School of Medicine


Showing 21-30 of 8,572 Results

  • Pieter van der Starre

    Pieter van der Starre

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiovascular Pharmacology, Cardiovascular Physiology,
    Neurophysiology and Monitoring,
    Transesophageal Echocardiography

  • Frank Hanley

    Frank Hanley

    Lawrence Crowley, M.D., Endowed Professor in Child Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHis research and clinical work focuses on the development of interventional techniques for fetal and neonatal treatment of congenital heart disease, pulmonary, vascular physiology, and the neurologic impact of open-heart surgery. He developed and pioneered the “unifocalization” procedure, in which a single procedure is used to repair a complex and life-threatening congenital heart defect rather than several staged open-heart surgeries as performed by other surgeons.

  • Stephan Busque

    Stephan Busque

    Professor of Surgery (Abdominal Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interest is focused on the improvement of clinical immunosuppression. I am involved in the evaluation of new immunosuppressive drugs, potentially more efficacious or less toxic. My ultimate goal is to achieve tolerance, a state that would obviate the need for any drugs. I am an investigator part of a multidisciplinary tolerance induction project using total lymphoid irradiation and donor hematopoietic stem cells infusion after living donor kidney transplantation.

  • Henry J. Lowe, MD

    Henry J. Lowe, MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research in the field of biomedical informatics over the past 30 years has focused on the development of novel uses of information technology and computer science to improve human health. My current interests include the Electronic Health Record (EHR), biomedical knowledge representation, Internet applications in healthcare, clinical data warehouses, clinical data and text mining, academic social networking and the use of information technology to support clinical and translational research.

  • Robert Lowsky, MD

    Robert Lowsky, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Lowsky's research is focused on understanding the role of regulatory T cells in the prevention of GVHD and in promoting immune tolerance following organ transplantation.

  • Merritt Maduke

    Merritt Maduke

    Associate Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms of chloride channels & transporters studied by integration of structural and electrophysiological methods.

  • Miriam B. Goodman

    Miriam B. Goodman

    Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the molecular events that give rise to the sensation of touch and temperature in C. elegans. To do this, we use a combination of quantitative behavioral analysis, genetics, in vivo electrophysiology, and heterologous expression of ion channels. We also collaborate with Pruitt's group in Mechanical Engineering to develop and fabricate novel devices for the study of sensory transduction.

  • Christopher Sharp, MD

    Christopher Sharp, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Informatics
    Clinical Education
    Teaching Physical Examination
    Quality Improvement
    Preventive Medicine

  • Gregory Gilbert, MD

    Gregory Gilbert, MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEducation and Pre-hospital Care

  • Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Richard J. Reimer, MD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Molecular and Cellular Physiology at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsReimer Lab interests

    A primary interest of our lab is to understand how nerve cells make and recycle neurotransmitters, the small molecules that they use to communicate with each other. In better defining these processes we hope to achieve our long-term goal of identifying novel sites for treatment of diseases such as epilepsy and Parkinson Disease. In our studies on neurotransmitter metabolism we have focused our efforts on transporters, a functional class of proteins that move neurotransmitters and other small molecules across membranes in cells. Transporters have many characteristics that make them excellent pharmacological targets, and not surprisingly some of the most effective treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders are directed at transporters. We are specifically focusing on two groups of transporters – vesicular neurotransmitter transporters that package neurotransmitters into vesicles for release, and glutamine transporters that shuttle glutamine, a precursor for two major neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA, to neurons from glia, the supporting cells that surround them. We are pursuing these goals through molecular and biochemical studies, and, in collaboration with the Huguenard and Prince labs, through physiological and biosensor based imaging studies to better understand how pharmacological targeting of these molecules will influence neurological disorders.

    A second interest of our lab is to define mechanism underlying the pathology of lysosomal storage disorders. Lysosomes are membrane bound acidic intracellular organelles filled with hydrolytic enzymes that normally function as recycling centers within cells by breaking down damaged cellular macromolecules. Several degenerative diseases designated as lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are associated with the accumulation of material within lysosomes. Tay-Sachs disease, Neimann-Pick disease and Gaucher disease are some of the more common LSDs. For reasons that remain incompletely understood, these diseases often affect the nervous system out of proportion to other organs. As a model for LSDs we are studying the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders. These diseases are the result of a defect in transport of sialic acid across lysosomal membranes and are associated with mutations in the gene encoding the sialic acid transporter sialin. We are using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches to better define the normal function of sialin and to determine how loss of sialin function leads to neurodevelopmental defects and neurodegeneration associated with the lysosomal free sialic acid storage disorders.