Presbyterian Hospital. She completed her ophthalmology residency at NYU/ Manhattan Eye, Ear, Throat Hospital. She then returned to Stanford for her Glaucoma Fellowship.

    Dr. Fisher is Director of the Stanford Belize Vision Clinic, dedicated to promoting eye health and care in Belize, and providing an international rotation for Stanford Ophthalmology Residents. She is also an Office of Faculty Development and Diversity Liaison and is currently one of the Stanford Network for Advancement and Promotion (SNAP) Cohort Leaders. Dr. Fisher is the Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion for the Department of Ophthalmology.

  • George A. Fisher Jr.

    George A. Fisher Jr.

    Colleen Haas Chair in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical expertise in GI cancers with research which emphasizes Phase I and II clinical trials of novel therapies but also includes translational studies including biomarkers, molecular imaging, tumor immunology and development of immunotherapeutic trials.

  • Paul Graham Fisher, MD

    Paul Graham Fisher, MD

    Beirne Family Professor of Pediatric Neuro-Oncology, Professor of Pediatrics and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery and of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical neuro-oncology: My research explores the epidemiology, natural history, and disease patterns of brain tumors and other cancers in childhood, as well as prospective clinical trials for treating these neoplasms. Research interests also include neurologic effects of cancer and its therapies.

  • Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    Robert Fisher, MD, PhD

    The Maslah Saul, MD, Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fisher is interested in clincal, laboratory and translational aspects of epilepsy research. Prior work has included: electrical deep brain stimulation for epilepsy, studied in laboratory models and clinical trials; drug delivery to a seizure focus; mechanisms of absence epilepsy studied with in vitro slices of brain thalamus; hyperthermic seizures; diagnosis and treatment of non-epileptic seizures, the post-ictal state; driving and epilepsy; new antiepileptic drugs; surgery for epilepsy.

  • Matthew Fitzgerald, PhD

    Matthew Fitzgerald, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research encompasses several translational projects. One focus is to modify the routine audiologic test battery such that it places equal weight on hearing acuity and hearing function. This work includes measures of speech in noise, or electrophysiologic responses such as the FFR. I also explore tools to better assess and maximize performance in users of hearing aids and cochlear implants. Finally, I am also investigating the benefits of telemedicine, and new treatments for tinnitus.

  • Peter Fitzgerald, MD, PhD

    Peter Fitzgerald, MD, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Cardiovascular), Emeritus

    BioDr. Peter Fitzgerald is the Director of the Center for Cardiovascular Technology and Director of the Cardiovascular Core Analysis Laboratory (CCAL) at Stanford University Medical School. He is an Interventional Cardiologist and has a PhD in Engineering. He is Professor in both the Departments of Medicine and Engineering (by courtesy) at Stanford. Presently, Dr. Fitzgerald’s laboratory includes 17 postdoctoral fellows and graduate engineering students focusing on state-of-the-art technologies in Cardiovascular Medicine. He has led or participated in over 175 clinical trials, published over 550 manuscripts/chapters, and lectures worldwide. He has trained over 150 post-docs in Engineering and Medicine in the past decade. In addition, he heads the Stanford/Asia MedTech innovation program.
    Dr. Fitzgerald has been principle/founder of twenty-one medical device companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has transitioned fourteen of these start-ups to large medical device companies. He serves on several boards of directors, advised dozens of medical device startups as well as multinational healthcare companies in the design and development of new diagnostic and therapeutic devices in the cardiovascular arena. In 2001, Peter was on the founding team of LVP Capital, a venture firm, focused on medical device and biotechnology start-ups in San Francisco. In 2009, he co-founded TriVentures, which is an incubator/venture fund for early stage medical technology in Israel.

  • Caroline Fleck

    Caroline Fleck

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Caroline Fleck received her doctorate in Psychology & Neuroscience from Duke University, and went on to specialize in cognitive behavioral therapies including Exposure and Response Prevention, Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Parent Management Training, Gottman Method Couples Therapy, and Behavioral Activation. She is the founder and clinical director of Luma - a network of evidence-based clinicians in private practice. Dr. Fleck is also a trainer, educator, and public speaker on the topics of evidence-based approaches in psychology, mindfulness, and the use of technology in mental health care. Her lectures and courses at Stanford focus on training residents, post-docs, and faculty in Dialectical Behavior Therapy, and risk management.

    More information can be found on her website: https://www.drcarolinefleck.com/

  • Dominik Fleischmann

    Dominik Fleischmann

    Professor of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNon-invasive Cardiovascular Imaging
    Image Post-processing
    Contrast Medium Dynamics

  • Barry Fleisher

    Barry Fleisher

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeonatology, neurobehavioral development, outcomes in premature infants.