Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education


Showing 1-50 of 93 Results

  • Christine Alfano

    Christine Alfano

    PWR Advanced Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Digital Rhetoric, Rhetoric of Gaming, Visual Rhetoric, Gender and Technology, Writing Program Administration

  • Doree Allen

    Doree Allen

    Senior Lecturer in Oral Communication at the Center for Teaching and Learning

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPoetics of the performed text, voice and gender, leadership communication, speaking in museum settings, pedagogy of aesthetic development, Readers' Theatre, healing and the arts, the rhetoric of stage presence

  • Angela Becerra Vidergar

    Angela Becerra Vidergar

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Radio and Multimedia Storytelling; Humanities Communication; 20th-21st c. Literature and Culture of the Americas; Disaster Fiction and Survivalism; Imaginations of the Future; Graphic Narratives; Theorizations of the Collective Imaginary; 19th and 20th-century Philosophy; Speculative Fiction and the Impact of Science and Technology on Society

  • Kimberly Beil

    Kimberly Beil

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies

    BioDr. Beil is a scholar of visual culture, with an emphasis on the history of photography. Her research concentrates on the ways in which photographic techniques are made to represent subjective experience. Current projects focus on popular uses of photography in the postwar United States, including an exploration of color photographs of modern architecture, as well as a study of the use of blur in automotive advertising.

  • Shaleen Brawn

    Shaleen Brawn

    PWR Advanced Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Rhetoric of Science and Technology, Science Communication, Publishing as Process and Institution

  • Tessa Rose Brown

    Tessa Rose Brown

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    BioDr. Tessa Brown, a Lecturer in the Program in Writing and Rhetoric, is a writer, researcher, and educator. Her doctoral dissertation, “SCHOOLED: Hiphop Composition at the Predominantly White University,” considered the contradictions of hiphop culture, writing education, and the fight for language rights in predominantly or historically white institutional contexts. Dr. Brown also researches social media and whiteness and femininity, and uses memoristic and autoethnographic methods in her work.

    Tessa’s essays, reviews, and fiction have appeared in Harper’s, Hyperallergic, The Forward, The New Haven Review, The American Reader, and rhetoric journal Kairos. Her peer-reviewed research is forthcoming in Peitho. Her novella Sorry for Partying was honored by the Paris Literary Prize in 2014. She has written a blog, Hiphopocracy, since 2011, and lives in San Francisco.

  • Marie Elizabeth Burks

    Marie Elizabeth Burks

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Thinking Matters

    BioMarie Burks is a Thinking Matters Fellow at Stanford University. She received her PhD in History, Anthropology, and Science, Technology, and Society from MIT in 2017. She holds a BA from Harvard University, where she majored in History and Science.

    Marie’s research and teaching interests lie in U.S. history, the history of science, and intellectual history. Her dissertation examines how certain social scientists working in American universities conceptualized social conflict in the decades following World War II. It is a study in the politics of knowledge, asking what it meant for academic social scientists to theorize about conflict in an era of purported consensus.

    Marie has taught courses in history, history of science, and science and technology studies at MIT and Harvard. At Stanford, she teaches “THINK 61: Living with Viruses” and “THINK 60: American Enemies.”

  • Justin Leonard Clardy

    Justin Leonard Clardy

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Thinking Matters

    BioMy Ph.D. is in Philosophy with specializations in Ethics and Social & Political Philosophy from the University of Arkansas. Currently, my research focuses on normative questions that arise within the contexts of interpersonal relationships and political theories.

    As a researcher, I am advancing two active research projects ethics and social & political philosophy. The first project, in ethics is in the philosophy of love and contributes to a diversity in academic research because the philosophy of love has historically been passed over by analytic philosophers. I've develop an account of love that centers on value. To love is to value your partner(s) and your relationship with your partner(s) in a way that provides you with reason for action. I apply this relationship theory to normative questions that arise in the contexts of interpersonal relationship such as the nature of love, the obligations between current and ex lovers, polyamory, emotional affairs, and the role that tenderness plays in fulfilling our special obligations.

    The second project reconceptualizes love in a broader narrative on public emotions and social justice. It aims to foster the emotion of civic tenderness for people and groups who are vulnerable throughout our society. I consider how attitudes of indifference pose a challenge to the extension of civic compassion. Insofar as we are indifferent to others who are in situations of need, we tend to be less compassionate towards them. I develop an analytic framework for the public emotion of Civic Tenderness to combat indifference toward people who are vulnerable before the American Criminal Justice System and the American economy. Civic tenderness is an orientation of concern that is generated for people and groups that occupy vulnerable positions in our society. Whereas compassion is a response to a situation of suffering, tenderness is a response to a situation of vulnerability. Insofar as occupying a situation of suffering implies having been vulnerable to occupying that position, vulnerability is prior to suffering and tenderness is prior to compassion.

    As a teacher, I believe in creating an intimate philosophical learning environment where people learn to be more caring toward one another as fellow citizens. In this environment, people grow familiar with and come to appreciate the central concerns of human existence, the importance of critical thinking and effective communication, and their roles as responsible citizens in a democratic society like our own. If we can learn how to encounter and appreciate differences in this environment, then we have learned something important about treating each other with care.

    As a public intellectual, I facilitate a community focused reading group called PAGES Reading Group and I have appeared in interviews and am a regular contributor to writing venues that are open and accessible to the public.

  • Tara Diener

    Tara Diener

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    BioTara received a Ph.D. in Anthropology and History from the University of Michigan in 2016 and a Graduate Certificate in Science, Technology, and Society in 2014. Prior to graduate studies at Michigan, she practiced as a Registered Nurse in obstetrics and pediatrics while earning an M.A. in Bioethics, Humanities, and Society from the Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences (CEHLS) at Michigan State University. She has taught courses in creative non-fiction writing, medical, biological, and sociocultural anthropology, international and African studies, global health, political science, and the history of medicine in the US, Western Europe, and sub-Saharan Africa. She is an anthropologist and historian of medicine, maternal and infant health and mortality, global health (non)systems, and nursing ethics and practice. She is proficient in both archival and ethnographic methods and her previous projects have focused on the United Kingdom and Sierra Leone.

  • Kevin DiPirro

    Kevin DiPirro

    PWR Advanced Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Rhetoric of Performance; Multimodal Presentation; Devised Theatre; Art and Technology

  • Huw Duffy

    Huw Duffy

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Thinking Matters

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHuw works on the history of Ancient Greek philosophy. His current research focuses on Plato's philosophical methodology and his conception of political skill or expertise, as well as Aristotle's critical response to Plato's ideas. He is especially interested in how Plato answered the following questions: 'What methods should we employ, and what assumptions about reality must we make, in order to successfully discover important, objective truths about controversial subjects such as politics?' and 'What does a person need to know in order to govern well, and to what extent can this knowledge be written down in a code of laws?' While Plato's answers to these questions, and to a certain extent the questions themselves, seem deeply foreign to us, Huw hopes that studying them will help us better understand our own assumptions about the nature and limits of philosophy and political thought.

  • Samah Elbelazi

    Samah Elbelazi

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Art-based Research, Rhetoric and TESOL, Narrative Inquiry, Islamic Feminism

  • Erik Ellis

    Erik Ellis

    PWR Advanced Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Multimodal Composition, Visual Rhetoric, The Essay, Style, Picture Books

  • Norah Fahim

    Norah Fahim

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Digital Rhetoric, Narrative Inquiry, Writing Program Administration, Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, and Second Language Writing

  • Lindsey Felt

    Lindsey Felt

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: 20th and 21st Century American Literature, Disability Studies, Media Culture, Science and Technology Studies, Graphic Narrative, Digital Humanities, Posthumanism.

  • Megan Formato

    Megan Formato

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: History of Science and Technology; Rhetoric of Science; Literature and Science; Science and Technology Studies; Scientific Writing Practices; Women and Science; Revision Practices

  • Thomas Freeland

    Thomas Freeland

    PWR Advanced Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Theatre (Shakespeare, German Theatre, Shakespeare in German); Critical Theory, Literature in Translation, German Literature, History of the American West, European History, Political Science

  • Mark Gardiner

    Mark Gardiner

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Social and Cultural Anthropology, African Studies, Environmental Justice, Race, Critical Science and Technology Studies, Politics, Institutions, International Development

  • Wendy Goldberg

    Wendy Goldberg

    PWR Advanced Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Rhetoric of Performance (with special reference to musical theater); Writing Center Studies; American Literature

  • Nicole Mara Gounalis

    Nicole Mara Gounalis

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Thinking Matters

    BioNicole serves as a Thinking Matters Fellow. She received her Ph.D. in Italian, with a Ph.D. minor in Slavic Languages and Literatures, from Stanford in June 2017. Her research focuses on the interplay of art, culture, and politics in Italy from the early twentieth-century to the present. Nicole is currently working on a book-length adaptation of her dissertation, which offers an alternative intellectual history of the politically-engaged works of neorealist film and literature that emerged in Italy post-WWII. The project examines the reintroduction of politics into mass culture through the lens of the Futurist historical avant-garde and Antonio Gramsci’s approach to aesthetics. Prior to joining Thinking Matters, she taught extensively at Stanford and at Notre Dame de Namur University. When not teaching, reading, or writing, she can usually be found at the movies, swimming laps, or volunteering with a local cat rescue organization.

  • Alexander Greenhough

    Alexander Greenhough

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSpecialization: Film Theory; Film History; Postwar European and American Cinema; Contemporary New Zealand Cinema

  • Sean Russell Hallowell

    Sean Russell Hallowell

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Thinking Matters

    BioA musician and composer, Sean Russell Hallowell received his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 2013, where he wrote a dissertation on the aesthetico-metaphysical valences of compositional tradition in European music from the late-fourteenth to late-sixteenth centuries. He comes to Stanford University having spent the 2016-2017 academic year at the University of California, Berkeley, where, as Lecturer in the History and Literature of Western Music, he taught two courses of his own design - one on historical practices of composition from pre-existing materials, the other on trans-historical theories of the music of the spheres (according to which natural phenomena governed by numerical proportion, such as the orbiting of planets, produce a species of music). His own music, composed in the electro-acoustic tradition, draws upon ideas from the history of musique concrète as well as that of the philosophy of time to explore the phenomenology of time in music and the relationship between time and identity perceived through musical form. An interdisciplinary thinker by training, as an undergraduate at Brown University he concentrated in comparative literature and music, and, as a graduate student at Columbia, he spent five years teaching Music Humanities, the university's core curriculum course in music history and appreciation. As a Fellow in Stanford's Thinking Matters program for the 2017-2018 academic year he will teach THINK 43: What is Love, THINK 59: Worlds of Sound, and THINK 45: Thinking about the Universe.

  • Andrew Hammann

    Andrew Hammann

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research and teaching focus on the history of slavery and racial prejudice in the United States, during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

  • Kristyn Nicole Mahealani Hara

    Kristyn Nicole Mahealani Hara

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Thinking Matters

    BioKristyn Hara is a Thinking Matters Fellow at Stanford University and currently teaches in the “Living with Viruses,” “The Cause is Uncertain,” and “100,000 Years of War” courses. She received her B.A. in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. Her research interests consist of anthropological theory and method, historical and political ecology, urbanism, materiality, spatial theory, and political philosophy.

    Kristyn’s doctoral research engaged archaeologically with the entanglements of human and forest histories as they are materially, relationally, and discursively expressed at monastic institutions as part of an urbanizing landscape at the ancient capital of Angkor, Cambodia. Her work, which was funded by sources including the Fulbright Program, National Geographic, the Society for American Archaeology, and the University of Chicago, mobilizes archaeological and paleoethnobotanical data to explore forest-based socio-ecologies at Angkor during the Angkorian Period (802-1431 C.E.) and demonstrates the long-term importance of community-based institutions in forest management and practices and their role in the production of past and present landscapes. Kristyn is also involved in research initiatives centered on Food-Energy-Water (FEW) dynamics within the context of hydropower development, climate change, and (trans)national politics in the Mekong region.

    In her free time, Kristyn enjoys cooking, traveling, hiking, reading philosophy, and composing music.

  • Arturo Heredia

    Arturo Heredia

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Ethnic Studies, Narrative and Rhetorical Theory, Cultural Studies, Classical Rhetoric, and American Literature,

  • Shannon Hervey

    Shannon Hervey

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Cold War Literature and Culture, Popular American Literature and Culture, Young Adult Literature, Posthumanism, the Digital Humanities, Writing Pedagogy, and Multimodal Composition

  • Nura Alia Hossainzadeh

    Nura Alia Hossainzadeh

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies

    BioNura Hossainzadeh is a Lecturer in the Structured Liberal Education program and a political theorist by training. Her interest in political theory began when she was an undergraduate at Harvard, where she studied the canon of political theory—which begins in ancient Greece and ends in contemporary Europe and the U.S. After college, Nura moved to Qom, Iran, enrolling in an all-female Islamic seminary, Jami’at Al-Zahra, and taking courses in Islamic political thought and the Iranian revolution. She continued her study of both Western and Islamic political thought at UC Berkeley’s Department of Political Science, where she earned her Ph.D. in political science in 2016, writing her dissertation on a figure who not only wrote political theory but led an Islamic government—Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

    Nura’s current book project is entitled Islamic Republican: Ruhollah Khomeini’s Political Thought. Khomeini's thought became a primary resource for the writing of Iran’s Islamic constitution and continues to influence politics in contemporary Iran. Nura’s book examines all of Khomeini’s political works in the original Persian: his yet-untranslated book, published in 1943, The Unveiling of Secrets; his more widely read 1970 seminary lectures (later compiled into a book form), Islamic Government; and his post-revolutionary statements, speeches, and correspondence, contained in 11 volumes. The book concludes by investigating how contemporary Islamic thinkers engage Khomeini’s legacy and deploy it to justify or criticize democratic elements in Islamic governance.

    While pursuing research on Khomeini, Nura has taught a variety of courses on topics as diverse as American politics and government, feminist thought, canonical and non-Western political theory, Iranian and Middle East politics, and legal theory.

  • Donna Hunter

    Donna Hunter

    PWR Advanced Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Scholar Activism/Engaged Scholarship; Empathy and Social Justice; The Rhetoric of Criminality; Identity; Racial and Social Justice Movements
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  • Harriett Virginia-Ann Jernigan

    Harriett Virginia-Ann Jernigan

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLearner autonomy, project-based instruction, storytelling

  • Jennifer Johnson

    Jennifer Johnson

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Intersections of Language, Identity and Culture, Sociocultural Studies in Education, Second Language Acquisition Theory and Bilingualism, Multimodal Communication and Theories of Embodiment, Deaf Studies

  • Christopher Kamrath

    Christopher Kamrath

    PWR Advanced Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Citizenship and Political Dissent, Media History, Cultural Memory, the Role of Cultural Identity and Self-Fashioning in Rhetoric

  • Hayden Kantor

    Hayden Kantor

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFood and agriculture; ethnographic writing; rhetorics of capitalism; ethics of care; culture and history of India and South Asia

  • Valerie Kinsey

    Valerie Kinsey

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Writing and Critical Thinking Instruction; Institutional Rhetorics; Rhetorics of Race and Gender; Creative Writing; Philosophy and Rhetoric; Historiography; American History and Literature

  • Melissa Ko

    Melissa Ko

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Thinking Matters

    BioMelissa Ko earned an S.B. in biology from MIT and a PhD in cancer biology from Stanford University. Her research aims to develop novel computational pipelines to make sense of the deluge of single-cell high-dimensional data collected by biologists. Using visualizations and modeling, Melissa reveals mechanisms of drug resistance in cancer and identifies more effective treatment combinations. During her graduate career, Melissa received support from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship, Stanford’s Diversifying Academia, Recruiting Excellence (DARE) Fellowship, and the National Cancer Institute F99/K00 Fellowship. Melissa has taught computational and cancer biology workshops at Stanford University as well as general biology at Foothill College. As a Thinking Matters Fellow, Melissa teaches THINK 3: Breaking Codes, Finding Patterns, THINK 61: Living with Viruses, and THINK 23: The Cancer Problem: Causes, Treatments, and Prevention.

    In addition, Melissa has been involved with numerous educational outreach programs including the Splash program at MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley. Through these programs and related efforts, she has taught middle school and high school students in a variety of subjects, from cancer biology to personal finance to poetry. Melissa is dedicated to improving the experience of underrepresented students in all STEM disciplines. She served as a mentor and program leader for numerous Stanford Bioscience programs including SSRP and ADVANCE. Through prior work with Stanford’s Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning, Melissa has also developed diversity and inclusion content for instructors of in-person, online, and hybrid format classes.

    Outside of work, Melissa enjoys cooking, playing video games, reading poetry, and going on walks in the park.

  • Alison Grace Laurence

    Alison Grace Laurence

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Thinking Matters

    BioAlison Laurence is a Lecturer in the Thinking Matters program. She received her PhD from MIT’s interdisciplinary program in History, Anthropology, and Science, Technology, and Society (HASTS) in 2019. A cultural and environmental historian, she specializes in the study of nature on display. Her dissertation, “Afterlives of Extinction: The Politics of Display in the Modern United States,” traced how popular exhibitions transformed dinosaurs and other creatures of deep time from scientific specimens to consumer objects, artifacts of everyday American life, and usable pasts that serve the present. Alison’s work has appeared in the Science Museum Group Journal, the History of Anthropology Newsletter, and the Anthropocene Curriculum. She holds a BA in Classics from Brown University and an MA in History and Public History from the University of New Orleans.

    During the 2019-20 academic year, she is teaching "Stories Everywhere," "100,000 Years of War," and "Preventing Human Extinction."

  • Hsiao-Shih Lee

    Hsiao-Shih Lee

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: 20 - 21st century Latin American Literatures and Cultures; Creative Writing; Translation; Poetry

  • Katherine J Lennard

    Katherine J Lennard

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Thinking Matters

    BioKatherine Lennard is a cultural historian working to understand how objects and images shaped the ways that Americans understood race, gender, and other categories of identity in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Her research and teaching practices both center on questions of how individuals, situated in a particular time and place, understand their position in larger social, economic, and political systems through their engagement with consumer goods and the material world. She received a Ph.D. in American Culture from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (2017), an M.A. in Visual and Critical Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and a B.F.A. in Costume Design from The Theatre School of DePaul University. She has received funding from the American Council of Learned Societies and the Mellon Foundation; The Institute for Humanities, and the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, both at the University of Michigan; and a Publicly Active Graduate Education (PAGE) program of Imagining America.

    Her current manuscript project is a material history of Ku Klux Klan regalia in the early twentieth century, with a particular focus on the industrial manufacture and national distribution of this powerful tool of racial violence. Outside of work, Katherine is passionate about contemporary art, collecting rocks, and finding new ways to cook all the vegetables in her CSA. She also does freelance historical research for costume designers working in television and film.

  • Helen Piserchio

    Helen Piserchio

    Lecturer, Stanford Introductory Studies - Program in Writing and Rhetoric

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSPECIALIZATION: Communication Pedagogy; Visual Communication; Presentation Skills