Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability


Showing 101-150 of 184 Results

  • David Lobell

    David Lobell

    Benjamin M. Page Professor, William Wrigley Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute, at the Woods Institute for the Environment and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the interactions between food production, food security, and the environment using a range of modern tools.

  • Laura Mansfield

    Laura Mansfield

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioI am interested in how machine learning and Bayesian statistics can assist our understanding and prediction of the climate and weather. My current research focuses on improving gravity wave parameterizations in atmospheric circulation models, which are necessary to capture the subgrid-scale gravity waves that influence the middle atmosphere dynamics. Machine learning can be used to either improve existing physics-based parameterizations, i.e. through calibration, or to replace these entirely with novel machine learning alternatives. I work on both of these approaches and am particularly interested in exploring uncertainties arising from parameterizations.

    Previously, I completed my PhD at the University of Reading, which focused on emulating climate models to estimate the surface temperature response to changes in anthropogenic forcings, including both long-lived greenhouse gases and short-lived aerosol pollutants. Prior to this, I completed the Mathematics of Planet Earth MRes at University of Reading, after coming from an undergraduate degree in Physics at Imperial College London. Outside of work, my interests include cycling, running and being outdoors in California.

  • Pamela Matson

    Pamela Matson

    Richard and Rhoda Goldman Professor of Environmental Studies and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute, Emerita

    BioPAMELA MATSON is an interdisciplinary sustainability scientist, academic leader, and organizational strategist. She served as dean of Stanford University’s School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences from 2002-2017, building interdisciplinary departments and educational programs focused on resources, environment and sustainability, as well as co-leading university-wide interdisciplinary initiatives. In her current role as the Goldman Professor of Environmental Studies and Senior Fellow in the Woods Institute for the Environment, she leads the graduate program on Sustainability Science and Practice. Her research addresses a range of environment and sustainability issues, including sustainability of agricultural systems, vulnerability and resilience of particular people and places to climate change, and characteristics of science that can contribute to sustainability transitions at scale.

    Dr. Matson serves as chair of the board of the World Wildlife Fund-US and as a board member of the World Wildlife Fund-International and several university advisory boards. She served on the US National Academy of Science Board on Sustainable Development and co-wrote the National Research Council’s volume Our Common Journey: A transition toward sustainability (1999); she also led the NRC committee on America’s Climate Choices: Advancing the Science of Climate Change. She was the founding chair of the National Academies Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability, and founding editor for the Annual Review of Environment and Resources. She is a past President of the Ecological Society of America. Her recent publications (among around 200) include Seeds of Sustainability: Lessons from the Birthplace of the Green Revolution (2012) and Pursuing Sustainability (2016).

    Pam is an elected member of the National Academy of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a AAAS Fellow. She received a MacArthur Foundation Award, contributed to the award of the Nobel Prize to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, among other awards and recognitions, and is an Einstein Fellow of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

    Dr. Matson holds a Bachelor of Science degree with double majors in Biology and Literature from the University of Wisconsin (Eau Claire), a Master degree in Environmental Science and Policy from Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs, a Doctorate in Forest Ecology from Oregon State University, and honorary doctorates from Princeton, McGill and Arizona State Universities. She spent ten years as a research scientist with NASA-Ames Research Center before moving to a professorship at the University of California Berkeley and, in 1997, to Stanford University.

  • Anna M. Michalak

    Anna M. Michalak

    Professor (By Courtesy), Earth System Science

    BioDr. Anna M. Michalak is the Director of the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution for Science. She also holds appointments as Professor (by courtesy) in the Department of Earth System Science and the Department of Biology at Stanford University. Prior to joining Carnegie, she was the Frank and Brooke Transue Faculty Scholar and Associate Professor at the University of Michigan. She holds a Ph.D. and M.S. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Stanford University, and a B.Sc.(Eng.) in Environmental Engineering from the University of Guelph, Canada.

    Dr. Michalak studies the cycling and emissions of greenhouse gases at the Earth surface at urban to global scales – scales directly relevant to informing climate and policy – primarily through the use of atmospheric observations that provide the clearest constraints at these critical scales. She also explores climate change impacts on freshwater and coastal water quality via influences on nutrient delivery to, and on conditions within, water bodies. Her approach is highly data-driven, with a common methodological thread being the development and application of spatiotemporal statistical data fusion methods for optimizing the use of limited in situ and remote sensing environmental data.

    She is the lead author of the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan, a former Editor of the journal Water Resources Research, and Chair of the scientific advisory board for the European Integrated Carbon Observation System. She is the recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (nominated by NASA), the NSF CAREER award, the Leopold Fellowship in environmental leadership, and the American Geophysical Union’s Simpson Medal.

  • Diana Moanga

    Diana Moanga

    Lecturer

    BioDiana Moanga is a Lecturer and the Manager of the Spatial Analysis Center in the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability. She teaches the Remote Sensing of Land class and the Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science class. Her research includes studying land use land cover change processes using remote sensing and spatial analysis, focusing on the effects of environmental and anthropogenic stressors on coastal socio-environmental systems. She is particularly passionate about furthering our understating of climate equity for coastal communities and mapping coastal hazards at various scales. She has a Ph.D. in Environmental Science Policy and Management from UC Berkeley in 2020. Her dissertation research used geospatial techniques to study land use and land cover changes across California. Specifically, her research explored management impacts on California’s coastal lands, agricultural transitions in the Central Valley, and wildfire activity under future climate regimes. Diana also earned a Master’s in Science in Marine Affairs and Policy from the University of Miami in 2015. For her master's research she examined the spatial and temporal characteristics of harmful algal blooms and studied coastal zone management and coral conservation.

  • Josheena Naggea

    Josheena Naggea

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsJosheena is an André Hoffmann Fellow at the Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions and the World Economic Forum Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Her current work is focused on centering blue justice and equity for ocean innovations in small-scale fisheries and aquaculture. Her community-engaged research has focused on climate change adaptation, marine protected area management, disaster impacts and recovery, and the valorization of natural and cultural heritage in ocean governance. She has a keen interest in understanding people-ocean connections and how they influence coastal livelihoods, local environmental stewardship, and food security.

    She is also an IPBES (Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services) fellow on the Transformative Change Assessment, investigating the determinants of transformative change and pathways for achieving the 2050 Vision for Biodiversity.

    Josheena holds a Ph.D. in Environment and Resources from the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER) at Stanford University. Her doctoral work aimed to support ocean governance in the Western Indian Ocean, with a focus on the Republic of Mauritius, her home country. She is presently a national steering committee member of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Small Grants Programme (SGP), implemented by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Mauritius, where she continues to support community-led efforts for sustainability, biodiversity conservation, and poverty alleviation.

  • Alireza Namayandeh

    Alireza Namayandeh

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Namayandeh's research interests are centered around three primary areas: 1) the formation and transformation of natural nanoparticles, 2) their interaction with contaminants and nutrients in the Earth's surface environment, and 3) how these interactions impact human health. He is currently studying the generation of toxic metals in soils at extremely high temperatures. He is also involved in solving global and environmental health problems, particularly in low-income countries. He is working on a project in Bangladesh focusing on lead exposure.

    He is also interested to integrate environmental justice into his research. He conducts Eco-theater workshops at Stanford, in which participants create performing arts about the social aspects of California wildfires, including the impact on underrepresented groups such as inmate firefighters.

  • Rosamond Naylor

    Rosamond Naylor

    William Wrigley Professor, Professor at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute, at the Freeman Spogli Institute and Professor, by courtesy, of Economics and of Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch Activities:
    My research focuses on the environmental and equity dimensions of intensive food production systems, and the food security dimensions of low-input systems. I have been involved in a number of field-level research projects around the world and have published widely on issues related to climate impacts on agriculture, distributed irrigation systems for diversified cropping, nutrient use and loss in agriculture, biotechnology, aquaculture and livestock production, biofuels development, food price volatility, and food policy analysis.

    Teaching Activities:
    I teach courses on the world food economy, food and security, aquaculture science and policy, human society and environmental change, and food-water-health linkages. These courses are offered to graduate and undergraduate students through the departments of Earth System Science, Economics, History, and International Relations.

    Professional Activities:
    William Wrigley Professor of Earth Science (2015 - Present); Professor in Earth System Science (2009-present); Director, Stanford Center on Food Security and the Environment (2005-2018); Associate Professor of Economics by courtesy (2000-present); William Wrigley Senior Fellow, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Woods Institute for the Environment (2007-2015); Trustee, The Nature Conservancy CA program (2012-present); Member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Beijer Institute for Ecological Economics in Stockholm (2011-present), for the Aspen Global Change Institute (2011-present), and for the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program (2012-present); Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow in Environmental Science and Public Policy (1999); Pew Fellow in Conservation and the Environment (1994). Associate Editor for the Journal on Food Security (2012-present). Editorial board member for Aquaculture-Environment Interactions (2009-present) and Global Food Security (2012-present).

  • Lauren Oakes

    Lauren Oakes

    Adjunct Assistant Professor, Earth System Science

    BioLauren E. Oakes is an ecologist and human-natural systems scientist. She is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Earth System Science at Stanford University and a Conservation Scientist on the Forests and Climate Change team at the Wildlife Conservation Society. Lauren teaches workshops and short-courses in narrative science writing and interdisciplinary environmental sciences, and she combines ecological research with methods from the social sciences to help people adapt to climate change impacts. Her work focuses on understanding the impacts of climate change to forest ecosystems and advancing best practices in adaptation and implementation of nature based solutions. She earned her PhD from Stanford University’s Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (2015) and her bachelor’s degree from Brown University (2004) in Environmental Studies and Visual Art, studying film and photography. Her first book, In Search of the Canary Tree (Basic Books, Hachette Book Group), is a narrative science memoir about finding faith in the ability of people to cope with a rapidly changing planet. Science Friday selected the Canary as one of the Best Science Books of 2018.

    For nearly 20 years, Dr. Oakes has worked on a suite of environmental issues as a researcher, scholar, advocate, and documentarian (Alaska Gold 2012; Red Gold 2008). During that time, she confronted changes in rural communities and challenges in conservation, such as mining development in pristine watersheds in Alaska or road development through the temperate forests of Chile. She witnessed whole communities transformed by oil and gas development in the American West. She spent six years studying climate change impacts to forest ecosystems in the Alexander Archipelago, Alaska. At the core of her passions for research, teaching, and communicating issues of environmental change is the desire to improve resource management and conservation practices.

    In addition to publishing her climate- and forest-related research in peer-reviewed journals, Lauren has contributed to National Geographic, the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, Scientific American, and Anthropocene Magazine, Emergence Magazine, and Lit Hub.. Her research has been profiled by The Atlantic, Scientific American, Smithsonian, Outside Magazine, National Geographic, The Christian Science Monitor, Adventure Kayak Magazine, and ClimateWire, among other outlets. With years of experience in professional outdoor guiding, she has also lead multi-day expeditions for National Geographic Expeditions and co-designed/co-taught Stanford field courses in Alaska and the Grand Canyon.

  • Emily R. Paris

    Emily R. Paris

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science, admitted Autumn 2020
    Masters Student in Earth System Science, admitted Winter 2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInvestigating the limits of life on Earth and beyond

  • Kabir Peay

    Kabir Peay

    Director of the Earth Systems Program, Associate Professor of Biology, of Earth System Science and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab studies the ecological processes that structure natural communities and the links between community structure and the cycling of nutrients and energy through ecosystems. We focus primarily on fungi, as these organisms are incredibly diverse and are the primary agents of carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. By working across multiple scales we hope to build a 'roots-to-biomes' understanding of plant-microbe symbiosis.

  • Minghao Qiu

    Minghao Qiu

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Earth System Science

    BioI am a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University, working with Marshall Burke as a part of the ECHO (Environmental Change and Human Outcomes) Lab. My research interest is in environmental and energy policies with a global focus on issues involving air pollution, climate change and energy systems. I use causal inference, machine learning, and atmospheric chemistry modeling to study the sustainability challenges at the intersection of energy, pollution and climate using real-world data.

    I received my PhD degree from MIT’s Institute for Data, Systems, and Society on September 2021, advised by Noelle Selin. I also worked closely with my committee members: Valerie Karplus, Cory Zigler and Colette Heald. I received bachelor degrees in environmental sciences and economics from Peking University in Beijing.

  • Trent Robinett

    Trent Robinett

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science, admitted Autumn 2021
    Masters Student in Earth System Science, admitted Summer 2023

    BioTrent is first year Ph.D. student working with Prof. Alexandra Konings in the Earth System Science department. He is interested in using remote sensing data to better understand the role of plant water hydraulics in determining terrestrial vegetation's response to climate change. Trent graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 2021 with a B.S. in Environmental Sciences and a minor in Catholic Social Tradition.

  • D. Brian Rogers

    D. Brian Rogers

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science, admitted Autumn 2020
    Masters Student in Earth System Science, admitted Autumn 2022

    BioBrian is a doctoral student in Earth System Science working with Dr. Kate Maher. Brian is interested in developing robust monitoring, reporting, and verification frameworks for open-system carbon dioxide removal (CDR) technologies. He is currently focusing on extending the utility of reactive transport models to address uncertainties in enhanced rock weathering as a CDR strategy.

  • Lorenzo Rosa

    Lorenzo Rosa

    Assist Prof (By Courtesy), Earth System Science

    BioLorenzo Rosa is a Principal Investigator at Carnegie Institution for Science. Lorenzo is also an Assistant Professor (by courtesy) in the Doerr School of Sustainability at Stanford University. Prior to joining Carnegie, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Institute of Energy and Process Engineering at ETH Zurich. He holds a Ph.D. in Environmental Science from University of California Berkeley, and a B.S. and M.S. in Environmental Engineering from Politecnico di Milano, Italy.

    Dr. Rosa's research focuses on enhancing agricultural productivity and promoting sustainability in agriculture, energy, and water systems. He addresses the challenges posed by climate change to agriculture and explores strategies to minimize the environmental impacts of farming. Dr. Rosa's impactful research informs sustainable development policies and investments, contributing to agricultural and water sustainability. His work also assesses the potential benefits, and unintended consequences, of innovations designed to meet global demands for energy, water, and food.

    ​​Dr. Rosa’s contributions to science and society have been recognized through multiple awards, including the 2019 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Hydrology Research Grant and the 2021 AGU Science for Solutions Award. The latter award is given “for significant contributions in the application and use of the Earth and space sciences to solve societal problems,” and in Dr. Rosa’s case recognized his contributions to understanding global water-energy-food linkages and solutions to benefit humanity and nature. The AGU is the primary professional society in Dr. Rosa’s field, and these awards are extremely selective and highly prestigious. In addition to these awards, he was also listed among the most influential young leaders in Science and Technology of the year 2020 by Forbes 30 Under 30.

    ​​Dr. Rosa is an avid sportsman, when he is not at his desk, you can find him running, cycling, swimming, and skiing. In his career as athlete, he won the Regional and Italian Championships in mountain running.

    Recent publications can be found on his Google Scholar page: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?hl=en&user=riiy1mEAAAAJ

    Lab website: https://lorenzo-rosa.wixsite.com/curriculum

  • Bianca Santos

    Bianca Santos

    Ph.D. Student in Environment and Resources, admitted Autumn 2019
    Other Tech - Graduate, Earth System Science

    BioBianca Santos is a PhD Candidate in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability. Her work focuses on integrating science, policy and society in the management of marine species in the Pacific. Utilizing both natural and social science tools, her research applies interdisciplinary methods from the fields of marine science, ocean governance and policy, and environmental decision-making. Current areas of active research include: (1) The future of ocean governance in the high seas, (2) Climate-driven habitat shifts of migratory species and its implications for fisheries management, and (3) Socio-ecological impacts of climate change on small scale fisheries in Palau. In addition to her research, Bianca is passionate about science communication and outreach.

    Prior to Stanford, Bianca served as an International Activities Analyst as a 2018 National Sea Grant Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in NOAA Research’s Office of International Activities. She also worked with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to support issues related to spatial marine management.

  • Benjamin Shapero

    Benjamin Shapero

    Ph.D. Student in Earth System Science, admitted Autumn 2020

    BioI am a geomicrobiologist and am broadly interested in the connections between protein biochemistry, environmental microbiology, and biogeochemistry. I hail from the surf town of Encinitas near San Diego. I completed my undergraduate studies at the University of Southern California (USC), where I majored in both Biological Sciences and Classical Saxophone Performance. At USC I volunteered in a cellular and molecular neuroscience lab, and it was there that I discovered my fascination with proteins. After graduation, I worked in a vaccine design lab at Scripps Research. This research fostered my growing fascination with protein biochemistry and further exposed me to the realm of microbiology. I have since followed my interests in proteins and microbiology, along with my longstanding passion for climate science, to the field of geomicrobiology. I am currently pursuing a Ph.D. in geomicrobiology at Stanford University in the Earth System Science department.

  • Aditi Sheshadri

    Aditi Sheshadri

    Assistant Professor of Earth System Science and, by courtesy, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioI joined Stanford's Earth System Science department as an assistant professor 2018. Prior to this, I was a a Junior Fellow of the Simons Foundation in New York, and a postdoctoral research scientist at Columbia University’s Department of Applied Physics and Applied Math and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. I got my Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science at MIT's Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, in the Program for Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate, where I worked with R. Alan Plumb. I’m broadly interested in atmosphere and ocean dynamics, climate variability, and general circulation.

    I'm particularly interested in fundamental questions in atmospheric dynamics, which I address using a combination of theory, observations, and both idealized and comprehensive numerical experiments. Current areas of focus include the dynamics, variability, and change of the mid-latitude jets and storm tracks, the stratospheric polar vortex, and atmospheric gravity waves.