School of Medicine


Showing 101-129 of 129 Results

  • Calvin Santiago

    Calvin Santiago

    Clinical Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Santiago is Board-certified as a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada, specializing in Neurology. He completed his Adult Neurology residency at the University of Toronto and is now a Clinical Instructor in the Division of Comprehensive Neurology at Stanford University. He provides comprehensive neurological care to patients with a broad range of neurological conditions. His academic interests focus on improving access to neurological care, such as reducing wait times and stream-lining referrals so that patients are directed to the most appropriate care provider.

  • Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Neil Schwartz, MD, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical interests involve inpatient and outpatient care of patients with neurovascular diseases, mostly ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. I have a particular interest in cervical artery dissection, non-atherosclerotic vasculopathies, and stroke in the young.

  • Sharon Sha, MD, MS

    Sharon Sha, MD, MS

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Sha is a Clinical Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University where she serves as Chief for the Memory Disorders Division and the Stanford Memory Disorders Center, Associate Vice Chair of Clinical Research, Director of the Huntington’s Disease Center of Excellence and Ataxia Clinic, Co-Director of the Lewy Body Disease Association Research Center of Excellence, Clinical Core Co-Leader of the Stanford Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, and Director of the Behavioral Neurology Fellowship. Her clinical time is devoted to caring for patients with Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders and her research is devoted to finding treatments for these cognitive disorders. She also served on the California Governor’s Alzheimer’s Prevention and Preparedness Task Force Chaired by Maria Shriver in 2020. She has been featured in international media and documentaries such as the BBC "How to Stay Young" and the Docuseries "Limitless with Chris Hemsworth".

  • Irina Skylar-Scott

    Irina Skylar-Scott

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Skylar-Scott is a board-certified, fellowship-trained cognitive and behavioral neurologist and clinical assistant professor at Stanford University. She is a Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology as well as the United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties in Behavioral Neurology and Neuropsychiatry.

    Her clinical interests include the treatment of cognitive and behavioral impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body dementia, posterior cortical atrophy, primary progressive aphasia, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, primary age-related tauopathy, and limbic-predominant age-associated TDP-43 encephalopathy, among other disorders of cognition and behavior.

    Her research interests include clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease and how social and intellectual engagement can affect cognition. She has also investigated impaired consciousness in epilepsy and biomarkers for assessing Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Prior to joining Stanford, Dr. Skylar-Scott was a fellow in the Center for Alzheimer’s Research and Treatment (CART) in the Department of Neurology at Harvard Medical School/Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She also completed her undergraduate degree at MIT, her MD at Yale, and her residency at Harvard.

    Dr. Skylar-Scott’s work has appeared in Neurology, Alzheimer's Research and Therapy, Pediatric Neurology, the Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine, Muscle & Nerve, and Epilepsia. She also has also been invited to write book chapters on Alzheimer’s disease, normal pressure hydrocephalus, Parkinson’s disease dementia and Lewy body dementia, and the cognitive and psychiatric consequences of neuroimmunological disorders published by Elsevier and McGraw-Hill.

    Presentations by Dr. Skylar-Scott have focused on prevention of cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people, cognitive and neuropsychiatric manifestations of Parkinson’s disease, human prion diseases, and other topics. She has presented at meetings held by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the American Neurological Association (ANA), and the American Academy of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM).

    For her research and scholarship, Dr. Skylar-Scott has earned honors from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). She was honored to receive the Golseth Young Investigator Award from the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine. In addition, she won the Action Duchenne International Conference First Prize Poster for her research in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Dr. Skylar-Scott is a member of the American Neurological Association and American Academy of Neurology. Every year, she walks to raise money for Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia.

  • Yuen So, MD, PhD

    Yuen So, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology)
    On Partial Leave from 02/01/2024 To 08/18/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of peripheral neuropathy, myasthenia gravis, motor neuron diseases including ALS and SMA, nerve injuries and muscle diseases. Application of clinical neurophysiological methods to neurological diagnosis. Development of evidence-based medicine pertaining to the practice of neurology.

  • Kristen K. Steenerson, MD

    Kristen K. Steenerson, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Otolaryngology (Head and Neck Surgery)
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioKristen Steenerson is a board-certified neurologist with fellowship training in otoneurology. After graduating cum laude from Claremont McKenna College where she was honored as an All-American lacrosse defensive player, she continued on to medical school at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah. After four years of excellent training and annual ski passes, she proceeded to the Mayo Clinic in Arizona for neurology residency. There, she discovered the beauty of the Sonoran Desert as well as an unmet need in balance disorders and vertigo, motivating her to pursue a fellowship in otoneurology at Barrow Neurological Institute. She joins Stanford with positions in both Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery and Neurology with the goal of jointly addressing the junction of inner ear and brain disorders. Her specific interests include vestibular migraine, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Ménière's disease and international neurology.

  • Ryan Taylor, MD

    Ryan Taylor, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Taylor is a fellowship-trained neurologist and assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Memory Disorders Division. He provides patient care at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.

    His areas of expertise include diagnosing and treating illnesses that impair thinking, memory, behavior, and speech. Dr. Taylor’s clinical focus includes Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy body disease, frontotemporal dementia, primary progressive aphasia, posterior cortical atrophy, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, autoimmune encephalitis and other rapidly progressive dementias. He works with patients and families to provide diagnostic clarity and individualized treatment plans.

    Dr. Taylor’s academic and research interests combine clinical and scientific understandings of dementia with a philosophical inquiry into the structure of conscious experience. His original clinical research includes diverse topics, such as advances in diagnosing Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and the clinical characterization of adult-onset hereditary dementias. Dr. Taylor has published work instrumental in identifying the potential role of fentanyl in a syndrome of sudden onset amnesia that emerged during the opioid crisis.

    He has presented research at the American Academy of Neurology and published in peer-reviewed journals, including the Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences and Methods in Molecular Biology. He has also published a chapter on the diagnosis and treatment of frontotemporal dementia and was a reviewer for Neurocase.

    Dr. Taylor is a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada. He has taught residents and medical students clinical skills, neuroanatomy, neuro-imaging, and other subjects. He also has delivered Grand Rounds presentations on dementia, epilepsy, and pediatric neurology.

  • Kate Therkelsen, MD

    Kate Therkelsen, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Therkelsen is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neuro-oncologist with the Stanford Medicine Cancer Center and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences.

    She diagnoses and treats a wide range of conditions including primary brain tumors and cancers of the central nervous system, metastatic disease to the brain and spinal cord, and neurologic complications of cancer. She prepares a personalized, comprehensive care plan for each patient she serves.

    Dr. Therkelsen’s research interests include clinical trials of new therapeutics, as well as ways to reduce toxicities that some patients may experience when receiving cancer treatment. Her fellowship research projects included a study of survival and long-term function among patients treated for primary central nervous system lymphoma. She also received a pre-doctoral National Institutes of Health Intramural Research Training Award for her work with the Framingham Heart Study.

    She has published in Current Treatment Options in Oncology and other peer-reviewed journals. She has presented to her peers at international, national, and regional meetings, including the annual meetings of the Society of Neuro-Oncology and of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Dr. Therkelsen is a member of the Society of Neuro-Oncology and the American Academy of Neurology.

  • Reena Thomas, MD PhD

    Reena Thomas, MD PhD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests-Neuro Oncology Immunotherapy
    -Health Equity
    -Medical Education

  • Zachary David Threlkeld

    Zachary David Threlkeld

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    BioDr. Threlkeld cares for critically ill patients with acute neurologic illness, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and epilepsy. He completed his residency training in neurology at the University of California, San Francisco, and joined the Stanford Neurocritical Care program after completing fellowship training in neurocritical care at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He has a particular clinical and research interest in traumatic brain injury. His research uses advanced imaging modalities like functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to better understand disorders of consciousness.

  • Alexandra Nicole Trelle

    Alexandra Nicole Trelle

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioI completed my undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto, and my PhD at the University of Cambridge. My work explores the neural mechanisms supporting episodic memory, and how these are affected by aging and Alzheimer's disease. I am currently leading the Stanford Aging and Memory Study, a large-scale longitudinal project examining individual differences in episodic memory in older adults. My research combines structural and functional MRI, PET imaging, and analysis of molecular and genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

  • Chitra Venkatasubramanian, MBBS, MD, MSc, FNCS

    Chitra Venkatasubramanian, MBBS, MD, MSc, FNCS

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in the study of the radiological characteristics and temporal profile of edema/ tissue injury in the perihematomal area around spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. I am also interested in developing protocols for emergent reversal of anticoagulation in a life-threatening hemorrhage situation.

  • Nirali Vora

    Nirali Vora

    Clinical Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Nirali Vora is a Clinical Professor of Neurology and Neurological sciences at Stanford University. She is board certified in Adult Neurology and Vascular Neurology after completing her residency and advanced fellowship training at Stanford. She provides comprehensive care for all stroke patients, as well as hospitalized adults with acute or undiagnosed neurological conditions. She specializes in treating vascular disorders including TIA, vasculitis, dissection, venous thrombosis, and undetermined or “cryptogenic” causes of stroke.

    Dr. Vora directs the Stanford Global Health Neurology program, through which she collaborated to start the first stroke unit in Zimbabwe and gained experience in HIV neurology and other neuro-infectious diseases. Additional research interests include stroke prevention, TIA triage, eliminating disparities in health care, and neurology education. She is also the Director of the Stanford Adult Neurology Residency Program.

  • Jessica Falco-Walter

    Jessica Falco-Walter

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioJessica Falco-Walter, MD is board certified in Neurology as well as in Epilepsy and Clinical Neurophysiology and practices as a Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurology & Neurological Sciences at Stanford University. Dr. Walter received her BA in Cognitive Science with distinction from Yale University. She received her MD and completed her internship at Georgetown University School of Medicine and then completed her neurology residency at the Mount Sinai Medical Center of the Icahn School of Medicine. She then went on to pursue fellowship in Clinical Neurophysiology and Epilepsy at Rush University Medical Center, in Chicago, IL. She is board certified by the ABPN in Neurology, Clinical Neurophysiology, and Epilepsy. She was one of the first ABPN Epilepsy fellows in the country. Her clinical focus is diagnosis and treatment of seizure disorders and epilepsy, with commitment to treating complex patients and improving quality of life as well as seizure control.

    She has a particular interest in dietary treatments for epilepsy and has created a clinic to better manage ketogenic diet treatments for adults with epilepsy. She has published research on ketogenic dietary treatments and continues to work on research related to Vitamin D and epilepsy. While she has particular interest in dietary treatments in epilepsy she is well versed in all currently available medications and surgical treatments for epilepsy and works with patients to treat epilepsy medically, surgically, and wholistically. She is involved in research on new treatments for epilepsy as well.

    Dr. Falco-Walter is the Students Interested in Neurology (SIGN) faculty lead for the Department of Neurology and really enjoys working with undergraduates and medical students at the beginning of their careers. She is the course instructor for the Introduction to Neurology Seminar that runs in the fall for medical students that introduces students to all the subspecialty areas within Neurology.

  • Jack Tzu-Chieh Wang, MD, PhD

    Jack Tzu-Chieh Wang, MD, PhD

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur primary research focus is understanding the molecular mechanisms of axonal degeneration and subsequent failure of axonal regeneration in the CNS. We have identified critical cellular pathways mediating axonal degeneration following acute neurological injuries including ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury. Modulating these pathways presents a novel therapeutic strategy to protect vulnerable nerve fibers and enhance functional recovery in a multitude of acute CNS injuries and diseases.

  • Edward N. Wilson

    Edward N. Wilson

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSingle-cell transcriptomic profiling of immune cells in Alzheimer's disease brain

    Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis biomarkers

    Alzheimer’s disease experimental therapeutics

  • Kyan Younes, MD

    Kyan Younes, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Younes is a fellowship-trained, board-certified neurologist and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    His areas of expertise include the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, primary progressive aphasia, Lewy body dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus and cognitive and behavioral impairments. For each patient, Dr. Younes develops a personalized plan of care. A plan may include his close collaboration with experts from psychiatry, nursing, pharmacy, genetic counseling, and other specialties. His goal is to ensure that each patient receives care that is both comprehensive and compassionate.

    To help lead advances and innovations in his field, Dr. Younes conducts extensive research. He is studying the clinical, neuropsychological, socioemotional, genetic, and pathological features when a patient experiences degeneration of the right anterior temporal lobe area of the brain. This disorder can affect a person’s ability to process emotions and person-specific knowledge.

    He also is researching how multimodal brain imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) combined with machine learning can help improve the detection of neurodegenerative diseases. In other research, he has participated in clinical trials of new drug therapies for Alzheimer’s disease.

    Dr. Younes has presented research findings at meetings of the American Neurological Association, American Academy of Neurology, and American Psychiatric Association. Topics have included predictors of cognitive performance in dementia.

    He has co-authored research articles published in the American Journal of Psychiatry, Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, Journal of Neuroimaging, and elsewhere. Subjects of these articles have included guidelines for diagnosing the effects of right anterior temporal lobe degeneration on behavior, treatment for symptoms of encephalitis, and the impact of mild traumatic brain injury on healthy older adults.

    Dr. Younes has written chapters on frontotemporal dementia for Psychiatric Clinics as well as the epilepsy, coma, acute ischemic stroke, meningitis and encephalitis chapters for the textbook The Little Black Book of Neurology.

    He is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, American Neurological Association, Alzheimer’s Association, and International Society for Frontotemporal Dementias.

  • Christina Young

    Christina Young

    Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Christina Young obtained her PhD in Clinical Psychology as well as her MS in Statistics at Northwestern University. She completed her predoctoral internship at the University of Illinois Chicago where she specialized in neuropsychology. She continued her neuropsychology training as well as her research during her postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University.

    Dr. Young's research focuses on identifying real-world declines in cognition that track with the pathological changes in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related dementias. Her work incorporates novel measures of cognition as well as neuroimaging to improve the detection and monitoring of early cognitive decline in the context of AD and related dementias. She has been awarded grant funding through a K99/R00 from the NIH and an Alzheimer's Association Research Fellowship to Promote Diversity (AARF-D) from the Alzheimer's Association.

  • Hengameh Zahed, MD, PhD

    Hengameh Zahed, MD, PhD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Zahed is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist with the Stanford Medicine Movement Disorders Center. She is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences.

    She diagnoses and treats a wide range of movement disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, essential tremor, dystonia, and ataxia. She creates a personalized treatment plan for each of her patients using a variety of treatment options, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological options, deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment for Parkinson's disease and tremors, and botulinum toxin injections for movement disorders and spasticity.

    Prior to joining Stanford University, Dr. Zahed completed a neurology residency and fellowship in movement disorders at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where she also earned her MD and PhD in biomedical sciences. Dr. Zahed’s research interests include understanding the genetic and electrophysiological underpinnings of movement disorders and investigating applications of wearable technologies to monitor symptoms and improve the quality of life in patients with movement disorders. She also participates in clinical trials of new therapeutics for Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders.

    Dr. Zahed has published in Movement Disorders, Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine, The Journal of Clinical Investigation, American Journal of Human Genetics, Cell, and other peer-reviewed journals. She has presented to her peers at international, national, and regional meetings. These meetings have included the International Congress of Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders, the Hereditary Disease Foundation Symposium, the World Society for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, and the Society for Neuroscience.

    Dr. Zahed is a member of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society.

  • Fanglin Zhang, MD., PhD.

    Fanglin Zhang, MD., PhD.

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Zhang is a board-certified, fellowship-trained neurologist. She serves as a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Zhang diligently excels in diagnosing and treating complex neurological conditions. Her clinical interests span a broad spectrum, with a current emphasis on intractable epilepsy and urgent stroke care. With each patient, Dr. Zhang forms a strong alliance focused on overcoming neurological disease and improving quality of life. She practices a patient-centered and evidence-based medicine.

    As a clinician educator, she finds joy in educating both patients and trainees. She also enjoys conducting cutting-edge clinical research. Her work has been published in numerous peer-reviewed journals, such as Neurological Sciences, Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, Neuroimage, Glia, Immunology, the Journal of Psychiatric Practice, Journal of Neuroimmunology, etc. Her current research interest includes clinical trials and a large cohort study of the impact of seizures on stroke outcomes.

    Among her many honors, Dr. Zhang has won a grant award from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Dr. Zhang shows a great enthusiasm in public welfare. She has earned recognition for volunteering her time and expertise at family health centers, hospitals, and schools.

  • Niushen Zhang

    Niushen Zhang

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    BioDr. Niushen Zhang is a board-certified neurologist and Chief of the Headache and Facial Pain Division in the Department of Neurology. She has a special interest in developing personalized treatment plans for headache patients which incorporate the use of complementary and integrative medicine. She is the Chair of the Complementary and Integrative Medicine Special Interest Section of the American Headache Society (AHS). Her research interests include the connection between the gut microbiome and migraine and the impact of diet and nutrition on migraine. In addition, she participates in clinical trials of new headache treatments for migraine and cluster headache. Dr. Zhang is also actively involved in medical education. She is the Director of the Headache Fellowship Program at Stanford. She serves as the Co-Chair of the Headache Fellowship Directors Committee for the American Headache Society (AHS). She is also a curriculum developer for AHS's REACH Program. She spearheaded the design and creation of the AHS National Headache Fellowship Opportunities website which serves as a central resource for all headache fellowship applicants and promotes the AAN's unified fellowship application timeline.

    Dr. Zhang graduated from Yale University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology. She earned an MD from the New York University School of Medicine. She completed neurology residency and fellowship in headache and facial pain at Stanford University.