School of Medicine


Showing 1-36 of 36 Results

  • Matthew C. Baker, MD MS

    Matthew C. Baker, MD MS

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    BioDr. Baker is the Clinical Chief in the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University. He received his bachelor's degree from Pomona College, his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, and his master's degree in Epidemiology and Clinical Research from Stanford University. He completed his Internal Medicine residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital and his Rheumatology fellowship at Stanford University. Dr. Baker has established a clinical research program that is focused on clinical trials, epidemiological studies, and bench-to-bedside translational research. He has designed and led investigator-initiated and industry sponsored clinical trials with a focus on sarcoidosis, IgG4-related disease, and rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, he is the Co-Director of the Stanford Multidisciplinary Sarcoidosis Program and collaborates with other team members to advance sarcoidosis clinical care and research.

  • Yashaar Chaichian, MD

    Yashaar Chaichian, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSystemic lupus erythematosus
    CTD-associated interstitial lung disease

  • Alvina Dor-Yan Chu

    Alvina Dor-Yan Chu

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioAlvina Chu, MD, is an adjunct clinical faculty member within the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology. She has practiced rheumatology for more than 10 years, specializing in treatment of a wide range of chronic inflammatory conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, vasculitis, and gout.

    She holds a longstanding scientific interest in immunology, especially the role of B-cell signaling mechanisms in lupus and other autoimmune diseases.

    In addition to taking care of patients in clinic and in the hospital, Dr. Chu enjoys teaching and mentoring fellows, residents, and medical students.

  • Lorinda Chung

    Lorinda Chung

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology) and, by courtesy, of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests focus on all aspects of systemic sclerosis. I am currently involved in clinical, translational, and epidemiologic research in these areas, and dedicate a substantial portion of my research time to investigator-initiated and multi-center clinical trials of novel therapeutics for the treatment of systemic sclerosis.

  • Edgar Engleman

    Edgar Engleman

    Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDendritic cells, macrophages, NK cells and T cells; functional proteins and genes; immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer, autoimmune disease, neurodegenerative disease and metabolic disease.

  • Robert Michael Fairchild

    Robert Michael Fairchild

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fairchild’s research interests center on novel applications of ultrasonography in rheumatologic disease. Current active research endeavors include using ultrasound 1) to evaluate articular and soft tissue manifestations of systemic sclerosis, 2) to screen, detect and monitor of connective tissue disease associated interstitial lung disease, 3) and to examine the incidence of immune checkpoint inhibitor related adverse events and inflammatory arthritis.

  • C. Garrison Fathman

    C. Garrison Fathman

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab of molecular and cellular immunology is interested in research in the general field of T cell activation and autoimmunity. We have identified and characterized a gene (GRAIL) that seems to control regulatory T cell (Treg) responsiveness by inhibiting the Treg IL-2 receptor desensitization. We have characterized a gene (Deaf1) that plays a major role in peripheral tolerance in T1D. Using PBC gene expression, we have provisionally identified a signature of risk and progression in T1D.

  • Mark Genovese

    Mark Genovese

    James W. Raitt M.D. Professor, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical trials and interventions in the rheumatic diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis,Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic Sclerosis, Osteoarthritis.

  • Jorg Goronzy

    Jorg Goronzy

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsT cell homeostasis and function with age

  • Halsted Holman

    Halsted Holman

    Berthold and Belle N. Guggenhime Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOrganization of community health care programs; management of chronic disease; introduction and evaluation of patient education and self-care practices; evaluation of health care outcomes and health system performance.

  • Jison Hong

    Jison Hong

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioDr. Hong specializes in the diagnosis, evaluation and management of all rheumatologic diseases. She has a special interest in rheumatologic disease manifestations in patients with cancer and receiving cancer treatments. She collaborates with researchers to recruit patients for clinical trials and works with a research coordinator to collect blood and patient demographic information to study the effects of rheumatoid arthritis on cardiovascular disease.

  • Audra Horomanski

    Audra Horomanski

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioDr. Horomanski specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of rheumatologic diseases. She received her undergraduate degree from Case Western Reserve University, medical degree from Wright State University, and completed her Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at Stanford University. She is the Director of the Stanford Vasculitis Clinic where she manages the complex care of patients with all types of vasculitis and works closely with partners in related specialties. She has a specific interest in clinical trials and a Graduate Certificate in Epidemiology and Clinical Research. Dr. Horomanski also received training in musculoskeletal ultrasound from the USSONAR program and is an integral part of Stanford's Diagnostic and Interventional Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Clinic. Additional areas of research include the application of ultrasound in the study and management of rheumatologic diseases.

  • Tamiko Katsumoto

    Tamiko Katsumoto

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioTamiko Katsumoto, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University. She earned her MD from the University of California, San Francisco. She completed her internal medicine residency and rheumatology fellowship at UCSF, including a postdoc in the immunology lab of Dr. Arthur Weiss. She is passionate about sustainable whole-food plant-rich diets with respect to both individual and planetary health, and she is fascinated by the impact of diet on inflammation and autoimmunity. She serves as the director of the Stanford Immune Related Toxicity Working Group, a multidisciplinary group which aims to improve the quality of care of cancer patients on immune checkpoint inhibitors. Dr. Katsumoto’s research interests include the discovery of novel biomarkers to predict the development of immune-related adverse events (irAEs) in patients on immune checkpoint inhibitor therapies, and optimizing the management of such complications. She has a particular interest in how diet and the microbiome may impact inflammatory conditions, including irAEs. She is fascinated by the relationship between cancer and autoimmune diseases such as scleroderma and dermatomyositis, and the paraneoplastic manifestations of various cancers. She is involved in several clinical trials at Stanford and has spent time at Genentech, where she led several clinical trials in immunology.

  • Wilson F Kuswanto, MD, PhD

    Wilson F Kuswanto, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology
    Postdoctoral Medical Fellow, Immunology and Rheumatology

    BioDr. Kuswanto is a physician scientist, board-certified Rheumatologist and instructor of medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is currently working with Garry Nolan, PhD and William Robinson MD, PhD to unravel the tissue immune responses in Rheumatologic diseases. Dr. Kuswanto obtained his medical degree at Harvard Medical School, earning his PhD in Immunology with Diane Mathis and Christophe Benoist where he uncovered the role of the immune system in tissue repair and regeneration. He later moved to Stanford University to complete his residency training and Rheumatology fellowship.

  • Amy Ladd, MD

    Amy Ladd, MD

    Elsbach-Richards Professor of Surgery and Professor, by courtesy, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology) and of Surgery (Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Interests
    1. The kinematics and forces associated with thumb carpometcarpal (CMC) function and pathology
    2. The anatomy, microstructure, and immunofluorescent characteristics of the thumb CMC joint
    3. Pathomechaniics of CMC arthritis: biomechanical wear, injury, genetic, and environmental causes
    4. Archiving, vitalizing, and innovating medical and surgical knowledge, most recently with innovative iBook monographs

  • Tobias Lanz

    Tobias Lanz

    Instructor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioTobias Lanz, MD is an Instructor at the Department of Medicine and incoming Assistant Professor at the Institute for Immunity, Transplantation, and Infection and the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford. His research focuses on B cell biology in neuroimmunological diseases and rheumatic diseases with neurological manifestations. He uses high-throughput screening technologies, and methods from structural and cell biology to identify new autoantigens and to understand how certain self-reactive B cells escape tolerance mechanisms. He is particularly interested in molecular mechanisms that explain the association between Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) and autoimmunity.
    Tobias went to medical school at the Eberhard Karls University in Tübingen, Germany and at the University College of London. He wrote his MD thesis at Dr. Michael Platten's laboratory at the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research in Tübingen, Germany before joining Dr. Lawrence Steinman’s neuroimmunological laboratory at Stanford as a research scholar. After medical school he pursued his scientific and clinical training at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the Department of Neurology at the University Hospital in Heidelberg, Germany. In 2015 he joined Dr. William Robinson’s lab at Stanford, where he investigated environmental triggers of autoimmunity, including viruses and milk consumption. In his most recent work, he characterized the B cell repertoire in the spinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and identified molecular mimicry between EBV EBNA1 and the glial cellular adhesion molecule GlialCAM as a driver of neuroinflammation (Lanz et al., Nature, 2022). His long term objective is to leverage these newly discovered mechanistic insights to develop next-generation biomarkers and therapeutics for autoimmune diseases.

  • Kate Lorig

    Kate Lorig

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCommunity based psycoeducational intervention studies of disease self management for people with chronic diseases. arthritis, lung diseases, heart disease AIDs, low back pain and diabetes. Programs and studies in Spanish and English. Interventions are in small groups, mailed or on the Internet.

  • Quan Dong Nguyen, MD, MSc

    Quan Dong Nguyen, MD, MSc

    Professor of Ophthalmology and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics and of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have focused our research on the development of novel therapies and innovative assessment and diagnostic imaging technologies for retinal vascular and ocular inflammatory disorders, specifically diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and uveitis. Building on our initial work describing the role of hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME), We have become interested in the biochemical mechanisms that would presumably lead to DME. During the past decade, our research has contributed to the body of evidences that defines the important role of anti-VEGF therapies in DME and AMD, as well as the role of the mTOR pathway and various interleukins in the pathogenesis of uveitis.

    We have launched a productive and well-funded clinical research program while at the same time providing clinical care to patients with uveitis and retinal vascular diseases and fulfilling significant teaching and administrative assignments. We have established a number of key collaborators both within and outside the institutions. In addition, we have also established Center in Baltimore and now in Silicon Valley, which has excelled in conducting proof-of concept, early-phase multi-center clinical trials and studies, exploring the clinical disease manifestations and the efficacy of various pharmacologic agents in retinal, uveitic, and ocular inflammatory disorders.

  • William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    William H. Robinson, MD PhD

    James W. Raitt, M.D. Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab investigates the molecular mechanisms of and develops therapies to treat autoimmune and rheumatic diseases, with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, and osteoarthritis.

    The overriding objectives of our laboratory are:
    1. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying autoimmune and rheumatic diseases.
    2. To investigate the role of innate immune inflammation in osteoarthritis.
    3. To develop novel diagnostics and therapeutics

  • Neha Shah

    Neha Shah

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioDr Shah's clinical and research interests lie in Integrative Rheumatology, healing-oriented medicine that takes account of the whole patient, including all aspects of lifestyle. It emphasizes the therapeutic relationship between practitioner and patient, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapies, including those outside the realm of allopathic medicine. Specifically, she is interested in exploring the impact of diet/nutrition/botanicals on inflammation as it pertains to rheumatic diseases such as gout, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, psoriatic arthritis and other autoimmune conditions, as well as studying the impact of other lifestyle approaches such as mindful meditation, sleep, yoga, stress reduction, etc. on disease burden and quality of life of patients with rheumatic diseases. She boarded in Lifestyle Medicine and has advanced training in Functional Medicine. Dr Shah is currently pursuing additional training in Ayurvedic Medicine.

  • Julia Fridman Simard

    Julia Fridman Simard

    Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Immunology & Rheumatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine)

    BioJulia Fridman Simard, ScD, is an Associate Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health, and, by courtesy, of Medicine in Immunology and Rheumatology and Obstetrics and Gynecology in Maternal Fetal Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Simard earned her Masters and Doctorate of Science in Epidemiology degrees at the Harvard School of Public Health. During that time she trained with investigators at the Section of Clinical Sciences, Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Cardiovascular Epidemiology Research Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. In 2008, Dr. Simard relocated to Sweden to begin a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. She became an Assistant Professor in their Clinical Epidemiology Unit in 2011, and was later honored with a Karolinska Institutet Teaching Award. Leveraging the population-based registers of Sweden, Dr. Simard initiated a national register linkage study to examine the utility of registers in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) research and develop an extensive data repository for future epidemiologic investigations.

    While maintaining a close collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet, she joined Stanford’s Epidemiology faculty in 2013. Dr. Simard studies outcomes such as malignancy, stroke, infection, and mortality, in patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases with a focus on systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently her primary research focus has shifted to the intersection between reproductive epidemiology and rheumatic disease fueled by a K01 career development award from the NIH (NIAMS) to study maternal and fetal outcomes in systemic lupus pregnancy. This led to collaborations with colleagues at Stanford, throughout the US, and abroad, and a series of projects focused on the diagnosis of preeclampsia and associated risks in pregnant women with systemic lupus. Dr. Simard was awarded a Peter Joseph Pappas Research Grant from the Preeclampsia Foundation for her lab's work examining preeclampsia risk in high-risk populations, and a McCormick Faculty Award from Stanford Medicine to take important steps towards disentangling preeclampsia from lupus nephritis. Dr. Simard is leading an international study of hydroxychloroquine in lupus pregnancy leveraging mixed methods in partnership with qualitative researchers, patients, clinicians, and epidemiologists in Sweden, Canada, and in the United States.

    In addition to these issues of misclassification in reproductive rheumatology questions, Dr. Simard's lab is also interested in how misclassification, missed opportunities, and misdiagnosis contribute to disparities in complex conditions such as systemic lupus. In addition to methodologic issues around misclassification and bias and the largely clinical epidemiology focus of her work, Dr. Simard's work examines social determinants of health and health disparities. Dr. Simard was recently awarded an R01 from NIH (NIAID) to study the role of cognitive and unconscious bias in clinical decision making for female-predominant diseases including lupus.

  • Suzanne Tamang

    Suzanne Tamang

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    BioI use data science and informatics techniques to study human diseases and their impact on population health outcomes and healthcare spending. Also, to enable new knowledge discovery and for the purpose of building next generation informatics tools for population health management and measurement. I bring over fifteen years of experience with large and diverse population health datasets. For example, population-based registers in Denmark and in the US, the Department of Veterans Affairs Corporate Data Warehouse, the Rheumatology Informatics System for Effectiveness, Stanford and UCSF electronic medical records, administrative healthcare claims and activity monitoring data. I have also developed natural language processing tools for a variety of biomedical use cases. Paired with the practical skills and knowledge that I have gained through working within integrated delivery systems across the US, my extensive training in computer science, biology, and health services research uniquely positions me to build next generation tools to support integrated health delivery systems and population health.

    As an Instructor in the Department of Biomedical Data Science at Stanford, I manage a small research group, where I mentor all levels of students and advanced trainees, within the School of Medicine and more broadly within the University. I also lead the Stanford Working Group, Stats for Social Good.

  • PJ Utz

    PJ Utz

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long-term research goal of the Utz laboratory is to understand autoimmunity, autoantibodies, and how tolerance is broken and can be reestablished.

  • Cornelia Weyand

    Cornelia Weyand

    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAutoimmunity
    Chronic inflammatory disease
    Metabolic control of immune function