School of Medicine


Showing 101-150 of 176 Results

  • Pamela Flood

    Pamela Flood

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Flood is a Professor at Stanford University who is fellowship trained in Pain Medicine and Obstetric Anesthesiology. She specializes in the treatment of chronic pelvic pain and multiple aspects of women's health including the prevention of chronic pain after childbirth. Research interests include the role of multimodal treatment in chronic pain conditions and prevention of persistent opioid use. Her research has spanned from detailed pharmacodynamic analysis, clinical trials to population health.

  • Aubrey L. Florom-Smith, PhD, RN, AFAsMA

    Aubrey L. Florom-Smith, PhD, RN, AFAsMA

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioAubrey Florom-Smith, PhD, RN, AFAsMA, is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health, at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She is a Nurse Scientist and Manager of Patient Care Research in the Office of Research, Patient Care Services at Stanford Health Care, where she supports nursing and interprofessional research. Dr. Florom-Smith has over 10 years of nursing, clinical, and applied research experience, across a wide range of areas of inquiry, and in healthcare, corporate, and laboratory settings. She obtained her Bachelor of Science in Nursing and her PhD in Nursing Science from the University of Miami, where she was the first National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research Predoctoral Fellow at the School of Nursing and Health Studies. Dr. Florom-Smith’s research interests include understanding, sustaining and enhancing human health and performance during spaceflight, adapting impactful countermeasures and interventions for use at the terrestrial bedside and in space, and advancing space nursing as a nursing specialization. Inducted into Sigma Theta Tau in 2008, Dr. Florom-Smith has received several honors and awards, including the 2020 University of Miami Alumnus of Distinction Award, the Aerospace Nursing and Allied Health Professionals Society Louise Marshall Nursing Scholarship, the Jonas Foundation Nurse Leader Scholar, the Sigma Theta Rising Star of Scholarship and Research Award, and the March of Dimes Rising Star Award. Dr. Florom-Smith is an Associate Fellow of the Aerospace Medical Association.

  • Ann Folkins

    Ann Folkins

    Associate Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Folkins' interest is in gynecologic and obstetric pathology, specifically in ovarian and endometrial malignancies and placental clinical-pathologic disorders.

  • Shawna Follis

    Shawna Follis

    Instructor, Medicine - Stanford Prevention Research Center

    BioShawna Follis, PhD, MS, is an Instructor of Medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center. Previously, she was a Stanford Propel Postdoctoral Scholar from 2021 to 2023 and a NIH T32 Postdoctoral Fellow from 2020 to 2021. Dr. Follis is a social epidemiologist researching race and ethnicity health disparities, aging, and cardiovascular disease prevention. She received her PhD in epidemiology at the University of Arizona and her master’s degree in anthropology from Purdue University. Dr. Follis promotes inclusion of underrepresented communities in scientific research through mentorship, teaching, and diversity committees.

  • Sai Folmsbee, MD, PhD

    Sai Folmsbee, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research interest is the intersection of psychiatry and neuroimmunology. I am currently collaborating with Stanford Neuroimmunology in a retrospective analysis of patient data to determine the relationship between psychaitric medications and clinical outcomes in hospitalized patients with mutliple sclerosis, autoimmune encephalitis, and neuromyelitis optica.

  • Eric Foote

    Eric Foote

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    BioEric Foote is a pediatric hospitalist with experience conducting clinical and public health research around the world. His research focuses on identifying and intervening on health disparities in low income countries and in low resource settings. Currently, he is developing and evaluating a community health worker-led household phototherapy intervention to extend access to neonatal jaundice care for newborns in rural Bangladesh. He is also working to improve SARS-CoV-2 testing and genomic surveillance across California and worldwide.

  • James Ford

    James Ford

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMammalian DNA repair and DNA damage inducible responses; p53 tumor suppressor gene; transcription in nucleotide excision repair and mutagenesis; genetic determinants of cancer cell sensitivity to DNA damage; genetics of inherited cancer susceptibility syndromes and human GI malignancies; clinical cancer genetics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancer and mismatch repair deficient colon cancer.

  • Judith Ford

    Judith Ford

    Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are using functional brain imaging methods (electrophysiology and magnetic resonance imaging) to study symptoms of schizophrenia such as auditory hallucinations, self-monitoring failures, emotional blunting, and cognitive deficits.

  • Polly Fordyce

    Polly Fordyce

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering and of Genetics
    On Leave from 01/01/2014 To 08/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Fordyce Lab is focused on developing new instrumentation and assays for making quantitative, systems-scale biophysical measurements of molecular interactions. Current research in the lab is focused on three main platforms: (1) arrays of valved reaction chambers for high-throughput protein expression and characterization, (2) spectrally encoded beads for multiplexed bioassays, and (3) sortable droplets and microwells for single-cell assays.

  • Joseph (Joe) D Forrester MD MSc FAWM FACS

    Joseph (Joe) D Forrester MD MSc FAWM FACS

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am broadly interested in research exploring the care of the injured patient both in high- and low-resource settings. I have specific on-going projects assessing surgical site infection surveillance in low-resource settings, and surgical management of acute and chronic non-union rib fractures.

  • Stephen P. Fortmann, MD

    Stephen P. Fortmann, MD

    C.F. Rehnborg Professor in Disease Prevention, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fortmann's interests include population-level (community) prevention of cardiovascular disease, the epidemiology and prevention of chronic diseases, and the effects of the built environment on health. He has conducted research projects addressing tobacco use cessation, tobacco control policy, the role of retail marketing on youth tobacco use, nutrition education, blood pressure control, and lipid disorders.

  • Steven Foung

    Steven Foung

    Professor of Pathology
    On Partial Leave from 03/18/2024 To 02/22/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focus is define correlates of protection against hepatitis C virus and other viral pathogens. Detailed characterization of broadly neutralizing human or nonhuman primate monoclonal antibodies against these agents will create high-resolution, functional maps of linear and nonlinear epitopes comprising the major binding sites of both isolate-specific and broadly neutralizing antibodies for rational vaccine design.

  • Virginia Fowkes

    Virginia Fowkes

    Senior Lecturer in Medicine (Family and Community Medicine)
    Sr. Research Scholar, Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEvaluation of academic-community programs for health professionals in medically underserved areas
    Training of health professionals for medically underserved areas/populations
    Program development in medical education (Family Medicine and (AHECs)
    National and state policy workforce development

  • Michael B. Fowler, MBBS, FRCP

    Michael B. Fowler, MBBS, FRCP

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAdrenergic nervous system; beta-adrenergic function in, heart failure; drugs in heart failure.

  • Andrea Fox

    Andrea Fox

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioAndrea is a certified Physician Assistant who joined Stanford Health Care in 2019 to develop a comprehensive Fracture Liaison Service and bone health clinic championed by Dr. Michael Gardner, Trauma Orthopaedist. Andrea earned a Masters degree in Medical Science, Physician Assistant Studies and a Masters in Health Administration, both from the University of Missouri. She holds a current certification with the International Society of Clinical Densitometry and has completed her certificate trained as a fracture liaison clinician through the National Osteoporosis Foundation. She has a keen interest in educating primary care providers and the general public on the importance of early monitoring, risk factors and treatment for bone loss and the prevention and healing of fractures.

  • Paige Fox, MD, PhD, FACS

    Paige Fox, MD, PhD, FACS

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery)

    BioDr. Paige Fox is Board Certified Plastic Surgeon who specializes in hand surgery, reconstructive microsurgery including facial reanimation, as well as peripheral nerve and brachial plexus surgery. She is an Associate Professor in the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive surgery in the Department of Surgery. She works with adult and pediatric patients. Her lab focuses on wound healing and nerve compression. She has clinical research interested in optimizing care of upper extremity and nerve disorders both in the US and internationally. Dr. Fox has a passion for sustainability and health care's effect on the environment. She is involved in efforts to green the OR and the clinics at Stanford.

  • Katie Fracalanza

    Katie Fracalanza

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fracalanza is interested in factors underlying the development and maintenance of mood and anxiety disorders. She has conducted research on cognitive factors thought to maintain anxiety, such as intolerance of uncertainty and perfectionism. She is interested in the patient perspective, and conducting research from a qualitative lens to better understand this.

  • Benjamin Lewis Franc

    Benjamin Lewis Franc

    Clinical Professor, Radiology - Rad/Nuclear Medicine

    BioDr. Franc is a Clinical Professor of Radiology - Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. He completed his B.S and M.S. in Chemical Engineering at Stanford University, Stanford, CA. He completed his medical school training at University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine. While conducting his residency at Stanford University, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, he was also the chief resident. Dr. Franc’s research interests include all aspects of PET-CT as he has nearly 20 years of experience in clinical Nuclear Medicine with particular expertise in PET-CT.

    Dr. Franc predominantly publishes and lectures on applications and innovations of PET-CT. He has proficiency in all aspects of PET radiopharmaceutical development, spanning the design of molecules, synthesis of radioligands, and use in animal and human imaging. He also has expertise in quantitative image analysis, development of novel post-processing image reconstruction methods, and the application of artificial intelligence in human diagnostics. Dr. Franc has implemented new radiopharmaceuticals in pre-clinical and clinical research PET imaging as well as for clinical PET with applications in cancer, infectious disease (HIV), and autoimmune disease (RA). He has applied advanced computational techniques, including deep learning, to extract predictive data for prognosis of various cancers and neurodegenerative diseases from molecular imaging modalities.

    Since joining the faculty at Stanford in 2018, Dr. Franc has received several awards including the Radiological Society of North America 2019 Margulis Award for Excellence in Research; RSNA 2019 Trainee Research; and Most read article in Radiology 2019. He has accepted the position of Director, Residency Program, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging as well as the Director, Radiology Value-Based Care Initiative. Dr. Franc has presented more than 40 abstracts at national and international meetings and published more than 90 papers in peer-reviewed publications, as well as 9 book chapters.

  • Uta Francke

    Uta Francke

    Professor of Genetics and of Pediatrics, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunctional consequences and pathogenetic mechanisms of mutations and microdeletions in human neurogenetic syndromes and mouse models. Integration of genomic information into medical care.

  • Curtis Frank

    Curtis Frank

    W. M. Keck, Sr. Professor in Engineering, Emeritus

    BioThe properties of ultrathin polymer films are often different from their bulk counterparts. We use spin casting, Langmuir-Blodgett deposition, and surface grafting to fabricate ultrathin films in the range of 100 to 1000 Angstroms thick. Macromolecular amphiphiles are examined at the air-water interface by surface pressure, Brewster angle microscopy, and interfacial shear measurements and on solid substrates by atomic force microscopy, FTIR, and ellipsometry. A vapor-deposition-polymerization process has been developed for covalent grafting of poly(amino acids) from solid substrates. FTIR measurements permit study of secondary structures (right and left-handed alpha helices, parallel and anti-parallel beta sheets) as a function of temperature and environment.

    A broadly interdisciplinary collaboration has been established with the Department of Ophthalmology in the Stanford School of Medicine. We have designed and synthesized a fully interpenetrating network of two different hydrogel materials that have properties consistent with application as a substitute for the human cornea: high water swellability up to 85%,tensile strength comparable to the cornea, high glucose permeability comparable to the cornea, and sufficient tear strength to permit suturing. We have developed a technique for surface modification with adhesion peptides that allows binding of collagen and subsequent growth of epithelial cells. Broad questions on the relationships among molecular structure, processing protocol, and biomedical device application are being pursued.

  • Matthew Frank

    Matthew Frank

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Matthew Frank, MD, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy at Stanford University. Dr. Frank predominantly cares for patients with high-risk lymphoma and other blood cancers. He is a lead investigator of clinical trials evaluating the safety and effectiveness of cancer treatments called chimeric antigen receptor (CAR ) T therapy for patients with lymphomas and leukemias. Dr. Frank’s research focuses on developing methods to identify patients who are at high risk for relapse or developing side-effects after receiving CAR T therapy and to understand why these relapses and side-effects occur.

  • Michael Frank

    Michael Frank

    Benjamin Scott Crocker Professor of Human Biology and Professor, by courtesy, of Linguistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow do we learn to communicate using language? I study children's language learning and how it interacts with their developing understanding of the social world. I use behavioral experiments, computational tools, and novel measurement methods like large-scale web-based studies, eye-tracking, and head-mounted cameras.

  • Lorry Frankel

    Lorry Frankel

    Professor of Pediatrics (Critical Care) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) Collaborative efforts with Dale Umetsu and Dave Lewis in evaluating alveolar macrophage response to antigen. We try to examine cytokine activation and inhibition. I perform bronchoalveolar lavage in these patients in order to obtain alveolar macrophages which we culture, stimulate and study.
    2) Evaluate outcomes for patients admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit from the EMS services for trauma and other life-threatening events.

  • Jennifer Frankovich

    Jennifer Frankovich

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Rheumatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary interest and role at Stanford is to evaluate and treat children with both systemic and organ specific autoimmune disease. In October of 2012, we started a multidisciplinary clinic dedicated to treating patients with PANS (Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndromes). I am currently the clinical and research director for the PANS program.

  • Hunter Fraser

    Hunter Fraser

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the evolution of complex traits by developing new experimental and computational methods.

    Our work brings together quantitative genetics, genomics, epigenetics, and evolutionary biology to achieve a deeper understanding of how genetic variation shapes the phenotypic diversity of life. Our main focus is on the evolution of gene expression, which is the primary fuel for natural selection. Our long-term goal is to be able to introduce complex traits into new species via genome editing.

  • Susan M. Frayne, MD, MPH

    Susan M. Frayne, MD, MPH

    Professor of Medicine (General Medical Discipline)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary care for mentally ill patients, particularly post-traumatic stress disorder in women seconday to sexual trauma.

  • Michael Fredericson, MD

    Michael Fredericson, MD

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the etiology, prevention, and treatment of overuse sports injuries in athletes and lifestyle medicine practices for improved health and longevity.

  • Michael T. Freehill, MD, FAOA

    Michael T. Freehill, MD, FAOA

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

    BioDr. Freehill is a board-certified, double fellowship-trained specialist in orthopaedic surgery with a sub-specialty certification in sports medicine. His concentration is in shoulder and elbow. Dr. Freehill is a team physician for the Stanford University athletics program and head physician for the Stanford University baseball team. Dr. Freehill also teaches in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Freehill’s practice focuses on all shoulder conditions. He treats rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, shoulder arthritis, sports shoulder, arthropathy, complex shoulder pathology, and sports related shoulder injury. In addition, he is also passionate about sports- related elbow injuries, with an emphasis on thrower’s elbow.

    Professional and amateur athletes, as well as non-athletes, come to Dr. Freehill for expert care. His sports medicine training and specialization in shoulder replacement procedures enable him to treat patients across the lifespan. Depending on factors including the patient’s condition and occupation, he may recommend treatment ranging from non-operative solutions (such as physical therapy) to cutting-edge biologics procedures or complex surgery.

    In addition to his positions within the Stanford University athletics program, Dr. Freehill serves as assistant team physician for the Oakland A’s. Previously, he was a team physician for the Detroit Tigers and the Winston-Salem Dash (affiliated with the Chicago White Sox); he assisted with the Baltimore Orioles. He has also served as Director of Sports Medicine for Wake Forest University Athletics.

    As executive director of the Stanford Baseball Science CORE, Dr. Freehill draws on his previous experience as a professional baseball player to help athletes of all skill levels. In the lab, he conducts cutting edge research on the biomechanics of overhead throwers in order to support advances in throwing performance. He has conducted a study on pitch counts in adolescent players funded by Major League Baseball. Dr. Freehill was also awarded a research grant from the National Institutes of Health to investigate stromal vascular fractionated mesenchymal cells and their potential for healing rotator cuff tendon tears.

    Dr. Freehill has pioneered the use of some of the latest techniques and technology for leading-edge care. Among the advanced technologies he utilizes is a virtual reality (VR) system that enables him to perform a simulated shoulder arthroplasty procedure prior to entering the operating room with a patient. The system also enables him to predict and order customized implants if needed, which is believed to enable a more positive outcome for patients.

    Peer-reviewed articles authored by Dr. Freehill explore rotator cuff injuries, shoulder arthroplasty, baseball-related injuries and performance interests, and more. His work has been featured in the American Journal of Sports Medicine, the Orthopedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, Arthroscopy, and elsewhere. He has written numerous book chapters and made over 200 presentations at conferences around the world.
    Dr. Freehill’s honors include an Orthopaedic Residency Research Award while at Johns Hopkins University. He is also a Neer Award winner, denoting the highest research award selected annually by the American Shoulder and Elbow Society.

    Currently, he serves on the Medical Publishing Board of Trustees for the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. He is a member of the American Orthopaedic Association, and the Major League Baseball Team Physician Association. He is a committee member for the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Society, International Congress of Arthroscopy and Sports Traumatology, the Arthroscopy Association of North America, and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  • Heather Freeman

    Heather Freeman

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioHeather Freeman, PsyD, RYT 500, received her PsyD in Clinical Psychology from Pacific University in 2019. She obtained her 200-hour yoga teaching certification at the Asheville Yoga Center in Asheville, NC in 2014, and her 300-hour yoga teaching certification at the DAYA Foundation in Portland, OR. She previously earned a Master's in Counseling Psychology from Loyola University in Baltimore, MD and is currently working towards becoming a licensed psychologist.

    Dr. Freeman continues to align her professional interest in psychology with the ancient wisdom and teachings of yoga. She considers herself a gestalt therapist, and views each person as inherently adaptable, resilient and existing within a variety of intertwined contexts. She combines yoga psychology with Gestalt therapy to create a holistic view of the person that draws on and connects mind, body, and spirit. Yoga, like Gestalt, encourages experiential learning in the here-and-now moment to develop and strengthen awareness and innate resources. Her clinical work has involved working with children in a psychiatry hospital, adolescents and college aged students in college counseling centers, as well as working within primary care and community mental health clinics. She has taught yoga to many different populations including graduate students, adults and children receiving mental health services, older adults with chronic health diagnoses, adults in custody and police officers.

    Dr. Freeman’s research has specifically targeted identifying the perception of yoga and illuminating the diverse use of yoga philosophy as an entire system. Her dissertation is a program evaluation on the effects of a yoga teacher training program in a prison, evaluating the effects of training adults in custody to build a personal yoga practice and how to teach yoga to other adults in custody. She is passionate about expanding yoga's accessibility through program development, research and clinical work.