School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 62 Results

  • David Maahs

    David Maahs

    Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioDr David M. Maahs is the Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics, Division Chief of Pediatric Endocrinology, and Associate Chair for Academic Affairs in Pediatrics at Stanford University and the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. He earned his MD followed by Pediatric Residency at the University of New Mexico. After 3 years on New Mexico’s faculty, Dr. Maahs completed a Pediatric Endocrinology fellowship and a concurrent PhD in Epidemiology at the University of Colorado. He remained on Colorado’s faculty for 10 years, advancing to Professor of Pediatrics before moving to Stanford. Prior to his medical career, Dr. Maahs received a BA and MA in English from the University of Kansas and was inspired to pursue a medical career after serving in the Peace Corps with assignments in Tunisia and the Central African Republic.

    Dr. Maahs’ leadership experiences include being a past co-Chair (2013-16) for Protocols and Publications with the Type 1 Diabetes Exchange for which he continues as Director of International Collaborations. This complements his role as President-elect for the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2021-25) and Editor-in-Chief for the 2018 ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines. He served on the Professional Practice Committee for the American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2016-18), which writes the annual ADA Standards of Care. Previously, he served on the ADA Scientific Sessions committee representing the Council on Youth. He has also served on national committees for the American Heart Association, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and multiple journal editorial boards and review committees.

    His scholarly interest is improving care and preventing complications in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Along with Dr Peter Chase, he is author of the 12th and 13th editions of Understanding Diabetes, or ‘Pink Panther,’ which are the most widely used educational books for children newly diagnosed with T1D, distributed internationally by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund (JDRF). More specifically, he has conducted epidemiologic studies that help generate hypotheses for clinical studies, including trials to develop artificial pancreas systems to improve glucose control, lower disease burden, prevent the complications of diabetes, and reduce disparities in diabetes care. He is author or co-author of over 350 research publications. His multi-disciplinary research has been funded by the JDRF, the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the Helmsley Charitable Trust, and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

    Dr Maahs is Associate Director for the recently formed and NIDDK P30 funded Stanford University Diabetes Research Center (https://sdrc.stanford.edu). His collaborations extend to his role as Principal Investigator (PI) or steering committee member for NIH funded multi-center clinical trials including the FLEX, PERL, and ACTION studies as well as multiple Artificial Pancreas clinical trials. Education, mentorship, and training leadership includes being Program Director with Dr. Georgeanna Klingensmith on the Barbara Davis Center T32 and K12 training grants in Pediatric Endocrinology while at the University of Colorado. He is the PI on the Stanford NIH funded K12 "Training Research Leaders in Type 1 Diabetes.' Dr Maahs is also the Associate Chair for Academic Affairs for the Department of Pediatrics.

    While in the Peace Corps, David met his wife, Christine Walravens, who is also a Pediatrician at Stanford. They enjoy outdoor activities and traveling with their adult children.

  • Crystal Mackall

    Crystal Mackall

    Ernest and Amelia Gallo Family Professor and Professor of Pediatrics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRecent clinical studies, by us and others, have demonstrated that genetically engineered T cells can eradicate cancers resistant to all other therapies. We are identifying new targets for these therapeutics, exploring pathways of resistance to current cell therapies and creating next generation platforms to overcome therapeutic resistance. We have discovered novel insights into the biology of human T cell exhaustion and developed approaches to prevent and reverse this phenomenon.

  • David Magnus, Ph.D.

    David Magnus, Ph.D.

    Thomas A. Raffin Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Ethics and Professor (Teaching) of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenetic testing, gene therapy, genetically engineered organisms, and the history of eugenics. Stem cell research and cloning, and egg procurement. Examining ethical issues in reproductive technologies. Organ transplantation – including donation after cardiac death, ethics of listing decisions. End of life issues in both adults and children.

  • Kenneth Mah

    Kenneth Mah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsfluid overload
    acute kidney injury
    improvement science
    quality improvement
    clinical registry data abstraction
    secure data sharing

  • Yvonne Maldonado

    Yvonne Maldonado

    Senior Associate Dean, Faculty Development and Diversity, Taube Professor of Global Health and Infectious Diseases, Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on epidemiologic aspects of viral vaccines and perinatal HIV infection. This includes the molecular epidemiology of factors affecting the immunogenicity of oral polio vaccine (OPV) in developing areas of the world, and now the epidemiology of transmission and circulation of vaccine derived polioviruses in order to assist in global eradication of polio. I also work in development of methods to prevent breastfeeding transmission of HIV in Africa.

  • Ivana Maric

    Ivana Maric

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Neonatology)

    BioIvana Maric is an Assistant Professor in the Pediatrics Department at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on applying machine learning to improving maternal and neonatal health. Her main focus has been on developing machine learning models for early prediction of adverse outcomes of pregnancy from omics and electronic health records data, that could guide development of low-cost, point of care diagnostic tools. Her main interest is in solutions that are applicable worldwide and especially in low-resource settings. Previously, her research focused on information theory, a mathematical discipline tightly related to statistics and machine learning. She is a recipient of the 2021 Rosenkranz Prize awarded for innovative work to improve health in low- or middle-income countries. She is also a co-recipient of the 2013 IEEE Communications Society Best Tutorial Paper Award.

    She received BS degree from the University of Novi Sad, Serbia, MS and PhD at Rutgers University and postdoctoral training at Stanford University. She served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE Communications Letters from 2009 to 2012 and for the Trans. on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies from 2016 to 2018.

  • John D. Mark

    John D. Mark

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Pulmonary Medicine

    BioDr. Mark received his medical degree from the University of Kansas and completed his residency in pediatrics at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri. He then completed a fellowship in pediatric pulmonary medicine at the University of Rochester, Rochester, New York. In 1984, Dr. Mark completed the first fellowship in Pediatric Integrative Medicine at the University of Arizona om 2001. He practices at Packard Children’s Hospital where he utilizes non-pharmaceutical approaches with patients with chronic pulmonary disorders such asthma and cystic fibrosis. He is interested in nutrition, lifestyle changes, exercise and mind/body approaches to healing in an effort to decrease dependence on medication and improve overall lung health.

    Dr. Mark is the past Program Director for the Pediatric Pulmonary fellowship program, Co-Director for the Pediatric Integrative Medicine fellowship program and the Medical Director for the Coordinating and Optimizing Resources Effectively (CORE) Program at Packard Children’s Hospital, Stanford University. This innovative program assists with care coordination and communication with all health care providers for children with complex medical needs. Dr. Mark is also the Chair of the Credentials Committee at Packard Children's Hospital.

  • Ann Marqueling, MD

    Ann Marqueling, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Dermatology
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Pediatrics

    BioAnn Marqueling, M.D., is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Pediatrics at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital. Her clinical interests include general pediatric dermatology, neonatal dermatology, infantile hemangiomas and other vascular anomalies, acne, psoriasis, and pediatric laser and skin surgery. 

  • Alison Marsden

    Alison Marsden

    Douglass M. and Nola Leishman Professor of Cardiovascular Diseases, Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) and of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab at Stanford develops novel computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, and medical devices. We have a particular interest in pediatric cardiology, and use virtual surgery to design novel surgical concepts for children born with heart defects.

  • Nicole Martinez-Martin

    Nicole Martinez-Martin

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Biomedical Ethics) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child & Adolescent Psychiatry & Child Development)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNIH/National Institute of Mental Health
    K01 MH118375-01A1
    “Ethical, Legal and Social Implications in the Use of Digital Technology for Mental Health Applications”

    Greenwall Foundation Making a Difference in Bioethics Grant
    “Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Digital Phenotyping”

  • Daphne O. Martschenko

    Daphne O. Martschenko

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics)

    BioDr. Daphne Oluwaseun Martschenko (she/hers) is an Assistant Professor at the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and former co-organizer of the Race, Empire, and Education Research Collective. Her scholarship identifies novel ways to examine and enhance the ethical and socially responsible conduct, translation, and interpretation of human genetic research.

    Dr. Martschenko is passionate about fostering public and community engagement with controversial scientific research. She has appeared in the New York Times and on numerous podcasts including Freakonomics Radio. Dr. Martschenko’s work is published in publicly accessible media outlets such as Scientific American and The Conversation. In 2023, she was named one of 10 Scientists to Watch by ScienceNews.

    Currently, Dr. Martschenko is writing a book with her friend and colleague Sam Trejo, a quantitative social scientist interested in how social and biological factors jointly shape human development across the life-course. In it, they unpack various social, ethical, and policy issues related to the DNA revolution.