Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education


Showing 1-45 of 45 Results

  • Kim Beil

    Kim Beil

    ITALIC Associate Director

    BioKim Beil is an art historian who specializes in the history of photography. Her book, Good Pictures: A History of Popular Photography, looks at 50 stylistic trends in the medium since the 19th century. Recently she’s written about photography and climate change for The Atlantic, a survey of street views for Cabinet, and a history of screenshots for the Believer. She also writes frequently about modern and contemporary art for Artforum, Art in America, BOMB, Photograph, and Sculpture magazines.

  • Chloe Summers Edmondson

    Chloe Summers Edmondson

    Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education

    BioChloe Summers Edmondson is a Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (previously Thinking Matters). She received her PhD from Stanford in the French & Italian Department in 2020. Her research is situated at the crossroads of literary criticism, cultural history, and media studies. She specializes in 17th and 18th-century France, with a particular focus on letter-writing practices. She has also worked extensively in the field of Digital Humanities. Chloe was co-project lead on the "Salons Project" with Melanie Conroy, a project under the umbrella of "Mapping the Republic of Letters." She completed the Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities offered through CESTA, the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis. Her work has appeared in The Journal of Modern History, Digital Humanities Quarterly, and in the series Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment. Most recently she co-edited a volume with Dan Edelstein, entitled Networks of Enlightenment: Digital Approaches to the Republic of Letters, with Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment. She holds a BA with Honors in French and a MA in Communication, also from Stanford.

    Courses taught include: "Stories Everywhere," "Design that Understands Us," and "Reading the Body."

  • Nate Grubman

    Nate Grubman

    COLLEGE Teaching Fellow

    BioNate Grubman is a Teaching Fellow in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education (COLLEGE). He was previously a postdoctoral scholar at the Freeman-Spogli Institute's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Prior to coming to Stanford, he earned a PhD in political science at Yale University, an MS in Applied Economics at Johns Hopkins University, and a BA in International Relations at Tufts University. He has taught courses focusing on democracy, contemporary problems of civic engagement, international development, and macroeconomics.

    Nate is currently working on a book entitled Skipping Class: Tunisia's Party System After the Revolution. The book uses archival material, elite interviews, an original survey, and analysis of campaign materials to understand why the party system formed after Tunisia's 2010--11 uprising failed to offer appealing economic policy choices to voters. More broadly, the book considers the role of political parties and their policy promises during transitions from authoritarian rule. His other research focuses on corruption and political nostalgia. His research has been published by the Journal of Democracy, the Middle East Research and Information Project, the Project on Middle East Democracy, and the Washington Post Monkey Cage.

    Nate first went to North Africa in 2007, when he studied abroad in Cairo and briefly lived on a boat. After graduating from college, he spent two years teaching middle school English and high school history in Cairo. He was surprised and inspired by the popular uprising that took place in Egypt in 2011 and has dedicated the time ever since to studying the many difficulties experienced during political transitions. In addition to his time in Egypt, he has studied in Morocco and conducted extensive research in Tunisia.

  • Melissa A. Hosek

    Melissa A. Hosek

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioMelissa A. Hosek earned her Ph.D. in Chinese from the department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Stanford University. She specializes in modern Chinese literature with interests in environmental humanities, STS (science, technology, and society), and the digital humanities. Her dissertation, "The Ecological Imagination: Nature, Technology, and Criticism in Chinese Science Fiction: 1976-Today," examines how modern Chinese eco-perspectives are informed by and condition ideas about science and technology. She analyzes a wide range of notable science fiction films, novels, and short stories to argue that ideas about ecology are deeply entangled with ideas about scientific progress, but can also serve as a vehicle for critiquing scientific development.

    Melissa is also interested in higher education pedagogy and Chinese language teaching and learning. She earned certificates in Language Program Management and ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interviewing from Stanford's Language Center. She has taught classes in Mandarin Chinese, film studies, Chinese literature, and East Asian Studies. In the field of digital humanities, she has developed several projects and received the Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities from Stanford's Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis. Her other research interests include materialism, science fiction studies, critical theory, and nationalism.

  • Nura Alia Hossainzadeh

    Nura Alia Hossainzadeh

    SLE Lecturer

    BioNura Hossainzadeh is a Lecturer in the Structured Liberal Education program and a political theorist by training. Her interest in political theory began when she was an undergraduate at Harvard, where she studied the canon of political theory—which begins in ancient Greece and ends in contemporary Europe and the U.S. After college, Nura moved to Qom, Iran, enrolling in an all-female Islamic seminary, Jami’at Al-Zahra, and taking courses in Islamic political thought and the Iranian revolution. She continued her study of both Western and Islamic political thought at UC Berkeley’s Department of Political Science, where she earned her Ph.D. in political science in 2016, writing her dissertation on a figure who not only wrote political theory but led an Islamic government—Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

    Nura’s current book project is entitled Islamic Republican: Ruhollah Khomeini’s Political Thought. Khomeini's thought became a primary resource for the writing of Iran’s Islamic constitution and continues to influence politics in contemporary Iran. Nura’s book examines all of Khomeini’s political works in the original Persian: his yet-untranslated book, published in 1943, The Unveiling of Secrets; his more widely read 1970 seminary lectures (later compiled into a book form), Islamic Government; and his post-revolutionary statements, speeches, and correspondence, contained in 11 volumes. The book concludes by investigating how contemporary Islamic thinkers engage Khomeini’s legacy and deploy it to justify or criticize democratic elements in Islamic governance.

    While pursuing research on Khomeini, Nura has taught a variety of courses on topics as diverse as American politics and government, feminist thought, canonical and non-Western political theory, Iranian and Middle East politics, and legal theory.

  • Michaela Hulstyn

    Michaela Hulstyn

    SLE Lecturer

    BioMichaela Hulstyn is a Lecturer in Structured Liberal Education (SLE), a first-year residential education program at Stanford University.

    Her first monograph, _Unselfing: Global French Literature at the Limits of Consciousness_, is forthcoming with the University of Toronto Press in 2022. Her research interests center on 20th- and 21st-century French and Francophone literature, phenomenology of the self and intersubjectivity, cognitive approaches to transcultural literature, and literature as ethical philosophy. Her work has appeared in MLN, Philosophy and Literature, and Contemporary French and Francophone Studies, among other places.

    She previously held academic appointments at Florida State University and Reed College.

  • Alison Grace Laurence

    Alison Grace Laurence

    Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education

    BioAlison Laurence is a Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education. She received her PhD from MIT’s interdisciplinary program in History, Anthropology, and Science, Technology, and Society (HASTS) in 2019. A cultural and environmental historian, she specializes in the study of nature on display. Her current book manuscript--Of Dinosaurs and Culture Wars: Extinction, Extraction, and Modern American Monsters--traces how popular displays transformed dinosaurs and other creatures of deep time from scientific specimens to consumer objects and artifacts of everyday American life. Alison’s work has appeared in the Science Museum Group Journal, the History of Anthropology Newsletter, and the Anthropocene Curriculum. She holds a BA in Classics from Brown University and an MA in History and Public History from the University of New Orleans.

    During the 2021-22 academic year, she is teaching "Stories Everywhere," "Design That Understands Us," "The Meat We Eat," and a new IntroSem called "Animal Archives."

  • Roy Lee

    Roy Lee

    COLLEGE Teaching Fellow

    BioI am a Thinking Matters Fellow. This year, I will be teaching Rules of War and Emotion. My research focuses on ancient Greek philosophy, especially Aristotle's ethics. I also have interests in contemporary ethics, political philosophy, and other periods and areas of the history of philosophy.

  • Mejgan Massoumi

    Mejgan Massoumi

    Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education

    BioMejgan Massoumi received her Ph.D. in June of 2021 from the History Department at Stanford University. Her work and research explores Afghan engagement with a global communication technology, the radio, during a period of intense political reform and social transformations (1960-1979). Drawing on archives in Farsi, Pashto, Tajik, Urdu, and English, and a collection of oral histories from former Radio Afghanistan employees and other producers of music and art, her work offers a fresh perspective on Afghan history by considering the mobile and fluid international networks made possible through the producers and consumers of the radio and music in the twentieth century and the centrality of Afghan people to that story.

    Having earned previous degrees in Architecture (B.A.) and City Planning (M.C.P) from the University of California at Berkeley, the foundation of her scholarship is built upon a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspective. Her study of the past is informed through the study of sounds broadcast in and beyond the built environment.

    As a scholar and educator, and refugee and immigrant, Mejgan is committed to advancing a culture of equity and inclusion within academia through her activism and advocacy for diversity as well as her teaching and scholarship focused on the study of history through the experiences of marginalized peoples, places, and cultures.

    Mejgan's previous research explored how the dynamics of different forms of religious fundamentalisms are produced, represented and practiced in the city. The culmination of this research can be found in her co-edited book, The Fundamentalist City? Religiosity and the Remaking of Urban Space (Routledge, 2010). Another project that explored the multiple meanings of diversity, inclusion, and exclusion in fast-changing urban contexts resulted in the co-edited volume Urban Diversity: Space, Culture, and Inclusive Pluralism in Cities Worldwide (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010). Her master's research focused on race and inter-ethnic conflicts in post-9/11 Afghanistan, highlighting how humanitarian aid from the West contributed to deepening social and ethnic divides. She has also contributed articles to the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, Traditional Dwellings and Settlements Review, the International Journal of Islamic Architecture, and the Journal of International Affairs at Columbia University.

    During the 2021-2022 academic year, Mejgan is teaching "Why College?", "Design that Understands Us", and "Environmental Sustainability: Global Predicaments and Possible Solutions."

  • Hope McCoy

    Hope McCoy

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioDr. McCoy is a Lecturer in the Civic, Liberal, and Global Education program at Stanford University. McCoy’s research agenda focuses on the intersection between education and diplomacy, with an interest in transnational education and policy. Dr. McCoy's first book (under contract), entitled:
    "From Congo to GONGO: Higher Education, Critical Geopolitics, and the New Red Scare" is one of the winners of the 2021 Emerging Scholars Competition in Black Studies. With a focus on Africa and Russia, this book traces the history of contact between the two regions. During each time period—education, politics, and Black studies are woven together, each era with shifting values and purposes that influence foreign relations between Africa and Eurasia.
    A Fulbright scholar (2015-2016, Russia) with multidisciplinary expertise, McCoy previously worked as a research strategist at Harvard University on projects related to racial justice, equity, and inclusion. Dr. McCoy earned a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Northwestern University and a master’s degree and Ph.D. from UCLA in Education.

  • Miles Osgood

    Miles Osgood

    SLE Lecturer

    BioMiles Osgood is a Lecturer for Structured Liberal Education (SLE). As a former Stanford undergrad, Miles completed his BA in English with a minor in the Classics in 2011. After working at Oxford University Press in New York for two years, Miles earned a PhD in English at Harvard, where he designed and taught courses on global modernism, women's literature, and James Joyce. He has published public essays in Slate, n+1, and the Washington Post, along with academic articles in Modernism/modernity and ARIEL: A Review of International English Literature.

    Miles is at work on a book entitled "The Podium and the Stadium," which uncovers the little-known history of the Olympic Art Competitions of 1912-1948 and argues that twentieth-century world literature self-consciously adopted the qualities of international sport. Across studies of Olympic participants including Robert Graves, Jean Cocteau, David Alfaro Siqueiros, and Bunya Koh, and through analysis of sport in the work of H.D., Ralph Ellison, Marianne Moore, and Kamau Brathwaite, "The World Arena" documents the surprisingly pervasive genre of "athletic art" across major axes of twentieth-century culture.

    Miles has been working in frosh education for many years, starting when he was a Resident Tutor as a Stanford senior and continuing with his time as a Teaching Fellow for Harvard's "Expos" writing program. From 2016 to 2018, Miles also created and developed "J(oyce)-Term," a one-week winter-break bootcamp on Joyce's "Ulysses" for first-year students. He has extended his teaching to high-school students and lifelong learners online as designer and lead instructor for the "Masterpieces of World Literature" series on edX.

    In his spare time, Miles designs board games, edits home movies, and walks around San Francisco with his dog Pico.

  • Belinda Ramírez

    Belinda Ramírez

    COLLEGE Teaching Fellow

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCultural anthropology; urban agriculture; farms and farming; food systems and foodways; food justice and sovereignty; environmental and climate justice; urban studies; agriculture and environment; citizenship; critical geography; critical race theory; ecology; ethnography; food (in)security/sovereignty; political anthropology; political ecology; political economy; race and ethnicity; racism(s); social movements and protest; social value; morality and ethics; community

  • Stephanie Reist

    Stephanie Reist

    Lecturer

    BioStephanie Virginia Reist is a Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education at Stanford University. Prior to coming to Stanford, she was a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Education Department at the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro, financed by the Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. She completed a PhD in Romance Studies with a focus on Latin American Cultural Studies as well as a Master's in Public Policy at Duke University in 2018. She holds a BA in Comparative Literature from Williams College.

    Her research and writing focus on issues of race, public policy, Black feminisms, cultural production, youth, and urban belonging in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Specifically, she is interested in the relationship between youth movements and access to higher education in Rio's predominately black, working class urban peripheries. As part of her commitment to public scholarship, her writing has been featured in RioOnWatch, Times Higher Education, The Independent and Jacobin Magazine.

    She also co-directed a short documentary on expanded access to higher education in Brazil that can be seen here: https://youtu.be/Q_60CIxvLHY

  • Jeremy Sabol

    Jeremy Sabol

    SLE Associate Director

    BioJeremy Sabol is the Associate Director of Stanford's Program in Structured Liberal Education (SLE), where he has taught as a Lecturer since 2003. Jeremy majored in physics and literature as an undergraduate, then received his Ph.D. in French. His dissertation examined the conceptual role of fiction in Descartes' physics and philosophy, as well as the impact of this use of fiction in later 17th-century French literary texts. Jeremy specializes in early modern European thought and French existentialism. Jeremy also teaches the history of design at Stanford's d.school, and he has lectured for Stanford's Master of Liberal Arts program since 2012.

  • Sam Sax

    Sam Sax

    Lecturer

    BioSam Sax is a writer, performer, and educator currently serving as an ITALIC Lecturer at Stanford University. They're the author of Madness, winner of The National Poetry Series and ‘Bury It’ winner of the James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets. They're the two time Bay Area Grand Slam Champion with poems published in The New York Times, Poetry Magazine, Granta and elsewhere. Sam's received fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts, MacDowell, The Poetry Foundation, and a Wallace Stegner Fellowship from Stanford University.

  • Nestor Silva

    Nestor Silva

    Teaching Fellow

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI study the environmental politics of hydrocarbon extraction sites in the Americas. These sites are inherently uncertain, both socially and ecologically. My research analyzes how science and politics are applied to managing these uncertainties. I argue that extraction-site politics demonstrate how colonial ideals inspire the management of fossil fuels and a number of other modern uncertainties.

  • Terrence Surles

    Terrence Surles

    Temp SoCo Lecturer

    BioDr. Surles is consulting with Stanford University evaluating California’s ability to meet its carbon neutrality goals. He is consulting with UC/Berkeley/CIEE for the CPUC on expediting disputes related to installation of behind the meter generation, as well as analysis and policy development for demand response, energy efficient, and storage technologies. He is consultant to Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) as part of HECO’s Integrated Grid Planning process for integration of distributed resources while maintaining grid stability and resiliency. He supports life-cycle analyses of energy systems for Hawaii PUC as well as analyses of disposal and recycling of solar and battery wastes requested by legislature. He consulted for Asian Development Bank (Malaysia and Indonesia) in 2019 and 2020. Since 2013 for APEC, he contributed to analysis of solar and wind in Vietnam and fossil energy and energy efficiency analyses in Peru and Indonesia, as well as energy system analyses for China, Taiwan, Korea and Vietnam (most recently in 2021). Other clients include USDOE, IEA, East-West Center, NELHA, UK Energy Research Centre, and State of Victoria. For IEA, he supported their activities in Southeast Asia focused on multi-national grids. In 2015 and 2016, he led the review of USDOE national laboratory capabilities for Department of Energy’s Grid Modernization Initiative.
    He was emergency hire as Administrator for Hawaii State Energy Office in 2017, working with utilities, NGOs, the legislature, and the Governor’s Office. From 2013 to 2015, he led Clean Energy Solutions for UH College of Social Sciences. From 2010 to 2012, as Desert Research Institute Executive Vice President, he led three divisions and four research centers in energy and environment systems. From 2006 to 2010, he led HNEI’s Technology Integration and Policy Analysis Lead, focusing on policies and deployment for grid integration of renewable resources. From 2004 to 2006, he was Vice President at EPRI focusing on air quality, health, energy/water nexus, and climate change issues. From 2000 to 2004, he was at the California Energy Commission as R&D Program Director with emphasis on energy efficiency, renewable energy, grid modernization, and regional climate assessment. In this position, he took leave from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where he was Associate Laboratory Director for Energy Programs from 1998 to 2000, focusing on energy efficiency, nuclear materials protection and disposal, energy storage, and climate change science. In 1997, he was as Deputy Secretary for Science and Technology at CalEPA. From 1978 to 1997, he was at Argonne National Laboratory with his final position being General Manager for Environmental Programs. Major program areas included energy systems assessment, climate change science, risk analysis and assessment, emergency planning and response, and energy and environmental modeling and policy analysis.
    Dr. Surles received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Michigan State and has more than 360 publications, technical reports, and presentations. He has served on a number of advisory committees (currently on two NREL Advisory Panels), including seven appointments with the National Research Council.

  • Barna Szasz

    Barna Szasz

    Lecturer

    BioBarna Szász is a Budapest-born filmmaker and video-journalist specialized in the young genre of online videos. Starting out as a video-journalist at the largest Hungarian news magazine, Index.hu, he later became the leader of the video team for the portal that has 1 million visitors a day.

    From the 1-minute Instagram videos to the 25-minutes-long short documentaries he believes that online videos are the best tools to affect today's society. Being able to reach millions of people Barna’s passion is to inspire viewers with personally engaging stories, and to make society better by presenting social-political issues and problems that would not reach newer generations through traditional media.

    From more than 200 videos that he has produced in his country his face is most known for the one where he ran faster than the tube in Budapest, but his most popular works are when he dealt with social topics: More than 400,000 people watched when he took anti-refugee hate-commenters to meet actual refugees, and 13,000 shared We Don’t Exist, his semi-documentaristic short film about how the Hungarian government manipulates the statistics of poverty in the country. Over the years he won the Media for Talents award and the Hegeto Honorka award for presenting issues of the socially disadvantaged.

    In 2016, he cofounded the Video Journalism certificate program at Moholy-Nagy University of Arts and Design, Budapest, and from 2017 he is a Fulbright Student pursuing his MFA in Documentary Film and Video at Stanford University.

  • Gregory Watkins

    Gregory Watkins

    Lecturer

    BioGreg has taught in Structured Liberal Education (SLE) since 2002. He has a BA in Social Theory (a self-designed major) from Stanford, with Honors in Humanities, an MFA in Film Production from UCLA, and a dual PhD in Religious Studies and Humanities from Stanford, also from Stanford. Greg's research interests hover around the intersection of film and religion, and he continues to work on a variety of film projects.

  • Daniela R. P. Weiner

    Daniela R. P. Weiner

    COLLEGE Lecturer

    BioDaniela R. P. Weiner is a COLLEGE Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education.

    Previously, she was a Jim Joseph Postdoctoral Fellow in the Concentration in Education & Jewish Studies in the Stanford Graduate School of Education (2020-2022). She is a historian of modern European history (with a focus on Germany and Italy), modern Jewish history, and the Holocaust. Her current book project, "Teaching a Dark Chapter," explores how the post-fascist countries of East Germany, West Germany, and Italy taught the Second World War and the Holocaust in their educational systems. It specifically explores the representations of these events in textbooks. A new project focuses on the history of baptism and conversion during the Holocaust.

    Her research has been published in Journal of Modern Jewish Studies, Journal of Educational Media, Memory, and Society, and Journal of Contemporary History. She has received fellowships/grants from: the Fulbright U.S. Student Program (Germany, AY 2018- 2019); the Leibniz Institute for Educational Media | Georg Eckert Institute; the German Historical Institute, Washington, D.C.; the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies; and the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies.

  • John Young

    John Young

    Lecturer in Civic, Liberal, and Global Education

    BioJohn Young is a lecturer in Civic, Liberal and Global Education (COLLEGE). John completed his Bachelor's at Dartmouth College before earning his M.S. and PhD in Political Science at Stanford University.

    John’s research focuses on the built environment, and brings together scholarship from political theory, geography, economics, and psychology. Three big questions orient his work. How does the built environment affect the people who live in and move through it? How do laws, economics, and technology produce the built environment we have? Finally, do people have normative and political entitlements to physical space, and if so, what are they and how can they be secured in public space, private space, and with land-use policy?

    John also works as a carpenter, building and repairing residential structures. John finds it deeply rewarding to help people enjoy their home and get more practical use from it, putting theory and practice together to create built environments conducive to human flourishing.