School of Medicine


Showing 1-43 of 43 Results

  • Heather Wakelee

    Heather Wakelee

    Winston Chen and Phyllis Huang Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Wakelee's research is focused on clinical trials and translational efforts in patients with lung cancer and other thoracic malignancies such as thymoma and thymic carcinoma. Other interests include translation projects in thoracic malignancies and collaborations with population scientists regarding lung cancer questions.

  • Paul  J. Wang, MD

    Paul J. Wang, MD

    John R. and Ai Giak L. Singleton Director, Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Wang's research centers on the development of innovative approaches to the treatment of arrhythmias, including more effective catheter ablation techniques, more reliable implantable devices, and less invasive treatments. Dr. Wang's clinical research interests include atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, syncope, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Dr. Wang is committed to addressing disparities in care and is actively involved in increasing diversity in clinical trials.

  • Samantha Wang

    Samantha Wang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    BioSamantha Wang earned her Bachelors degree in Molecular & Cell Biology from the University of California, Berkeley, followed by MD and Masters in Health Science degrees from Yale University School of Medicine. After completing her internal medicine residency at Stanford, Dr. Wang served as Chief Resident for the Internal Medicine Residency and subsequently joined the Division of Hospital Medicine, where she now contributes her expertise in the care of acutely ill adult patients.

    Outside her clinical work, Dr. Wang is deeply committed to medical education, health equity, and patient-centered communication. She has been recognized for her exceptional teaching with the David A. Rytand Teaching Award, and subsequently completed a Rathmann Family Foundation Fellowship in Medical Education in Patient-Centered Care. With leadership roles in both undergraduate and graduate medical education programs, Dr. Wang is actively engaged and committed in shaping the future of health care professionals.

    Dr. Wang is deeply passionate about health equity and has spoken nationally on the topic of racial justice in clinical decision-making. She has received institutional and national funding to develop and study health equity curricula across the continuum of medical education, and is the course director for the "5-Minute Moment for Racial Justice", which advocates for justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion in medical decision making. As a member of the Stanford 25 Bedside Medicine and Presence Groups, she strives to create a more equitable and inclusive learning environment. In her research endeavors, Samantha employs a comprehensive approach, utilizing quantitative and qualitative methodologies, alongside participatory qualitative approaches with community partners. Her focus is on understanding how to effectively teach health equity in the clinical learning environment.

    Her quality improvement work is centered on improving communication skills around serious illness diagnoses, and she has trained students, residents, and other faculty members in these skills. Dr. Wang believes that the best doctors combine intellectual acumen with the ability to connect with patients on a personal level, bringing thoughtfulness, kindness, and authenticity to the bedside. In her care of complex patients with serious diagnoses, she consistently advocates for incorporating loved ones' and the patient's values into the care plan, ensuring a holistic and patient-centered approach.

  • Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD, MSCI

    Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD, MSCI

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLaboratory of Mechanisms in Human Immunity and Disease Pathogenesis

    Antibodies are a critical component of host defense. While the importance of humoral immunity has been recognized for decades, substantial gaps in knowledge remain around how antibodies function, and how their function is regulated, in vivo. Our laboratory performs studies designed to fill in these gaps, with the goal of enabling new vaccine and therapeutic strategies to prevent human disease. My interest in this area culminated from training in medicine, RNA virus biology (PhD), and molecular antibody biology (postdoctoral training). The intersection of these topics, viral immunity and disease pathogenesis, is the focus of our work. The essential question driving our research is why a small subset of people develop severe or fatal disease during viral infection while most infections result in a subclinical or mild outcome, even in at-risk populations. Our hypothesis is that the antibody signaling pathways that are engaged during viral infection through Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs) are a key driver of these distinct outcomes. We are focused on several major unknowns to address this hypothesis: How are antibody effector functions regulated in vivo and does this change in disease? How do distinct signaling pathways engaged by IgG immune complex-FcγR interactions impact host cell genetic regulation and the ultimate inflammatory/immune response? What are the tissue-specific functions that antibodies engage? How does the heterogeneity in post-translational modifications (PTMs) of human antibodies contribute to heterogeneity in viral immunity?



    Current clinical studies:
    Recruiting:

    An Open Label Study of IgG Fc Glycan Composition in Human Immunity
    Principal Investigator: Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD
    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
    NCT01967238

  • Katherine T. Ward, MD

    Katherine T. Ward, MD

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Ward is a board-certified, fellowship-trained geriatrician with Stanford Senior Care in Palo Alto, California. She is also board certified in hospice and palliative medicine and internal medicine. Dr. Ward is a clinical professor of medicine and clinical chief of the Geriatrics Section in the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She specializes in many facets of care for older adults, including internal medicine, dementia care, and palliative care. Dr. Ward uses her extensive experience to teach and implement best practices in nursing home care, geriatric assessment, and care transitions for older adults.

    Dr. Ward’s research interests include early detection of dementia in vulnerable populations, dementia care support programs, and geriatric assessment in diverse populations.

    She has published her research in peer-reviewed journals including The American Journal of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy; The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging; and the Journal of Palliative Medicine. She has served as an ad hoc reviewer for several journals, including Geriatrics. She has also presented posters at annual meetings of the American Geriatrics Society and the Society of General Internal Medicine.

    Dr. Ward is a member of the American College of Physicians and the American Geriatrics Society.

  • Mike Tzuhen Wei

    Mike Tzuhen Wei

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioDr. Wei was born and raised in Taipei, Taiwan. He went to Stanford for his undergraduate studies in Biology and earned his medical degree at Weill Cornell Medical College. Unable to stay far from the Bay Area, he returned to Stanford where he completed his residency in internal medicine and subsequently his fellowship in gastroenterology. Dr. Wei has specific interests in colorectal cancer and Barrett’s esophagus surveillance as well as reflux diagnosis and management. He has an interest in endoscopic resection of large polyps and had received training under Dr. Shai Friedland, a world expert in this field. Dr. Wei work focuses on evaluating new tools, technologies and techniques in gastrointestinal cancer surveillance and management. He has been involved in running several trials in endoscopic management of polyps and evaluating artificial intelligence applications in gastroenterology. His work has been published in American Journal of Gastroenterology, Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Clinical Endoscopy, VideoGIE, and Digestive Diseases and Sciences. He was formerly an Associate Editor for the ACG Case Report Journal (2020-2022) and was on the Board of the Northern California Society of Clinical Gastroenterology. When not in clinic or in endoscopy, Dr. Wei enjoys spending time with his family. He and his family enjoy traveling and exploring new restaurants.

  • Ann Weinacker

    Ann Weinacker

    Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)
    On Partial Leave from 10/16/2023 To 04/15/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Weinacker's research interests center around ICU outcomes. Her specific interests include primary graft dysfunction in lung transplant recipients.

  • Alexa Rachel Weingarden

    Alexa Rachel Weingarden

    Clinical Instructor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioAB in Earth and Planetary Sciences and Biology, Harvard College, 2008
    PhD in Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology, University of Minnesota, 2015
    MD, University of Minnesota, 2017
    Internal Medicine Residency, Stanford, 2017-2019
    Gastroenterology Fellowship, Stanford, 2019 - Present

  • Eva Weinlander

    Eva Weinlander

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWomen's Health
    Mind Body Medicine
    Chronic Disease Management

  • Chad S. Weldy, M.D., Ph.D.

    Chad S. Weldy, M.D., Ph.D.

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs a physician-scientist in the lab of Dr. Quertermous I work to understand the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease and the transcriptional and epigenomic mechanisms of atherosclerosis. My work is focused across four main areas of cardiovascular genetics and mechanisms of coronary artery disease and smooth muscle biology:
    1.Vascular smooth muscle specific ADAR1 mediated RNA editing of double stranded RNA and activation of the double stranded RNA receptor MDA5
    2.Defining on single cell resolution the cellular and epigenomic features of human vascular disease across vascular beds of differing embryonic origin
    3.CRISPRi screening with targeted perturb seq (TAPseq) to identify novel CAD genes in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells
    4.Investigation of the epigenetic and molecular basis of coronary artery disease and smooth muscle cell transition in mice with conditional smooth muscle genetic deletion of CAD genes Pdgfd and Sox9

    My work with Dr. Quertermous is focused on discovery of causal mechanisms of disease through leveraging human genetics with sophisticated molecular biology, single cell sequencing technologies, and mouse models of disease. This work attempts to apply multiple scientific research arms to ultimately lead to novel understandings of vascular disease and discover important new therapeutic approaches for drug discovery.

    Grant funding received for this work:

    Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award (K08)(NIH/NHLBI, 1 K08 HL167699-01), Submitted June, 2022. PI: Weldy, Chad
    •Title of proposal: “ADAR Mediated RNA editing is a causal mechanism in coronary artery disease”.
    •Pending 08/01/2023 Start date
    •$850,000 over 5 years

    Career Development Award, American Heart Association (AHA CDA)(23CDA1042900), July, 2023 – June, 2026. PI: Weldy, Chad
    •Title of proposal: “Linking RNA editing to coronary artery calcification and disease”
    •Activation on 07/01/2023
    •$231,000 over three years

    NIH Loan Repayment Program (LRP) Award (NIH/NHLBI) Renewal Award, July, 2023. PI: Weldy, Chad
    •Title of proposal: “RNA editing is a causal mechanism of coronary artery disease”

    Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Postdoctoral Fellowship (F32) (NIH/NHLBI, 1 F32 HL160067-01), July, 2021. PI: Weldy, Chad
    • Titled, “A transcriptional network which governs smooth muscle transition is mediated by causal coronary artery disease gene PDGFD”
    •*Received perfect score with impact score 10, 1st percentile

    NIH Loan Repayment Program (LRP) Award (NIH/NHLBI), July, 2021. PI: Weldy, Chad
    •Title of proposal: "Single cell transcriptomic and epigenomic features of human atherosclerosis".
    •This will award up to $100,000 towards student loans over the next 24 months with opportunity for renewal after 24 months.

  • Wen-Kai Weng, MD, PhD

    Wen-Kai Weng, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy) and, by courtesy, of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interest is on immunotherapy (including allogeneic transplant) of cancer. I have studies the mechanism of monoclonal antibody therapy in lymphoma patients and am currently working on designing new strategy to enhance the clinical efficacy of antibody therapy by infusing expanded NK cells. I am also interested in using tumor vaccine along with hematopoietic cell transplant.

  • Cornelia Weyand

    Cornelia Weyand

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAutoimmunity
    Chronic inflammatory disease
    Metabolic control of immune function

  • Matthew Wheeler

    Matthew Wheeler

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTranslational research in rare and undiagnosed diseases. Basic and clinical research in cardiomyopathy genetics, mechanisms, screening, and treatment. Investigating novel agents for treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and new mechanisms in heart failure. Cardiovascular screening and genetics in competitive athletes, disease gene discovery in cardiomyopathy and rare disease. Informatics approaches to rare disease and multiomics. Molecular transducers of physical activity bioinformatics.

  • Jennifer Williams

    Jennifer Williams

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine

    BioDr. Williams is a fellowship-trained pulmonologist specializing in pulmonary critical care medicine. She has board certification in pulmonary medicine, critical care medicine, and internal medicine.

    She is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy & Critical Care Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    For each patient, Dr. Williams develops a comprehensive and compassionate care plan. Her goal is to help every individual achieve the best possible lung health and quality of life.

    Patient reviews praise the quality of the care she delivers, her thoroughness, and her patient skills.

    Dr. Williams has participated in clinical research studies. She has published articles on autoimmune disease involving interstitial lung disease, COPD, and life-threatening pulmonary complications associated with leukemia. She also co-authored an article on the development of guidelines for identifying and managing post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms associated with critical illness.

    Her work has appeared in peer-reviewed journals including the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Internal Medicine, and elsewhere. She also has written chapters in books on critical care medicine and clinical decision-making.

    Dr. Williams speaks English and both written and oral medical Spanish. In her free time, she enjoys soccer and distance running.

  • Marilyn Winkleby, PhD, MPH

    Marilyn Winkleby, PhD, MPH

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiovascular disease epidemiology, health of socioeconomically disadvantaged and ethnic minority populations, social determinants of health, community-based intervention research, youth advocacy and mentorship, promoting diversity in health professions

  • Dean Winslow

    Dean Winslow

    Professor of Medicine (Hospital Medicine), by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and Senior Fellow, by courtesy, at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioDean Winslow, MD is Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics and is a Senior Fellow (courtesy) at CISAC/Freeman Spogli Institute. He has served on the Stanford faculty since 1998 and from 2003-2008 as Co-Director of Stanford's Infectious Diseases Fellowship Training Program. He was in private practice in Wilmington, Delaware where he started the state’s first multidisciplinary clinic for HIV patients in 1985. In 1988 he joined the DuPont Company where he worked both as a bench scientist on HIV drug resistance then designed the clinical trials supporting FDA approval of efavirenz. In 1999 he became Vice President of Regulatory Affairs at Visible Genetics Inc. and led the FDA clearance of the TRUGENE HIV-1 drug resistance test. Dr. Winslow joined the staff at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in 2003, where he served as Chief of the Division of AIDS Medicine and later as Chair of the Department of Medicine. In 2015 he was appointed Vice Chair of the Department of Medicine at Stanford and Academic Physician-In-Chief at Stanford/ValleyCare. He was a Resident Fellow in Robinson House 2013-2017 and was visiting faculty at Oxford University in 2017. He was Lead Physician for the US Antarctic Program of the National Science Foundation 2019-2020 based at McMurdo Station, Antarctica. In 2021 he took leave from Stanford to lead the US COVID-19 Testing and Diagnostic Working Group. He also served as CDC Senior Advisor to Operation ALLIES WELCOME and Chief Medical Officer for the Southwest Border Migrant Health Task Force before returning to Stanford in July 2022.

    Dr. Winslow is a Master of the American College of Physicians, Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. He is the author of 93 papers. He is,a member of the IDSA Sepsis Task Force, and previously served as Chair of the Standards and Practice Guidelines Committee.

    Colonel Winslow entered the Air National Guard in 1980 and was a Distinguished Graduate of the USAF School of Aerospace Medicine. He served as Commander of the 159th Medical Group 1992-1995 and was State Air Surgeon, Delaware Air National Guard 1995-2011. He served as ANG Assistant to the Commander, 59th Medical Wing, Joint Base San Antonio 2011-2014. Colonel Winslow deployed to the Middle East six times after 9/11 as a flight surgeon supporting combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. From Jan-April 2003 Colonel Winslow was the flight surgeon responsible for combat rescue operations from Tikrit to northern Iraq. In 2005 he coordinated military public health in Louisiana in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In 2006 Colonel Winslow served as an ER physician at the United States Air Force 447th EMEDS (combat hospital) in Baghdad and in 2008 he served as hospital commander during the Iraq surge. He is a 2007 graduate of Air War College. He served as an infectious disease consultant to the USAF Surgeon General. In 2017 Dr. Winslow was nominated by the President to serve as Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs. He has 3,000 civilian and 1150 military flying hours including 431 combat hours and 263 combat sorties. He has extensive operational experience in fighter, tactical airlift, and combat rescue missions. He holds an FAA Airline Transport Pilot license.

    Since 2006 Dr. Winslow has arranged medical care in the U.S. for 28 Iraqi children who have complicated medical conditions for which care is not available in Iraq. In 2015, Dr. Winslow and his wife, Dr. Julie Parsonnet, created The Eagle Fund of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, which provides aid to middle eastern and central American refugees. In 2018 he co-founded Scrubs Addressing the Firearms Epidemic (SAFE), which unites health care professionals to address gun violence in the US as a public health issue and to advocate for education, research, and evidence-backed policy to reduce gun violence.

  • Ronald Witteles

    Ronald Witteles

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1) Amyloidosis -- Optimizing diagnosis/therapy and discovering new treatments
    2) CardioOncology -- Understanding, treating, and preventing cancer therapy-induced cardiotoxicity
    3) Sarcoidosis -- Exploring novel diagnostic modalities and determining optimal treatment, with a focus on cardiac sarcoidosis

  • Temesgen 'Tem'  Woldeyesus

    Temesgen 'Tem' Woldeyesus

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Tem (Temesgen) is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health. He obtained his medical degree at UCSF and continued his residency training at UCSF in Family and Community Medicine. He was selected as Chief Resident, where he further developed as a clinical educator and administrator, prior to joining the faculty group at Stanford. His academic interests include alternative models of care, clinical informatics, and digital health equity.

    Dr. Tem Woldeyesus practices full-spectrum family medicine, which includes care for the entire age spectrum. He is driven to provide evidence-based, high quality, culturally competent care.

    He is a native of the Bay Area. Outside of work, he enjoys spending time with his fiancée, playing (and watching) basketball, and exploring national parks.

  • Jennifer Woo, MD

    Jennifer Woo, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    BioDr. Woo is a board-certified, fellowship-trained cardiologist with the Adult Congenital Heart Program at Stanford Health Care. She is also a clinical assistant professor in the Divisions of Cardiovascular Medicine and Pediatric Cardiology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She diagnoses and treats a range of cardiovascular diseases, with a focus on adult congenital heart disease. Dr. Woo has Level III training with the National Board of Echocardiography, a certification that recognizes her experience in complex cardiac imaging. She also has specialized expertise in cardiac MRI. Each of her patients receives a personalized, comprehensive care plan delivered with compassion.

    Dr. Woo is heavily involved in adult congenital heart disease research. She has a particular interest in imaging and heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease. She has received grant funding for her work, including from the Adult Congenital Heart Association. The National Institutes of Health awarded granted her the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award.

    She has published research in several peer-reviewed journals, such as the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and Pediatric Cardiology. Dr. Woo has presented her findings at regional and national meetings, including the Adult Congenital Heart Disease Bay Area Conference and the International Symposium on Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    Dr. Woo is a member of the Adult Congenital Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, and American Society of Echocardiography.

  • Hannah Wright

    Hannah Wright

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioHannah Wright, MMS, PA-C has been a practicing physician assistant since 2010. She received her PA education at Stanford and earned a Master of Medical Science degree from Saint Francis University. She has worked in Family Practice, Internal Medicine, Gynecology. Since 2013 she has worked in the Stanford Express Care Clinic. She is also a Clinical Instructor of Medicine and an E4C-PA in the Stanford Masters of Science in PA Studies Program.

  • Bryan Wu, MD

    Bryan Wu, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDr. Wu is a board-certified cardiologist at Stanford Health Care. He is also a clinical assistant professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. His areas of clinical focus include general and preventive cardiology with a particular interest in cardiac imaging. Dr. Wu has board certification in echocardiography, cardiovascular CT, and cardiac nuclear imaging.

    Dr. Wu speaks fluent Chinese and Spanish and embraces racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic diversity in his clinical care. He has international clinical/research experiences in Italy and Mexico, and truly enjoys meeting and working with people from distinctive backgrounds.

    Dr. Wu is passionate about clinical research. He has pursued scholarly work on the utilization of therapeutic drug monitoring for antihypertensive therapy and statins to help patients from low socioeconomic backgrounds improve their medication adherence. He is also involved in research on advanced cardiac imaging and has actively investigated the applications of cardiac CT in electrophysiology interventions.

    Dr. Wu’s research has been published in peer-reviewed journals such as the International Journal of Cardiology and Journal of Vascular Surgery. He has presented his work at regional and national meetings, including the American Heart Association’s annual Scientific Sessions.

    Dr. Wu is a member of the American College of Physicians, American Heart Association, and American Medical Association.

  • Joseph  C. Wu, MD, PhD

    Joseph C. Wu, MD, PhD

    Director, Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Simon H. Stertzer, MD, Professor and Professor of Radiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDrug discovery, drug screening, and disease modeling using iPSC.

  • Joy Wu

    Joy Wu

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory focuses on the pathways that regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into the osteoblast and adipocyte lineages. We are also studying the role of osteoblasts in the hematopoietic and cancer niches in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  • Sean M. Wu

    Sean M. Wu

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab seeks to identify mechanisms regulating cardiac lineage commitment during embryonic development and the biology of cardiac progenitor cells in development and disease. We believe that by understanding the transcriptional and epigenetic basis of cardiomyocyte growth and differentiation, we can identify the most effective ways to repair diseased adult hearts. We employ mouse and human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as well as rodents as our in vivo models for investigation.