School of Medicine


Showing 1-56 of 56 Results

  • Jason Andrews

    Jason Andrews

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory aims to develop and test innovative approaches to the diagnosis, treatment and control of infectious diseases in resource-limited settings. We draw upon multiple fields including mathematical modeling, microbial genetics, field epidemiology, statistical inference and biodesign to work on challenging problems in infectious diseases, with an emphasis on tuberculosis and tropical diseases.

  • Niaz Banaei

    Niaz Banaei

    Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHis research interests include (1) development, assessment, and improvement of novel infectious diseases diagnostics, (2) enhancing the quality of C. difficile diagnostic results, and (3) characterization of M. tuberculosis virulence determinants.

  • Brian Blackburn

    Brian Blackburn

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests include parasitology and global health; I've investigated cryptosporidium and angiostrongylus outbreaks; schistosoma/strongyloides seroprevalence in refugees, and the distribution and impact of ITNs for malaria and filariasis prevention in Nigeria and India. I have done clinical and programmatic work at teaching hospitals in Liberia and Bangladesh and have opportunities for research in Bangladesh and Kenya, in collaboration with ICDDR,B and CDC, Kenya

  • Catherine Blish

    Catherine Blish

    George E. and Lucy Becker Professor in Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe major goal of our research is to gain insight into the prevention and control of HIV and other viral pathogens by studying the interplay between the virus and the host immune response. We investigate the role of various arms of the immune response, but with a particular focus on NK cells. We hope to gain additional insights into control of infectious diseases by studying how pregnancy modulates immune responses.

  • Paul Bollyky

    Paul Bollyky

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsChronic bacterial infections are a major health care problem. Our lab is interested in understanding the host and microbial factors that perpetuate chronic infections and in developing novel therapeutic interventions to improve human health.

  • Hector Fabio Bonilla

    Hector Fabio Bonilla

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioAs a young physician at Louisiana State University, Dr. Bonilla focused on the Clinical Management of HIV/AIDS and HCV, two neglected and stigmatized diseases for which effective therapies were in their infancy. While learning the clinical aspects of the two diseases, Dr. Bonilla saw a need to create and organize a support community to promote understanding and management of the conditions. Subsequently, he went to Summa Health System in Akron, Ohio, and he continued his work where he specialized in HIV/HCV as well as in Infectious Diseases Clinical Practice. In addition to teaching medical residents and students, Dr. Bonilla participated in numerous clinical trials and developed clinical research projects. Furthermore, he led the Infection Renal Transplant Program, HIV and HCV clinics, and he participated in several cooperative studies with Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Bonilla’s interest in academia led him to the University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center where he was an Assistant Professor, Clinician, and Medical Educator in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases. Due to his interest in cytokines and immunological responses, Dr. Bonilla became a researcher at ImmunoScience Inc., a biotechnology company in California that works to develop a therapeutic HIV vaccine. Dr. Bonilla’s experience of treating HIV/HCV combined with his interest in inflammatory response is the driving force behind his desire to understand ME/CFS. Dr. Bonilla is a strong patient advocate, and he believes in integrated care—care in which physicians communicate and coordinate efforts to deliver the best medical outcome for patients. His ME/CFS patients are his inspiration, and he is committed to continuing research to seek answers to their health challenges.

  • Sudeb C. Dalai

    Sudeb C. Dalai

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Sudeb Dalai, MD PhD is an Infectious Disease Physician at Stanford University School of Medicine and the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. Currently a Clinical Assistant Professor (Teaching) at Stanford, he has taught courses and conducted research in academia/industry for over 18 years.

    Dr. Dalai completed his undergraduate degree at MIT, MD and MS at Stanford, PhD in Epidemiology at UC Berkeley School of Public Health, Internal Medicine Residency at UCSD, and Fellowship in Infectious Diseases at Stanford. He has received numerous teaching and leadership awards and research grants and has co-authored multiple peer-reviewed publications. His work has been supported by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Paul and Daisy Soros Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Dalai is an internationally-invited speaker and has been featured in multiple media outlets including ABC, NBC, Good Morning America, US News & World Report, Buzzfeed, and The Huffington Post. In 2003 he was elected to the MIT Board of Trustees and in 2020 he was voted as a Board Member of the MIT Club of Northern California.

  • Stanley Deresinski

    Stanley Deresinski

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Deresinski received his medical degree from the University of Illinois College of Medicine and received training in Internal Medicine there and at Stanford, where he also completed a fellowship in Infectious Diseases. For 3 decades, he maintained a private practice in Infectious Disease, HIV, and Travel Medicine and was Hospital Epidemiologist at Sequoia Hospital where he also served as President of the Medical Staff for 2 years. He was also Associate Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and for 14 years was Director of the AIDS Program at the Santa Valley Medical Center, a Stanford-affiliated public teaching hospital. During that time he won several teaching awards at Stanford. In 1987, he founded the AIDS Community Research Consortium, serving as its Medical Director and Chairman of the Board for almost 2 decades. He was also Site Principal Investigator for the Stanford ACTU and the California Collaborative Treatment Group and has worked on AIDS education in Kampala, Uganda. Dr. Deresinski is currently Clinical Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine at Stanford and is Medical Director of the Stanford Antimicrobial Stewardship Program and Chair of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee and of the Specialty Drugs Subcommittee. He has special interests in antimicrobial resistance, optimal antimicrobial use, fungal infections, and infections in immunocomopromised hosts.

    Dr. Deresinski has published more than 100 peer-reviewed papers as well as number of book chapters. He is a Section Editor of Clinical Infectious Diseases and is a past Chair of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Standards and Practice Guidelines Committee as well as member of the IDSA Board of Directors. He is a member of the HIVMA, in addition to a number of other societies including SHEA and is a Fellow in the American College of Physicians as well as IDSA. He is a past winner of the IDSA Watanakunokorn Clinician of the YearAward.

  • Thomas Duane Dieringer

    Thomas Duane Dieringer

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioI have worked over the last 10 years to build a foundation for a career in academic infectious diseases by providing thoughtful dedicated care for my patients, conducting clinically focused research, and remaining an engaged educator for developing physicians. My passion for the study of infectious diseases has led me to complete a general infectious diseases fellowship and additional focused training in transplant and immunocompromised infectious diseases. I will continue to work diligently with my colleagues focusing on the growth of medical learners, advancing patient centered clinical research, and striving to provide the highest quality of care to patients.

  • Shirit Einav

    Shirit Einav

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur basic research program focuses on understanding the roles of virus-host interactions in viral infection and disease pathogenesis via molecular and systems virology single cell approaches. This program is combined with translational efforts to apply this knowledge for the development of broad-spectrum host-centered antiviral approaches to combat emerging viral infections, including dengue, coronaviruses, encephalitic alphaviruses, and Ebola, and means to predict progression to severe disease.

  • Jessica Ferguson

    Jessica Ferguson

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Ferguson is a board certified Infectious Disease specialist. She specializes in the treatment of immunocompromised patients, including patients who have undergone bone marrow or solid organ transplantation and patients with hematologic or solid malignancies on chemotherapy.

  • Philip Grant

    Philip Grant

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioMy research focuses on antiretroviral therapy and complications of HIV including immune reconstitution inflammatory disease, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disease.

  • Dora Ho

    Dora Ho

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Ho did her PhD work in HSV pathogenesis and postdoctoral research in CNS gene therapy with viral vectors. She is currently the clinical chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine. She specializes in infection complications of immunocompromised patients, such as those with cancers, solid organ transplant or bone marrow transplant.

  • Mark Holodniy

    Mark Holodniy

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research program is currently focused in three areas: 1) Translational research (viral evolution and antiviral resistance prevalence and development), 2) Clinical trials (diagnostic assay/medical device, antimicrobials and immunomodulators), and 3) Health services research focusing on public health, infectious diseases and clinical outcomes.

  • Marisa Holubar

    Marisa Holubar

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Marisa Holubar specializes in the treatment of infectious diseases and works primarily in the inpatient setting. She is particularly interested in antimicrobial stewardship.

  • Prasanna Jagannathan

    Prasanna Jagannathan

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    BioI am an Infectious Diseases physician-scientist with a research program in human immunology of malaria and clinical trials of immune modulatory interventions. Our group has been conducting detailed longitudinal cohort studies in children and pregnant women in order to study how repeated malaria shapes the cellular immune response. We are also studying how malaria control interventions such as antimalarial chemoprevention and vector control shape the acquisition and/or maintenance of protective immunity to malaria. We have expanded this work to not only include studying the mechanisms driving naturally acquired immunity to malaria, but other infectious diseases, including SARS CoV-2. We have also lead and/or participated in studies evaluating therapeutic strategies for patients with mild to moderate COVID-19.

  • Shanthi Kappagoda

    Shanthi Kappagoda

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCompleted a Masters degree in Health Services Research in 2012. Research focused on using network models to develop a clinical research agenda for neglected tropical diseases.

  • Michael Kozal

    Michael Kozal

    Senior Associate Dean for Veterans Affairs and Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    BioDr. Kozal was appointed Senior Associate Dean for Veteran Affairs at Stanford School of Medicine and Chief of Staff at VA Palo Alto Health Care System in 2021. Prior to coming to Stanford, he served as Associate Dean for Veteran Affairs at Yale University School of Medicine and the Chief of Staff at VA Connecticut Healthcare System.

    Dr. Kozal is a translational researcher who has focused his research career on three areas: 1) investigating the genetic determinants of HIV and HCV drug resistance, 2) the development of new molecular methods to detect viral mutations, and 3) HIV and HCV clinical trials involving new drugs and diagnostic technology. Dr. Kozal is an expert in microarray and deep sequencing technology receiving patents for his work in genotyping. Dr. Kozal previously directed the Yale HIV Clinical Trials Group and has more than 20 years of experience in running clinical trials, serving as the principal investigator or site investigator on >40 HIV and Hepatitis C trials. He has served on multiple VA and NIH/NCI review panels and is a current a member of the DHHS/NIH Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents.

  • Nathan Lo

    Nathan Lo

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research laboratory is interested in studying the transmission of infectious diseases and impact of public health interventions with an ultimate goal of informing public health policy. We study a diverse set of pathogens, both domestically and internationally, including vaccine-preventable infections (including COVID-19) and neglected parasitic diseases (such as schistosomiasis). Our group applies diverse computational methodologies, including tools from fields of epidemiology, mathematical and statistical modeling, simulation, and policy analysis.

    A large emphasis of our work is translating scientific evidence into public health policy. Our track record includes multiple studies that have changed policy in the fields of neglected parasitic diseases and COVID-19. We work closely with policy organizations like the World Health Organization and the California Department of Public Health. Nathan served as the lead writer of the World Health Organization guidelines on schistosomiasis (2022) and strongyloidiasis.

    Our current research focuses on the following areas:
    (1) Vaccine-preventable infectious diseases (including COVID-19) in the United States, with a focus on studying vaccines and transmission dynamics
    (2) Public health strategies for control and elimination of globally important neglected infectious diseases, such as helminths infections (schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis) and typhoid fever

    Hiring
    We are seeking to fill multiple research positions at all levels. Candidates interested in working on computational public health research related to infectious diseases with a strong quantitative background are highly encouraged to apply. If you an interested, please submit a cover letter, CV, and names of two references to Nathan.Lo@stanford.edu.

  • Stephen Luby

    Stephen Luby

    Lucy Becker Professor of Medicine, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Luby’s research interests include identifying and interrupting pathways of infectious disease transmission in low income countries.

  • Natalia Medvedeva

    Natalia Medvedeva

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr Natalia Medvedeva specializes in the treatment of infectious diseases. She has a special interest in antimicrobial stewardship and medical education.

  • Thomas Charles Merigan M.D.

    Thomas Charles Merigan M.D.

    George E. and Lucy Becker Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am now emeritus and only participate in university activities through advising my former trainees who have joined the faculty.

  • Joanna Nelson

    Joanna Nelson

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Nelson is a board certified Infectious Disease specialist. She specializes in the treatment of immunocompromised patients, including patients who have had solid organ or bone marrow transplantation or who have malignancy undergoing chemotherapy. She also has a special interest in caring for patients with Cystic fibrosis or who have had a lung transplant as well as Nontuberculous mycobacterial Infections.

  • Andrew Nevins

    Andrew Nevins

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical general infectious diseases. Medical education.

  • Julie Parsonnet

    Julie Parsonnet

    George DeForest Barnett Professor of Medicine and Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am an infectious diseases epidemiologist who has done large field studies in both the US and developing countries. We research the long-term consequences of chronic interactions between the human host and the microbial world. My lab has done fundamental work establishing the role of H. pylori in causing disease and understanding its epidemiology. Currently, our research dissects how and when children first encounter microbes and the long term effects of these exposures on health.

  • Benjamin Pinsky

    Benjamin Pinsky

    Professor of Pathology, of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDevelopment and application of molecular assays for the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases.

  • Orlando Quintero, MD

    Orlando Quintero, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Orlando Quintero is a board-certified, fellowship trained internist specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. He is also clinical assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    As a clinician, Dr. Quintero diagnoses and treats infectious diseases in immunocompromised patients. This includes the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of infections in patients who are immunosuppressed because of Solid Organ Transplantation, Bone Marrow (Hematopoeitic Cell) Transplants, Hematologic Malignancies, Chemotherapy for Solid Tumors, HIV who receive Chemotherapy, Solid Organ or Bone Marrow Transplants Immunomodulators for Auto-Immune Diseases and other forms of immunodeficiency.

    Dr. Quintero has published on topics including coronavirus in kidney transplant patients, prevention of cytomegalovirus in heart transplant patients, and prevention of urinary tract infections in renal transplant patients. His work has appeared in publications including Transplant Infectious Disease, Emerging Infectious Diseases, and the Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation.

    He has delivered presentations at meetings of organizations including the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation, Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, and American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Topics of his presentations have included prevention of cytomegalovirus, prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections, Chagas disease in New York City, and more.

    Currently, Dr. Quintero is conducting research on treatment of patients with COVID-19, prevention and treatment of invasive fungal infections of the gastrointestinal tract in immunocompromised patients, and the epidemiology of invasive fungal infections in heart transplant recipients.

    Among his awards, He has received honors for his teaching and research from Albert Einstein College. He also has earned recognition from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the American Society of Transplantation.

    Dr. Quintero’s volunteer community service includes participation in health fairs to promote HIV testing and hypertension control, plus disease management in the Garifuna population in New York – descendants of an Afro-indigenous population from the Caribbean island of St. Vincent.

    He is a member of the Infectious Disease Society of American, Infectious Diseases Association of California, American Society of Transplantation, and HIV Medicine Association.

  • David A. Relman

    David A. Relman

    Thomas C. and Joan M. Merigan Professor and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
    On Partial Leave from 04/29/2024 To 10/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy investigative program focuses on human-microbe interactions and human microbial ecology, and primarily concerns the ecology of human indigenous microbial communities; a secondary interest concerns the classification of humans with systemic infectious diseases, based on features of genome-wide gene transcript abundance patterns and pther aspects of the host response.

  • Cybele A. Renault, MD, DTM&H, FIDSA

    Cybele A. Renault, MD, DTM&H, FIDSA

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Renault has devoted her career to caring for vulnerable patient populations, both domestically and overseas. She completed her medical school and residency training at the University of Chicago, caring for underserved patients on Chicago's South Side, followed by a Chief Resident year at John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County, the public hospital serving the uninsured in Chicago. She began her career in global health as an Infectious Diseases fellow at Stanford, validating low-cost HIV diagnostics in Burkina Faso, and providing clinical service and teaching in India and Zimbabwe as a fellow, and later in Thailand, Uganda, Rwanda and Kenya as one of our Infectious Diseases faculty. Her clinical work is focused on caring for our veteran population, working to empower veterans to engage in their care, often in the setting of significant mental illness.

    Dr. Renault is most passionate about medical education and program development to combat global antimicrobial resistance through antimicrobial stewardship, to create opportunities for the Internal Medicine residents centering on caring for vulnerable patient populations, and to develop impactful and sustainable programs in collaboration with our low- and middle-income partners for our Center for Innovation in Global Health. She served as Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency Program for 4 years prior to transitioning to her current role as Program Lead for Global Health, for which she leads the Global Health Track for the Internal Medicine residency program and develops global health initiatives for the Department of Medicine. She co-founded and has been director of the Stanford 2-week intensive global health course since its inception in 2012, she has structured trainee and faculty rotations based on evolving needs of our partner sites in Uganda, Rwanda, Zimbabwe, and Sri Lanka, she is the faculty lead for the ID/antimicrobial stewardship partnership between Stanford and Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret, Kenya, and she is leading Stanford's Internal Medicine virtual case-based education initiative to support our newest medical school partner in Negele Arsi, Ethiopia.

    Dr. Renault strives to augment Stanford's contributions and support for underserved patient populations in the United States. She established resident rotations in Shiprock, New Mexico and Chinle, Arizona through the Indian Health Service, and she is Faculty Advisor for the Internal Medicine Health Equity, Advocacy and Research concentration in the residency program. She also aspires to improve resources for women physicians. In 2016, Dr. Renault established the GME Women in Medicine Leadership Council, with the intention of creating community and encouraging conversations about professional and personal life decisions as women in the field of medicine. She is passionate about mentoring through sharing personal experiences, creating an environment that encourages reflection, and building skills to address challenges unique to women in medicine.

    In 2022, in recognition of her passion for medical education and her success in program development, Dr. Renault was asked to join the leadership at Palo Alto Veterans Health Care System as Deputy Associate Chief of Staff for Education. In this role, she works with rotation directors to optimize their respective rotations to offer robust educational opportunities for trainees across specialties who are rotating at the Palo Alto VA.

  • Gary Schoolnik

    Gary Schoolnik

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStructure-function analysis of bacterial adhesion proteins and toxins; design and synthesis of synthetic antigens; immunobiology of human papillomaviruses

  • Jake Scott

    Jake Scott

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Jake Scott is a board-certified infectious diseases specialist. He provides general infectious diseases care in the inpatient and outpatient settings and his special interests include COVID-19, coccidiomycosis, multidrug-resistant organisms, HIV, and HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis. He works with patients from diverse backgrounds to provide compassionate, high-quality care aligned with their needs.

    Dr. Scott was born and raised in the Bay Area and was inspired to pursue a career in medicine after working as an HIV test counselor in San Francisco. He studied literature and creative writing in college and values the narrative aspect of medicine and the importance of drawing out the story behind the diagnosis.

    One of Dr. Scott’s passions is teaching. He regularly works with Stanford residents and students and has lectured on various infectious disease-related topics, such as COVID-19, fever of unknown origin, and the dangers of antibiotic overuse, especially as it contributes to the rising threat of multidrug-resistant infections. He is also committed to expanding awareness of infectious diseases outside of the hospital and university through public presentations in the community and media interviews.
    He is the medical director of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare in Pleasanton and is a member of the Infection Control Committee and the Stanford Vaccine Clinical Advisory Committee.

    In his spare time, Dr. Scott enjoys rock climbing, hiking, and spending time with his wife and two young children.

  • Robert W. Shafer

    Robert W. Shafer

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and, by courtesy, of Pathology
    On Leave from 05/01/2024 To 10/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy group’s research is on the mechanisms and consequences of virus evolution with a focus on HIV therapy and drug resistance. We maintain a public HIV drug resistance database (http://hivdb.stanford.edu) as a resource for HIV drug resistance surveillance, interpreting HIV drug resistance tests, and HIV drug development. Our paramount goal is to inform HIV treatment and prevention policies by identifying the main factors responsible for the emergence and spread of drug resistance.

  • Upinder Singh

    Upinder Singh

    Stanford Medicine Professor of Infectious Disease and Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab elucidates the molecular basis of pathogenesis of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We use genetic and genomic approaches to identify novel virulence determinants and to characterize the global epidemiology of the parasite.

  • David A. Stevens

    David A. Stevens

    Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsImmunology and chemotherapy of human fungal diseases, particularly coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) in California and aspergillosis, and the parasitic disease, trypanosomiasis.

  • Ashley Styczynski

    Ashley Styczynski

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioAshley Styczynski, MD, MPH, is an Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases & Geographic Medicine and Global Health Faculty Fellow, and a Medical Officer in the International Infection and Control Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Styczynski's research interests are in infectious disease epidemiology, global health, emerging infections, and antimicrobial resistance. She holds an MPH from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and an MD from University of Illinois at Chicago. Prior to coming to Stanford for her infectious disease fellowship, she spent two years as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) Officer at the CDC. During her time as an EIS officer, Dr. Styczynski conducted outbreak investigations on Zika virus, vaccinia virus, and rabies. She is currently conducting research on antimicrobial resistance and interventions to reduce nosocomial infections within low-resource healthcare facilities.

  • Aruna Subramanian

    Aruna Subramanian

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research and scholarly interests have focused on tailoring antimicrobial prophylaxis in specific highly immunocompromised hosts depending on their specific infectious disease risks. I am interested in developing diagnostic algorithms and treatment protocols that will improve the quality of care in transplant and oncology patients.

    I also have an interest in training ID fellows in this very specialized area of patient care. To that end, we have started a new ICHS ID fellowship with a specialized curriculum and are developing supplemental educational materials to enhance this training, which can be implemented at other academic training centers.

  • Lucy Tompkins

    Lucy Tompkins

    Lucy Becker Professor of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenetic and cellular basis of pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori. Molecular epidemiology, hospital epidemiology, quality improvement in healthcare associated infections.

  • Elena Vendrame

    Elena Vendrame

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on understanding the host-pathogen interactions. In particular I study the interaction between natural killer cells and HIV.

  • Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD, MSCI

    Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD, MSCI

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLaboratory of Mechanisms in Human Immunity and Disease Pathogenesis

    Antibodies are a critical component of host defense. While the importance of humoral immunity has been recognized for decades, substantial gaps in knowledge remain around how antibodies function, and how their function is regulated, in vivo. Our laboratory performs studies designed to fill in these gaps, with the goal of enabling new vaccine and therapeutic strategies to prevent human disease. My interest in this area culminated from training in medicine, RNA virus biology (PhD), and molecular antibody biology (postdoctoral training). The intersection of these topics, viral immunity and disease pathogenesis, is the focus of our work. The essential question driving our research is why a small subset of people develop severe or fatal disease during viral infection while most infections result in a subclinical or mild outcome, even in at-risk populations. Our hypothesis is that the antibody signaling pathways that are engaged during viral infection through Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs) are a key driver of these distinct outcomes. We are focused on several major unknowns to address this hypothesis: How are antibody effector functions regulated in vivo and does this change in disease? How do distinct signaling pathways engaged by IgG immune complex-FcγR interactions impact host cell genetic regulation and the ultimate inflammatory/immune response? What are the tissue-specific functions that antibodies engage? How does the heterogeneity in post-translational modifications (PTMs) of human antibodies contribute to heterogeneity in viral immunity?



    Current clinical studies:
    Recruiting:

    An Open Label Study of IgG Fc Glycan Composition in Human Immunity
    Principal Investigator: Taia T. Wang, MD, PhD
    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
    NCT01967238

  • Andrew Zolopa

    Andrew Zolopa

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Zolopa’s research applies a variety of clinical epidemiologic methods in an effort to optimize antiretroviral therapy and understand the impact of drug resistance on response to ARV. Areas of focus include the clinical application of resistance testing in optimizing antiretroviral therapy, clinical cohorts, trials of antiretroviral therapies and population-based epidemiologic evaluation of HIV resistance and efficacy of ARV therapy. More recently studies focused on premature aging in HIV.