School of Medicine


Showing 61-80 of 88 Results

  • Dhriti Nagar

    Dhriti Nagar

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    BioPremature birth is a leading cause of developmental and neuropsychiatric disorders in children. One of the factors causing these defects is lowered levels of available oxygen (hypoxia) in the newborn due to immature lungs. My research focuses on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxia-induced developmental disorders of the nervous system due to preterm birth.

  • Michitaka Nakano

    Michitaka Nakano

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Hematology

    BioI am a MD/PhD postdoctoral fellow and medical oncologist with a long-standing interest in translational cancer research. My long-term goal is to be a lab-based physician-scientist and independent academic researcher, translating basic cancer research, and mentoring next-generation scientists. My thesis work in Japan focused on cancer stem cell equilibrium by uniquely applying organoid culture as a method to elucidate cancer stem cell dynamics, which was awarded in Japanese Cancer Association. Along with the development of the field represented by success in T cell checkpoint, my interest gradually shifted to immune oncology while I examined numerous numbers of cancer patients as a medical oncology fellow. My postdoctoral fellowship at Calvin Kuo Lab in Stanford (2019-present) focuses on tumor immune microenvironment. Kuo lab developed a unique 3D air-liquid interface (ALI) organoid system that cultures tumors while preserving their endogenous infiltrating immune cells (T,B ,NK, Myeloid cells). My postdoctoral work will prove the significance of organoids as a translational tool to discover tumor-immune interaction by novel checkpoint inhibitors for immune cells, which can be broadly applicable to basic cancer biology, precision medicine, therapeutics validation and biomarker discovery.

  • Kerem Nernekli

    Kerem Nernekli

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Radiology

    BioDr. Nernekli has a wide-ranging research background encompassing molecular imaging, surgical neuroanatomy, clinical outcome studies, and machine learning, focusing on medical image reconstruction and multimodal deep learning algorithms for classification and segmentation tasks. Currently, he is focused on investigating novel radiotracer and activatable Gd-based contrast agents to detect senescence in large animal models with PET/MRI. Furthermore, Dr. Nernekli is exploring the potential of ferumoxytol-MRI and two-photon microscopy to correlate theranostic nanoparticles in their natural environment in order to gain a deeper understanding of their interactions with tumor-associated microenvironments.

  • Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Kathleen M. Sakamoto

    Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the molecular pathways that regulate normal and aberrant blood cell development, including acute leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. We are also studying novel drugs for treatment of cancer.

  • Peter L. Santa Maria, MBBS, PhD

    Peter L. Santa Maria, MBBS, PhD

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering
    On Partial Leave from 08/01/2023 To 07/14/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study chronic suppurative otitis media, a chronic biofilm infection of the middle ear predominantly involving pseudomonas and staph aureus. We are investigating mechanisms of sensory hearing loss, host microbe interactions and trialling novel therapeutics.

    Our work in tympanic membrane regeneration has entered clinical trials.

    Novel treatments for wound healing in intra oral wounds with potential applications to prevent post tonsillectomy wound healing and oral mucositis.

  • Birgitt Schuele

    Birgitt Schuele

    Associate Professor (Research) of Pathology

    BioBirgitt Schüle, MD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pathology at Stanford University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on medical genetics and stem cell modeling to uncover disease mechanisms and pathways involved in neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease and related disorders. She is dedicated to developing novel therapeutic strategies that contribute to the advancement of precision medicine.
    Dr. Schüle obtained her medical training from the Georg-August University Göttingen and Medical University Lübeck, Germany, between 1993 and 2001. She earned her doctoral degree in medicine (Dr. med.) in neurophysiology from the Georg-August University Göttingen in 2001. During her neurology internship from 2001 to 2002 at the Medical University of Lübeck under the guidance of Prof. Christine Klein. Subsequently, she pursued a postdoctoral fellowship in human genetics with Prof. Uta Francke at Stanford University School of Medicine from 2003 to 2005.
    From 2005 to 2019, Dr. Schüle demonstrated leadership in spearheading critical clinical research programs and establishing essential biospecimen repositories for neurogenetics, translational stem cell research, and brain donation at the Parkinson's Institute and Clinical Center.
    Currently, Dr. Schüle serves as the Associate Core Leader, Neuropathology, within the Stanford Alzheimer Research Center (ADRC). Her contributions to ADRC include genetic characterization, biobanking, and the establishment of a human induced pluripotent stem cell and post-mortem leptomeninges tissue bank. These resources are shared with the data and tissue repositories at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), facilitating collaborative research and advancing our understanding of neurodegenerative diseases.
    Dr. Schüle's expertise and dedication in the field of neurodegeneration contribute significantly to the advancement of medical knowledge. She is recognized as a respected member of the scientific community, playing an important role in the pursuit of effective treatments and precision medicine approaches.

  • Sean Paul Spencer, MD,PhD

    Sean Paul Spencer, MD,PhD

    Instructor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioSean Spencer, MD,PhD is a Gastroenterologist and Physician Scientist at Stanford University working with Justin Sonennburg,PhD to uncover the role of dietary intake on the gut microbiome and mucosal immune system. Sean obtained his medical degree University of Pennsylvania, earning his PhD studying nutritional immunology with Yasmine Belkaid,PhD at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), after which he moved to Boston for residency training at Massachusetts General Hospital and completed his Gastroenterology training at Stanford University. Sean’s career goal is to study mechanisms by which dietary intake influences our microbiome and immune system to better understand and treat gastrointestinal disease.

  • Yonatan Winetraub

    Yonatan Winetraub

    Instructor, Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests span non-invasive imaging for early cancer diagnosis and space exploration.
    I'm focusing on utilizing Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and machine learning to create virtual histology tools to image cancer non invasively at a single cell resolution, allowing physicians to skip biopsy (read more about the research). Prior to my PhD at Stanford, I co-founded SpaceIL, a non-profit organization that launched the first private interplanetary robotic mission to the Moon launched 2019.

  • Jinglong Wang

    Jinglong Wang

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Radiation Biology

    BioDr. Wang was trained at the Jacques Monod Institute and École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France under the mentorship of Dr. Terence Strick. and obtained his Ph.D. degree from the University of Paris in 2019. He dissected the molecular machinery of human and bacterial NHEJ, and interrogated the mechanism of SpCas9 tolerance to non-specific substrate using single-molecule nanomanipulation tools.
    Jinglong’s research in the Frock Lab focuses on DSB-related chromosome topological changes and genomic interactions.

  • Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Albert Y. Wu, MD, PhD, FACS

    Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy translational research focuses on using autologous stem cells to recreate a patient’s ocular tissues for potential transplantation. We are generating tissue from induced pluripotent stem cells to treat limbal stem cell deficiency in patients who are bilaterally blind. By applying my background in molecular and cellular biology, stem cell biology, oculoplastic surgery, I hope to make regenerative medicine a reality for those suffering from orbital and ocular disease.