School of Medicine


Showing 1-42 of 42 Results

  • Anusha Kalbasi, M.D.

    Anusha Kalbasi, M.D.

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy)

    BioDr. Kalbasi is a board-certified radiation oncologist and physician-scientist at the Stanford Cancer Institute. He is also an associate professor of radiation oncology at Stanford Medicine and a project member of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    In the clinic, Dr. Kalbasi specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors, especially sarcoma and melanoma, with a focus on bringing new treatments to patients. This focus includes using advanced techniques in radiation oncology and cancer immunotherapy.

    Dr. Kalbasi's NIH-funded laboratory studies the cancer-immune interface in various therapeutic contexts, including T cell therapy, cytokine therapy and innate immune agonism. The lab has described tumor cell-, T cell- and myeloid cell-intrinsic mechanisms of resistance to therapy and approaches to overcome therapy resistance. Dr. Kalbasi is also an experienced leader of clinical trials related to immunotherapy, T cell therapy and radiation therapy.

    Prior to his arrival at Stanford Health Care, Dr. Kalbasi was assistant professor of radiation oncology in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and chief of sarcoma radiotherapy at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. During his tenure, he was named a NextGen Star by the American Association of Cancer Research in recognition for excellence in cancer research.

    Dr. Kalbasi’s work has been published in leading journals including Nature, Science Translational Medicine, JAMA Oncology, Lancet Oncology, Nature Cancer and Cancer Discovery. He has served as a peer reviewer for multiple prestigious journals, including the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Cell and the Journal of Clinical Investigation. He has also presented research to his peers at the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  • Aya Kamaya, MD

    Aya Kamaya, MD

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHepatobiliary imaging
    Hepatocellular carcinoma
    Urologic imaging
    Gynecologic imaging
    Thyroid imaging
    Novel ultrasound technologies
    Perfusion CT imaging of abdominal tumors

  • Michael J. Kaplan, MD

    Michael J. Kaplan, MD

    Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) New therapeutic approaches for head and neck cancer, including immune stimulation possibilities (IRX-2 protocol), integration of biological modifiers, and, eventually, genetic approaches.
    2) Head and neck cancer stem cells: identification, characterization, control--in conjunction with the Irv Weissman and Michael Clarke labs in the Stem Cell Institute
    3) Development of innovative surgical methods at the anterior cranial base

  • Daniel Kapp

    Daniel Kapp

    Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGynecologic malignancies; Rectal/and cancer; Breast Cancer; Hodgkin's disease; Hyperthermia; intraoperative radiation therapy; High dose rate radiation therapy; Predictive assays; Patterns of tumor spread; Health care finance.

  • Amer Karam

    Amer Karam

    Clinical Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Gynecologic Oncology

    BioDr. Amer Karam is a board-certified, fellowship-trained gynecologic surgeon and clinical professor in the Stanford Medicine Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Division of Gynecology Oncology. He specializes in gynecologic oncology, hospice and palliative care, hereditary gynecologic cancers, laparoscopic and robotic gynecologic surgery, and obstetrics and gynecology.

    Dr. Karam attended medical school at the American University in Beirut. He completed his internship and residency at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, before completing a fellowship in gynecologic oncology at the University of California Los Angeles and a fellowship in breast surgery at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Karam has a vested interest in minimally invasive and robotic surgery with a practice centered on this approach for the treatment of patients with gynecologic malignancy and complicated pelvic surgery. He is currently director of Robotic Surgery and Outreach in the Division of Gynecologic Oncology.

  • Maya M. Kasowski

    Maya M. Kasowski

    Assistant Professor of Pathology, of Medicine (Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Genetics

    BioI am a clinical pathologist and assistant professor in the Departments of Medicine, Pathology, and Genetics (by courtesy) at Stanford. I completed my MD-PhD training at Yale University and my residency training and a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Genetics at Stanford University. My experiences as a clinical pathologist and genome scientist have made me passionate about applying cutting-edge technologies to primary patient specimens in order to characterize disease pathologies at the molecular level. The core focus of my lab is to study the mechanisms by which genetic variants influence the risk of disease through effects on intermediate molecular phenotypes.

  • Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Laurence Katznelson, MD

    Professor of Neurosurgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Katznelson is an internationally known neuroendocrinologist and clinical researcher, with research expertise in the diagnosis and management of hypopituitarism, the effects of hormones on neurocognitive function, and the development of therapeutics for acromegaly and Cushing’s syndrome, and neuroendocrine tumors. Dr. Katznelson is the medical director of the multidisciplinary Stanford Pituitary Center, a program geared for patient management, clinical research and patient education

  • Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Mark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D.

    Dennis Farrey Family Professor of Pediatrics, and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMark A. Kay, M.D., Ph.D. Director of the Program in Human Gene Therapy and Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Genetics. Respected worldwide for his work in gene therapy for hemophilia, Dr. Kay and his laboratory focus on establishing the scientific principles and developing the technologies needed for achieving persistent and therapeutic levels of gene expression in vivo. The major disease models are hemophilia, hepatitis C, and hepatitis B viral infections.

  • Electron Kebebew, MD, FACS

    Electron Kebebew, MD, FACS

    Harry A. Oberhelman, Jr. and Mark L. Welton Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Kebebew’s translational and clinical investigations have three main scientific goals: 1) to develop effective therapies for fatal, rare and neglected endocrine cancers, 2) to identify new methods, strategies and technologies for improving the diagnosis and treatment of endocrine neoplasms and the prognostication of endocrine cancers, and 3) to develop methods for precision treatment of endocrine tumors.

  • Ali Raza Khaki, MD

    Ali Raza Khaki, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Khaki is a medical oncologist and clinical assistant professor at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    In his clinical practice, he treats patients with all forms of genitourinary cancer, including kidney, bladder, prostate, and testicular. He also regularly attends on the inpatient oncology service at Stanford Hospital.
    With each patient, he is devoted to providing exceptional, humanistic care and has been recognized throughout his career for his humanism. As a medical student, he was named to the national Gold Humanism Honor Society and he received the Reza Gandjei Humanism Award as a medical resident at UCSF.

    His research interests include novel therapies for genitourinary cancers, with a focus on urothelial cancer outcomes. He also has studied health care utilization and costs for end-of-life care of cancer patients.

    Dr. Khaki has earned honors and recognition from the American Association for Cancer Research, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, Conquer Cancer Foundation, and other organizations.

    He has authored numerous articles on topics such as immunotherapy for urothelial cancer, management of cancer patients with COVID-19, and utilization of end-of-life care by cancer patients. In addition, he is an editor for HemOnc.org and theMednet, a physician-only online community where members share clinical questions and answers.

  • Aziz Khan

    Aziz Khan

    Research Engineer, Stanford Cancer Institute Core

    BioAziz Khan is a sr. staff scientist at the Stanford Cancer Institute, where he develops reproducible pipelines and machine learning methods for integrative analysis of multi-omics data at bulk and single-cell resolution to understand tumor evolution and chromatin regulatory dynamics of tumor growth.

    Aziz completed his PhD in Bioinformatics at Tsinghua University, China in 2016 followed by a three year postdoctoral training at the University of Oslo, Norway. During PhD and Postdoc his primary research emphasis was on regulatory genomics and epigenomics. He developed computational methods, tools, and resources to understand the (epi)genomic control of gene regulation in development and disease.

    Apart from research, he is advocating for open science, open-source, preprints, and reproducibility in research. He is a contributor for Bioconda and also developed several open-source tools and resources such as JASPAR. He is ASAPbio and eLife Community Ambassador and co-founded ECRcentral (ecrcentral.org), a community initiative for early-career researchers.

  • Saad A. Khan, MD

    Saad A. Khan, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    BioDr. Khan is a fellowship-trained cancer specialist with board certification in oncology and hematology. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology.

    Dr. Khan focuses on the treatment of head and neck cancers, advanced thyroid cancers, and neuroendocrine tumors. He recognizes the broad effects of these conditions on daily living and aims to develop personalized, comprehensive treatment plans that optimize health and quality of life.

    Dr. Khan’s research interests include therapeutic clinical trials as well as ways to reduce toxicities that some patients may experience when receiving cancer treatment. His research activities include ongoing clinical trials of targeted and immune therapy for aggressive thyroid cancer.

    He has published numerous articles on his research discoveries in peer-reviewed journals such as the JAMA Oncology, Investigational New Drugs, and others. Topics include new drug treatments for small cell lung cancer and for cancers of the head and neck, racial and gender disparities in certain types of cancer, and management of the potentially toxic effects of cancer therapies.

    Dr. Khan is a member of the NRG Head and Neck Committee. NRG brings together internationally recognized groups (the first words in their names form the acronym “NRG”) to conduct cancer clinical research and share study results. The objective is to inform clinical decision making and healthcare policy worldwide.

    Dr. Khan is a member of the ECOG Head and Neck Core and Thoracic Committees. ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group) is part of one of the five groups of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) Program.

    He also is a member of the National Cancer Institute’s Central IRB for Early Phase Clinical Trials.

    When not providing patient care or conducting research, Dr. Khan enjoys spending time with his family, hiking, and relaxing at the beach.

  • Paul A. Khavari, MD, PhD

    Paul A. Khavari, MD, PhD

    Carl J. Herzog Professor of Dermatology in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe work in epithelial tissue as a model system to study stem cell biology, cancer and new molecular therapeutics. Epithelia cover external and internal body surfaces and undergo constant self-renewal while responding to diverse environmental stimuli. Epithelial homeostasis precisely balances stem cell-sustained proliferation and differentiation-associated cell death, a balance which is lost in many human diseases, including cancer, 90% of which arise in epithelial tissues.

  • Chaitan Khosla

    Chaitan Khosla

    Wells H. Rauser and Harold M. Petiprin Professor and Professor of Chemistry and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in this laboratory focuses on problems where deep insights into enzymology and metabolism can be harnessed to improve human health.

    For the past two decades, we have studied and engineered enzymatic assembly lines called polyketide synthases that catalyze the biosynthesis of structurally complex and medicinally fascinating antibiotics in bacteria. An example of such an assembly line is found in the erythromycin biosynthetic pathway. Our current focus is on understanding the structure and mechanism of this polyketide synthase. At the same time, we are developing methods to decode the vast and growing number of orphan polyketide assembly lines in the sequence databases.

    For more than a decade, we have also investigated the pathogenesis of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, with the goal of discovering therapies and related management tools for this widespread but overlooked disease. Ongoing efforts focus on understanding the pivotal role of transglutaminase 2 in triggering the inflammatory response to dietary gluten in the celiac intestine.

  • Butrus Khuri-Yakub

    Butrus Khuri-Yakub

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioButrus (Pierre) T. Khuri-Yakub is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received the BS degree from the American University of Beirut, the MS degree from Dartmouth College, and the Ph.D. degree from Stanford University, all in electrical engineering. His current research interests include medical ultrasound imaging and therapy, ultrasound neuro-stimulation, chemical/biological sensors, gas flow and energy flow sensing, micromachined ultrasonic transducers, and ultrasonic fluid ejectors. He has authored over 600 publications and has been principal inventor or co-inventor of 107 US and international issued patents. He was awarded the Medal of the City of Bordeaux in 1983 for his contributions to Nondestructive Evaluation, the Distinguished Advisor Award of the School of Engineering at Stanford University in 1987, the Distinguished Lecturer Award of the IEEE UFFC society in 1999, a Stanford University Outstanding Inventor Award in 2004, Distinguished Alumnus Award of the School of Engineering of the American University of Beirut in 2005, Stanford Biodesign Certificate of Appreciation for commitment to educate, mentor and inspire Biodesgin Fellows, 2011, and 2011 recipient of IEEE Rayleigh award.

  • Michaela Kiernan

    Michaela Kiernan

    Sr Research Scholar, Medicine - Med/Stanford Prevention Research Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include: (1) the design and testing of targeted behavioral interventions that promote long-term lifestyle changes and weight management among subgroups at risk, and (2) the development of methodological and statistical approaches that improve the design, delivery, and analysis of behavioral randomized clinical trials

  • Seung K. Kim  M.D., Ph.D.

    Seung K. Kim M.D., Ph.D.

    KM Mulberry Professor, Professor of Developmental Biology, of Medicine (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the development of pancreatic islet cells using molecular, embryologic and genetic methods in several model systems, including mice, pigs, human pancreas, embryonic stem cells, and Drosophila. Our work suggests that critical factors required for islet development are also needed to maintain essential functions of the mature islet. These approaches have informed efforts to generate replacement islets from renewable sources for diabetes.

  • Youn H Kim, MD

    Youn H Kim, MD

    The Joanne and Peter Haas, Jr., Professor for Cutaneous Lymphoma Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical research in cutaneous lymphomas, especially, mycosis fungoides; studies of prognostic factors, long-term survival results, and effects of therapies. Collaborative research with Departments of Pathology and Oncology in basic mechanisms of cutaneous lymphomas. Clinical trials of new investigative therapies for various dermatologic conditions or clinical trials of known therapies for new indications.

  • Abby C. King

    Abby C. King

    David and Susan Heckerman Professor and Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health and of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests include applications of behavioral theory and social ecological approaches to achieve large scale changes impacting chronic disease prevention and control; expanding the reach and translation of evidence-based interventions through state-of-the-art technologies; exploring social and physical environmental influences on health; applying community participatory research perspectives to address health disparities; and policy-level approaches to health promotion/disease prevention.

  • Amanda Kirane, MD, PhD-c, FACS, FSSO

    Amanda Kirane, MD, PhD-c, FACS, FSSO

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (General Surgery)

    BioDr. Kirane is a fellowship-trained, board-certified specialist in complex general surgical oncology. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery, Section of Surgical Oncology, at Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Kirane serves as Director of Cutaneous Surgical Oncology at the Stanford Cancer Center and her clinical practice focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of melanoma and other skin cancers. She partners closely with patients and families to provide the most effective treatment approach possible. For each patient, she tailors an evidence-based, personalized care plan that is innovative, comprehensive, and compassionate.

    Dr. Kirane is Principal Investigator of multiple studies in melanoma and mechanisms of resistance to immunotherapy, with focus on myeloid biology. Her current interests include immune response and novel therapies in melanoma, predictive modeling of patient responses using organoid technology, and translational biomarker development. She has led research into immune therapy for earlier stage melanoma using regionally directed therapy to augment immune response in melanoma and trials in surgical care in melanoma.

    The National Institutes of Health, American Society of Clinical Oncology, the Melanoma Research Alliance, and others have funded her research. She has co-authored articles on her discoveries in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Nature Communications, Nature Genetics, Cancer Research, Journal of Surgical Oncology, Annals of Surgery, Annals of Surgical Oncology, and elsewhere. Topics include intratumoral therapy, biomarker development, macrophage biology in melanoma and immunotheraputic resistance, and patient-derived organoid modeling. Dr. Kirane has presented updates on the management of melanoma and other cancers to her peers at meetings of the American College of Surgeons, Society of Surgical Oncology, and Society for Immunotherapy in Cancer.

    Dr. Kirane has earned awards for her achievements in clinical care, research, and scholarship. The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, Society of Surgical Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and other prestigious organizations have honored her work. She is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons (FACS) and Society of Surgical Oncology (FSSO). She is a member of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, American Association of Cancer Research, Society for Melanoma Research, Connective Tissue Oncology Society, Association of Academic Surgeons, and Association of Women Surgeons.

    She volunteers her time and expertise on behalf of the Melanoma Research Foundation, members of her community in need, STEM programs for girls, and other initiatives. She also is fellowship trained in Physician Wellness and Wellbeing and teaches somatic technique, mindfulness-based stress reduction, meditation, and breathwork.

  • Susan Knox

    Susan Knox

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur interests include 1) study of the effect of radiation on regulatory cell subpopulations and co-stimulatory molecules, 2) use of radiation as an immune modulator for optimization of transplant regimens, 3) the role of radiation in tumor vaccine strategies, 4) study of new radiosensitizers and radioprotectors, and 5) discovery of new targeted therapies for the treatment of solid tumors.

  • Matthew Kohrman

    Matthew Kohrman

    Associate Professor of Anthropology, and by courtesy, of Medicine (Stanford Prevention and Research Center) and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioMatthew Kohrman’s research and writing bring anthropological methods to bear on the ways health, culture, and politics are interrelated. Focusing on the People's Republic of China, he engages various intellectual terrains such as governmentality, gender theory, political economy, critical science studies, narrativity, and embodiment. His first monograph, Bodies of Difference: Experiences of Disability and Institutional Advocacy in the Making of Modern China, raises questions about how embodied aspects of human existence, such as our gender, such as our ability to propel ourselves through space as walkers, cyclists and workers, become founts for the building of new state apparatuses of social provision, in particular, disability-advocacy organizations. Over the last decade, Prof. Kohrman has been involved in research aimed at analyzing and intervening in the biopolitics of cigarette smoking among Chinese citizens. This work, as seen in his recently edited volume--Poisonous Pandas: Chinese Cigarette Manufacturing in Critical Historical Perspectives--expands upon heuristic themes of his earlier disability research and engages in novel ways techniques of public health, political philosophy, and spatial history. More recently, he has begun projects linking ongoing interests at the intersection of phenomenology and political economy with questions regarding environmental attunement and the arts.

  • Christina Kong

    Christina Kong

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImproving the accuracy of cytologic diagnosis through the use of ancillary techniques on specimens obtained by fine needle aspiration biopsy.

    Identifying potential indicators of prognosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    Evaluating the utility of immunohistochemical stains in refining the diagnosis of squamous dysplasia of the cervix, vulva, and head and neck.

  • Eric Kool

    Eric Kool

    George A. and Hilda M. Daubert Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests• Design of cell-permeable reagents for profiling, modifying, and controlling RNAs
    • Developing fluorescent probes of DNA repair pathways, with applications in cancer, aging, and neurodegenerative disease
    • Discovery and development of small-molecule modulators of DNA repair enzymes, with focus on cancer and inflammation

  • Nishita Kothary, MD

    Nishita Kothary, MD

    Professor of Radiology (Interventional Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInterventional Oncology: Percutaneous and transarterial interventions for diagnosis and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors (lung, liver and renal)


    Research Interest:
    Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Oncology

  • Anne Marijn Kramer

    Anne Marijn Kramer

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Stanford Cancer Center

    BioDr. Anne Marijn Kramer, MD, PhD, is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy at Stanford University. Dr. Kramer received her medical degree (with honors) from Amsterdam University in 2013. She conducted her PhD studies at University College London, studying binding kinetics of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells. Her research at Stanford University focuses on developing methods to identify patients who are at high risk for relapse or developing side-effects after receiving CAR T therapy and to understand why these relapses and side-effects occur.

  • Mark Krasnow

    Mark Krasnow

    Paul and Mildred Berg Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests- Lung development and stem cells
    - Neural circuits of breathing and speaking
    - Lung diseases including lung cancer
    - New genetic model organism for biology, behavior, health and conservation

  • Anandi Krishnan

    Anandi Krishnan

    Affiliate, Institute for Immunity, Transplantation, and Infection Operations
    Visiting Scholar, Institute for Immunity, Transplantation, and Infection Operations

    BioDr. Krishnan is a translational scientist with experiences in engineering, biosciences, molecular genetics and hematology. As a current NIH mentored career development awardee (NHGRI 1K08HG010061-01A1), and recent NIH-supported research re-entry (NCATS 3UL1TR001085-04S1), Anandi’s interests are in expanding our understanding of the multifaceted function of anucleate blood platelets and their parent megakaryocytes in human disease.

    Her current work, applying platelet transcriptome profiling and machine learning principles, aims to nominate novel clinically relevant strategies for personalized cancer and antiplatelet/antithrombotic therapy. Continued development of this research is likely to identify key mechanistic variables in platelet- and megakaryocyte-specific response to health and disease.

    Recent contributions in both computational and mechanistic components of platelet and blood research lay the groundwork for sustaining contributions to the field of hematology genomic medicine (e.g. Shen et al PMID 34755136, Seetharam et al PMID 36712071, Kelliher et al PMID 37961700, Thomas & Krishnan PMID 38175681, Abbonante et al PMID 38165147, Jutzi et al PMID 35763665, Campbell et al PMID 36194487). Anandi was also was one of the first non-MD PhD scientist to be awarded the NHGRI K08 Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award, the HTRS Mid-Career Research Award, and the MPN Research Foundation Challenge Grant Award, reflecting her consistent efforts bridging basic and clinical disciplines.

    Select other recognitions include:
    Member, Editorial Board, Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (2024-)
    Ad hoc Reviewer, NIH CSR Cancer and Hematological Disorders Study Section (2023, 24)
    Host Mentor, ISTH Training Fellowship, International Society for Thrombosis and Haemostasis (2023)
    Member, Minority Recruitment Initiatives Subcommittee, American Society of Hematology (2022-26)
    Team Science Leadership Program at Stanford Medicine (2022)
    Peer Mentor, Pathology Stanford Network for Advancement and Promotion (2021)
    Research Mentor, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Meharry-Stanford initiative *mentee selected for oral presentation & won 2nd place at Meharry (2021)
    Thrombosis & Hemostasis Societies of North America Young Investigator Award (2020)
    Invited Member and Panelist, NSF RESET Conference (2020)
    Invited Member/Panelist, iRelaunch Return to Work Conference, Stanford Alumni Association (2018)
    Featured twice by NIH NCATS in the ‘Features & Briefs’ & ‘Diversity Awardee Profiles’ webpages (2017,18)

    Complete list of publications: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=anandi+krishnan&sort_order=asc

  • Calvin Kuo

    Calvin Kuo

    Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study cancer biology, intestinal stem cells (ISC), and angiogenesis. We use primary organoid cultures of diverse tissues and tumor biopsies for immunotherapy modeling, oncogene functional screening and stem cell biology. Angiogenesis projects include blood-brain barrier regulation, stroke therapeutics and anti-angiogenic cancer therapy. ISC projects apply organoid culture and ko mice to injury-inducible vs homeostatic stem cells and symmetric division mechanisms.

  • Allison W. Kurian, M.D., M.Sc.

    Allison W. Kurian, M.D., M.Sc.

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI aim to understand cancer burden and improve treatment quality at the population level. I have a strong focus on genetic risk assessment and precision oncology. I lead epidemiologic studies of cancer risk factors, clinical trials of novel approaches to cancer risk reduction, and decision analyses of strategies to optimize cancer outcomes.

  • David Kurtz

    David Kurtz

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)
    On Partial Leave from 05/01/2024 To 04/30/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImplementation of noninvasive detection of malignancies in the clinic remains difficult due to both technical and clinical challenges. These include necessary improvements in sensitivity and specificity of biomarkers, as well as demonstration of clinical utility of these assays. My research focuses on technical development and implementation of assays to detect and track cancers in order to facilitate personalized disease management.

  • Bernice Kwong, MD

    Bernice Kwong, MD

    Clinical Professor, Dermatology

    BioBernice Kwong, M.D., is Clinical Professor of Dermatology, Director of the Supportive Dermato-Oncology Program, and Director of the Inpatient Dermatology Consult Service. She has a special interest in the management of cutaneous complications that arise in hospitalized patients and cancer patients. She runs the Supportive Dermato-Oncology Program at the Stanford Cancer Center, where she manages skin side effects of cancer therapies including chemotherapy-related skin reactions, radiation dermatitis, and graft-versus-host disease. Dr. Kwong completed medical school at Yale University, and completed her dermatology residency at Stanford University in 2012.